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On 22/10/2019 at 16:04, Caley Jim said:

elp.

 

My problem for my making more cassettes is that the only angle which seems to be available now is 12mm as opposed to the 12.5mm I've used up until now, which kind of upsets the overall design as far as being able to stack them etc. I have a couple of work-arounds in mind, however. 

 

Jim 

Jim

 

perhaps a card shim each side would resolve the problem 

 

Nick

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9 hours ago, nick_bastable said:

Jim

 

perhaps a card shim each side would resolve the problem 

 

Nick

The issue is keeping the width between the sides the same as the narrower angles will reduce that by 1mm.  The base of the cassettes is designed to slot between the sides when they are stacked. The two options I have in mind are a) use 40thou for the sides instead of 60thou, or b) put some plain rail along the inside of the angles, soldered to 0.5mm PCB ' sleepers '.

The first would be the simplest, but leaves me with several large sheets of 60thou bought for that very purpose.  Perhaps I should have stocked up on 12.5mm wide Al angle at the same time! 

 

Jim 

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On 24/10/2019 at 23:36, Donw said:

Jim these people https://www.aluminiumwarehouse.co.uk/aluminium/angle   offer a half inch (12.7mm) Angle which is probably the same as yours. It depends on how much you order to cover the delivery. I bought some for our club 0 gauge worked out much cheaper than I could get at the local builders yard trade price.

Hi Don.

 

Thanks for that.  I missed your post earlier with all the excitement of going up to Aberdeen!  Looks like it might solve my problem.

 

Jim

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5 hours ago, Caley Jim said:

all the excitement of going up to Aberdeen

Not a phrase one hears often, although in my experience it is a very jolly place to visit and stay awhile.

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On 28/10/2019 at 22:10, Caley Jim said:

Just as we were starting to clear up after the Aberdeen Show , roy presented me with a box " We'd like you to have this".

Box.JPG.ad0a26d52786551c8eab57c82addcaa7.JPG

He must have seen the puzzled look on my face because he then said "It's not what it says".

 

When I opened the box, this was the contents:

 

contents.JPG.985f6bf16989557d4434c3fea2b577aa.JPG

 

A CR dia.8 horsebox Neil had built from an etch reduced from 4mm scale.

Once the couplings are changed (I promised to give them back the DG's!) it will make a companion for the one I built many years ago from the same etch! :D

 

1988585789_2horseboxes2.JPG.ef9a35ddd1a2c4059f19cdc1ec217fb4.JPG

 

Jim

 

 

Very nice Jim, I have one of these etches stashed away, it could well turn up at Bath on a race day!

 

Jerry

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  • 1 month later...

While waiting on the wheels coming for my 0-6-0ST I've put Neil's horsebox through Biggar Works.

 

It has had the DG's removed, brake pipes, coupling hooks with screw couplings and AJ couplings fitted.  The solebars and headstocks have been painted black and the footboards painted 'weathered wood'.  It is now ready to enter service! 

The lettering and number are not quite correct, but I'll live with that!1167517963_newhorsebox.JPG.efae4d5a75e91effec1ea63a77b58332.JPG

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  • 2 months later...

Although most of my time over the past few months has been spent on the Jubilee Pug, Kirkallanmuir has not been neglected.  The woodland behind the colliery sidings has had short sessions spent on it - winter weather is not conducive to spending long periods in the garage - and is now substantially completed along with the ground on the far side of the colliery line itself. 

woodland__1.JPG.41824b94caecad7f4d46b2ebb65655a5.JPGwoodland__2.JPG.a4cf58011ed0d52e66e862d6e9e6fd24.JPG

 

I have not made any effort to model specific species of tree, but hopefully, by using a mixture of foliage mat colours and a variety of flock, foam etc as foliage on the lichen bushes, it looks fairly typical of a mixed woodland.

Jim

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  • 1 month later...

