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M.I.B

North Cranford

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A journey of a thousand miles starts with one step,   so here goes with mine.

 

There isn't a piece of track laid (P4 and EM fans have just left the room because I have not mentioned "built")  All of the track has been purchased - Set-track, by Hornby in OO.  Over a hundred points at the last count - just to make sure that the right amounts match the trackplan.

 

There isn't even a baseboard or a room for North Cranford.....yet.........

 

But there are 40 locos in states of readiness.   70 pieces of coaching stock (Permanent Way, NPCCS and passenger) and a few hundred items of freight and Departmental stock.

 

Hope that's made you want to read further.

 

I'm open to criticism - you have to be to post on a forum like this, but my aim is to entertain and perhaps inspire (hahaha) someone, in the way that I have been inspired by the works of John Dew, GWRRob, Castle, NickWood   just to name my most frequently "visited" posts.

 

As well as some photos (which I need to get better at taking), I hope to also cover odd things such as:

 

Where North Cranford is and why I chose it. 

A novel method of track planning when you have no computer.

My take on weathering, RTR and RTR improvements.

My standard for a "finished" loco, carriage and wagon.

Some of the kits I have built.

Why I operate modified RTR, but also (sometimes) box fresh RTR, some very very old Ks kits and some stunning handpainted coaches from the late 60s.

Edited by M.I.B

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So having promised you details about my 4 track mainline urban late 40s GW layout, I'm going to repay a small debt and talk about my 1940s SR loco shed noticeboard.   

 

I have always lived a transient lifestyle which precluded building a big layout.  I have nothing against end to ends, or inglenooks etc, but if I was ever going to build one, it was going to be big, roundy roundy and "mainline".  No GWR BLTs for me.    I have spent almost three solid years out of the last 5 living in Afghanistan, and with a growing collection of models, I felt I needed somewhere to display them, or "work-in-progress".

 

So for a few measly quid at an auction in Devon, I got what was left of a glass sliding door fronted noticeboard.  With some TLC and Nitro-mors to get the BR blue and then SR Green paint off, I ended up putting some shelves in it, with track and ballast.  During the rebuld I found a note to say that this board was to be sent to a shed down Exmouth way (forgotten which one now).     Shame it doesn't have a GWR history, but I bought it as a display cabinet, not for its history.

 

Whilst I was away in the sandy stuff, over a shaky internet connection, I perused the pages of RMWeb and became very inspired on some very "dark" nights by the handiwork of some RM Webbers, especially Castle and GWRRob with his ANTB thread.  Recently the subject of pigeon trains came up on his thread and I promised a photo.  I have had a pigeon rake for some time, inspired by a post elsewhere on RMWeb.  It is an excellent ( and frequently seen)  excuse to get  some "teak" onto GW metals.

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Edited by M.I.B
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My pigeon rake is fairly typical - 2 full corridor brakes (Hornby Gresley in my case) a Thompson brake second (Bachmann), for the Pigeon Club's traveling assistants/carers/marshals etc) and tailed by another 2 brakes.   In my case, a third Hornby Gresley and one of the still much sought after Thompson brakes from Bachmann. 

 

For the un-initiated, the Thompsons were (IIRC) metal sided and painted in a beige colour - no time or skilled manpower to make teak coaches during WW2, plus the fact that teak would have had to come from some pretty war torn Japanese controlled parts of the world at that time.

 

The corridor brakes allowed the Club's officials/travelling party, to look after the crated birds en-route, hence why their carriage is in the centre of the rake.

 

They are currently headed by Haberfield Hall, seen here during it's phase as an oil burner, hence the change of number and odd dark metal flat-top to the tender.  This is a Bachmann Hall and still needs to go to the weathering shop.

 

Please excuse the photos, something else I need to learn after soldering..............

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Edited by M.I.B
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This has certainly got my interest. If the locos are anything to go by, the standard is going to be high

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I can't fit the whole rake in, so all you see here ( if you squint) is one of the Gresley brakes, the Thompson Brake Second and the Thompson Brake.  This is the only "completed" car in the rake.  Close couplers and gangways have been added to the right places, but only the Thompson brake has been weathered, and given a tail lamp.

 

Eagle eyed viewers will not that the white "modesty" windows of the brake second's "convenience"  are missing - the complete glazing has been removed ready for the airbrush..............