I have brought the middle board into my study to attend to one or two little maintenance jobs.  Back here, readers will recall that I had fitted up the signal box with LEDs, powered off 3 button batteries.  However, they only kept it going for around 30 minutes, if that.  One of the jobs I have been meaning to do for some time was rig it up to be powered off the 12v DC supply which powers the un-couplers and memory wire tou's.  That was done this evening.  On Nigel C's advice I wired a 1kohm resistor in the circuit and, while that gave a fair illumination, 2 such resistors in parallel (500 ohms) was a good bit brighter.

 

258147053_Boxlit12v2.JPG.cfff44158b6f3bb93f783eade25e98a7.JPG1861720732_Boxlit12v.JPG.223bf9152ded0259520825387f158206.JPG

 

Last time I got an order from Eileen's I included a miniature 2 pin plug and socket to use in this so that the box could continue to be removable.  This is the wiring arrangement.

 

1496130847_Boxwiring.JPG.5c70f0a5e248e80f851f848a31926cc3.JPG

Jim

 

 

Edited by Caley Jim
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  • 3 weeks later...

I had been debating for some time as to what to do about both the fence between the road and the railway beyond the livestock landing and that at the end of the landing.  While the board was in my study I came to the decision to make both as sleeper fences.  Accordingly a slot was cut along the line of both fences and that at the end of the landing can be seen at the bottom of the first photo of the signal box above, in line with the buffer stop.

 

This let me create a profile of the ground so that the fence could be made to follow it.  Both sections were made with 'posts' at intervals which reach down to the baseboard and so keep the fence at the correct height.   these can be seen in this photo of the long section ready to be painted.

Fence_1.JPG.2fcf665b6157d86b87dbfedc6e56536a.JPG

 

The bottom edge of the card is baseboard level and the card at the top has the ground profile and was used to align the tops of the sleepers.  30 x 30 thou styrene along the bottom gives it some rigidity during construction and is buried in the 'ground'.  I learned early on that is wise to paint the edges of the 60x40 strip from which the sleepers are cut before assembly as it is difficult to get in between them to paint there afterwards.  the vertical lines help to ensure that the sleepers are kept vertical to the horizontal and not the line of the ground.

 

1833642472_Fence2.JPG.385adf1a07bd0718f788b71ef977e731.JPG

 

Here the two fences are bedded in by pressing them into some DAS slurry run into the slots and the wall on the other side of the road has been made from DAS putty.  This was taken with flash, so the colours are a bit 'off'.

 

1861213252_Fence3.JPG.dbc30ee216550c4795978c64b89c2d61.JPG

 

A closer shot after the verge along the wall had been 'grassed'.  This was done by dribbling lines of PVA onto a tile and covering them with static grass from an applicator.  Once the PVA had dried the excess grass was gently brushed off and the strips cut down the centre so that they could be peeled off with a straight edge.  Bits of these strips were then glued in place with the straight edges against the wall. Small blobs of PVA were then dabbed on in places and small clumps of foam off foliage net pushed onto them to simulate weeds etc.

 

1997491330_Fence4.JPG.90d07841b085044f5f225303d247d091.JPG

 

This final shot shows the board back in situ with the slot cut in the adjacent board for the length of fence up to the bridge.

 

Jim

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Scenic work continues with the extension of both the sleeper fence and the wall on the opposite side of the road up to the wing walls of the overbridge.  Above the wing walls are short stretches of post and rail fencing, the posts being 40 x 40 thou and the rails 30 x 10 thou styrene strip.

1240368293_Fence7.JPG.54c5553707eac92ac69bc83df5c61c55.JPG
At the other end of the overbridges walls and a gate have been put in bounding the field beside the exchange sidings and the 'grassing' of the field finished off.

1420558609_Wallandgate.JPG.c54aa158047b095b31aebc1b4395acaf.JPG
The section of embankment between the exchage sidings and the colliery branch adjacent to the weightbridge office has also been textured and has sprouted some small bushes.

 

Embankment.JPG.d8570717ffb48a3a475e6bb1c066ce8b.JPG1729791720_Fence5.JPG.e50ad9c13e16f950d811d397d8bfb112.JPG963045587_Fence6.JPG.d3e309ba389dafb8094e26892833a524.JPG

 

 

The banking between the sleeper fence and the main line will be the next area to be textured.

 

I also dug out a pack of two piles of crates which I bought from Ten Commandments at Model Rail.  These are cast in plaster and were a rather insipid colour as bought.  They needed a wee bit tidying up round the lower edges, but once painted and with some tissue paper labels stuck on they don't look too bad.

 

 

crates.JPG.a51bfac469e3b9e9f68e8ae3e63baf4e.JPG

Here they are sat around the warehouse along with some barrels I had cast in white metal many years ago and a couple of new hurdles.

 

614038623_warehouse8.JPG.50165e4e2890047927ff04de9ee72b36.JPG

None of these are fixed in place yet until i decide if that is exactly where I want them.  One stack of crates may go elsewhere on the layout.  Apologies for the (very) foreign wagon in the foreground!    :unsure:  I have a very good excuse for it, but that's another story!

 

Jim

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The very foreign wagon looks great for me except for one small detail (PM on it's way). The Stephen Harris kits take a bit of time but are worthwhile and make up really well. I particularly like the stanchions modelled with their chains. I must do the same for mine. What did you use?

 

Taking of good kits geographically displaced I found a CR open in NSLR livery yesterday in a box marked coaches. Slightly less out of place 'down here' but still a long way from 'home'. 

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  • 3 months later...

Well, work on the Dunallander canopies has kept me away from the layout for a few months, however, having completed them I had a wee play  operating session, which showed up some electrically dead bits due to soldered joints needing attention.

 

It occurs to me that the latest addition to the loco fleet, 323 class 'Jubilee Pug' 0-6-0ST No. 217, hasn't featured here yet, so here is a shot of it at work shunting the interchange sidings.

1502749816_217shuntingthecollierysidingsonKirkallanmuir.JPG.84ef2f9f82bc24377255d9338e4521e9.JPG

Details of the build here.


I decided it was time I made some more buildings (my least favourite part of modelling) so turned my attention to the area on the far side of the bridge over the station end.  Here I intend to have a hotel facade stretching to behind the warehouse with it's yard behind a stable building atop the retaining wall behind the platform.  This building will be cut across by the backscene and all that will be seen is a blank brick wall.  The building is a foamboard shell with the visible parts covered in brick paper.  To give it some character I drew up some sandstone quoins, printed them off, cut them out and glued them in place.   I've also given it a wooden ventilator on the roof.

1388042507_Stables1.JPG.805defbec9efa90e9f145462ac79db7a.JPG

 

The top rows of slates have still to be added, along with gutters, downpipes and barge boards.  The strips of foamboard along the front space it from the retaining wall and will form a base for some brambles etc .

 

1313734188_Stables2.JPG.4adbe28453ff333f77dc294de6290d87.JPG

 

Jim

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The roof has been slated, and gutters, downpipes and barge boards fitted.

 

DSC_1412.JPG.47bbd2e400bebb9ac911b68d2b0daf3d.JPG

 

The embankments either side of the bridge have also been textured and sprouted some gorse and other growth.

 

I've also experimented with creating a cobbled entrance into the yard behind the stable block, including those long thin slabs that were laid to make the passage of cart wheels easier over the cobbles.

 

DSC_1413.JPG.d5a94ad813284f5776c35a4dfb94b63b.JPG

 

Not particularly neat, but it gives the overall effect.  I thought I'd try it in this location where it is at the back of the layout before I do it in the goods yard.  A thin layer of watered down and coloured DAS, left to dry out, then moistened to soften the surface which was then indented with the edge of a piece of etch fret, for the long slabs, and a little tool bent up from more fret to indent the individual setts.  A very light dust of black powder colour helped to bring out the detail.  The long slabs also got a wash of greyish yellow as I always remember these having that slightly different hue from ordinary whin setts.

 

Jim

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19 hours ago, Caley Jim said:

I've also experimented with creating a cobbled entrance into the yard behind the stable block, including those long thin slabs that were laid to make the passage of cart wheels easier over the cobbles.The long slabs also got a wash of greyish yellow as I always remember these having that slightly different hue from ordinary whin setts.


Hi Jim,

 

That is a nice wee detail. I remember there was a cart track like that up Union Street in Dundee, from the West station towards the jute mills. Unusually, it had attractive red granite slabs. The cart way seems to have been removed now in favour of a nice (for cyclists at least) smooth tarred surface but the slabs have been re-used to delimit parking spaces on the same street, as you can see in Streetview here.

 

regards

Graham

 

Seems like the link only puts you on the right street, but does not point you the right way! You need to turn round and look to the street side ...

Edited by Graham R
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Thanks, Graham.

 

I remember the ones in Glasgow and Lanarkshire having that slightly yellowish/olive colour to them.  I suppose it would depend on where they were quarried.

 

Jim

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Next up is the hotel itself.  I had originally planned to base it on a red sandstone building here in Biggar which used to be a hotel, but decided that it wasn't suitable for the location on the layout, so instead I've based it on another hostelry in the town, but made it an enlarged version.

 

373322656_Hoteldrawing.png.2b9088a189f94b30897acf24584415a2.png

 

The 'enlargement' is the two windows and dormer to the left, with the addition of the middle chimney head.  As can be seen from the plan, it will be in very shallow low relief and the backscene will cut in a curve through the right hand section.  Not sure how the roof will work out on this (the dashed line).

I printed  an earlier version of it and tried it in place on the layout.

DSC_1422.JPG.2805f82ce2af1e332c831744ac152045.JPG

As can be seen, I've changed the left hand building to a gable end.  It will be part of the market and in grey sandstone while the hotel itself will be red sandstone with the lettering in white.  I also had to raise the whole thing slightly to suit the ground level and reposition the cellar window at the left hand end.  I'm happy that it will provide the necessary 'visual stop' at the end of the bridge.

 

Jim W

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The cart stones look very good Jim. Here is one that still exists, I have various pics if interested. These are the approaches to Kelvinbridge , Glasgow. 

 

IMG_1656.JPG.eae3cdc60862ae634ab9c20818e16358.JPG

 

I am told that they were sanded in bad weather. 

 

I would agree with the greenish tinge, particularly when wet. So er , mostly green then. 

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The parts for the building have now all been drawn out and a start made on creating the texture paper for it.  I printed out the drawing with the texturing on it, cut round the outline and tried it in place.

 

hotel_trial.JPG.0a2e4154f3fa05df4bd341f40800cc51.JPG

 

I'm quite pleased with the way it is looking, but I hope the shallow steep roof won't be a problem visually.    There won't be the black line around the quoins and sills and the pillars and pediment around the door recess will be built up in styrene.  I just hope I can create a mix of paint to match the quoins. 

 

Jim

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4 hours ago, Donw said:

Looks very good to me Jim. I suppose those cart slabs were to avoid the whiskey getting too shaken up.

Thanks, Don.  In fact they were to make it easier for the horses by providing a smoother surface than the setts for the cart wheels to run on, especially on hills.

 

Jim

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Thanks for that David.  The font I used (arial black) was just a 'placeholder' until I found something better.  It's now been changed to Bahnschrift semibold, which looks a lot better.

 

1863952612_Hoteldrawing2.png.c0f65c4cdd702b866af95a6ee26af367.png

The height is restricted by it having to fit between the pediment above the front door and the upper floor window sills.   I did look at putting 'THE ALLANMUIR' and 'HOTEL' either side of the door, but I didn't like the look of that.

 

Jim

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