 

I must away.........as I am off somewhere rather special tomorrow.  So no time to cover the other things seen in the cabinet this week:  the new ROD/Collett combo, the black Grange, and another wartime black engine(I have 5) the 28XX.  Then there's the milk tankers, a aged tatty lake clerestory in Austerity markings for 1948 "scraping the bottom of the bucket " summer traffic, the SR parcels vans, and don't get me started on SIPHONs and NPCCS ( my favourite).

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Edited by M.I.B
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PS - I can't type for toffee, and frequently misplace my reading glasses (not used to "needing" them yet), so this thread will frequently feature edits after initial posts.

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This is the last loco to arrive for Cranford North.   A bit like marmite or monk cut shoes - and I like all 3.

 

This is the Bachmann 2251 class with ROD tender.  This is an un loved engine, still in wartime black, and extremely grubby.  This will probably end up pulling the breakdown train or PW train.

 

These days a loco gets the full treatment when it arrives and then goes into storage or on display, hence why this is completed way ahead of may others.  All of the "recent" acquisitions will be treated to the same processes, some are part way through and others are box fresh for now.

 

Every loco has real coal added, currently from the South Devon Railway, although Didcot coal will soon come into use.  I tend to weather the inside of the coal hopper with dry brushed "red oxide" enamel and then add the coal, sometimes when the enamel is still wet.  Coal + water = very acidic and no coal hopper in a tender would have remained painted black for long.  I will also add fire irons or a club hammer in some cases on top of the coal, or stored in the tender's tool rack.

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Edited by M.I.B
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Crew are painted in batches after the drivers undergo right arm surgery to rotate the arm down - Hornby crew are all for left hand drive engines, and without this surgery there is a plethora of drivers driving on the right side of the cab waving their right arms.  I often slice their right legs off as well to get a closer fit into the sides of the cab.

 

For renumbering I always use HMRS numbers and logos with the exception of the black wartime locos - only Fox do the correct red letters for these as far as I am aware.  Name and number plates are always from Modelmaster Jackson Evans.

 

Then I complete, sometimes with a lamp on the side in the correct position - lens facing in or out, a vacuum pipe and removal of the front coupling.  I know there are lamp perfectionists out there, but I am probably not going to mount front lamps on many locos.

 

Weathering - I use a mixture of two methods in varying amounts.  Either airbrush with enamels, and also "dirty turps" washing.  Many have a mix of both, especially if they are to depict a grubby freight engine.  The flash has not done this justice because it is nowhere near as white as the photo shows.   It really is a grubby washed brown all over the black, with very obvious wipe marks. The running gear were enamel airbrushed, and the washing effects added on top with old paintbrush washout white spirit.

 

I believe that there is no substitute for airbrush weathering with proper paint.  I'm not snobbish, and I certainly don't own an expensive set up, but this new craze of finding household products and make-up and powders all smacks too much of "trying to make my name" by finding a new product, or method.  I was a great believer in Tim Shackleton's first book about loco weathering, with his 4 colour system ( I use 6 colours in my "pallette") but I was heartbroken to find the next book full of tips about using powder, make up and stuff that belongs firmly under the sink.

 

The ROD tender does have a fall plate, which is in the "down" position under the fireman's right foot now.  It is a massive faff to get the fall plate right with the crew in this position, and the tender hooked up,  but when it is set up correctly, It looks great.              But not tonight Josephine.

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Edited by M.I.B
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All smokeboxes, steam pipes and chimneys are/will be finished in a mix of Revell "Anthracite" and Humbrol "Metalcote black" brush applied.

 

Here is Yiewsley Grange, a recent addition relatively speaking.  A Hornby BR black loco, renamed and numbered with the smokebox number removed.    YG still needs a whack with the weathering stick to the cab and boiler.

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Edited by M.I.B
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2822 is one of a pair of 28XXs, but this one is no longer green.  A great runner from Hornby.  This will need weathering, but wheels have been blacked using matt black enamel paint brushed on.   I have recently taken to using the same matt black paint marker pens used by a few people on here.  They work well and give a much smoother finish than brushing.

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Edited by M.I.B
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I am not planning on any double heading - it's not prototypical for somewhere near Paddington, so front couplings come off tender engines.  Tanks will keep them on.  I'm still "Ummming and ahhhing" about the couplings on the parcels diesel railcar - I may but 3 link chains on it and make up a "Parcels Only" marked BLOATER for it to tow about.

 

So to close this photo session ( sorry _ I do need to learn how to take decent photos like everyone else does)  here is something completely different.

 

Haberfield Hall (a Bachmann Hall) was converted to run on oil and like the other oil conversions, got a new number during the experiment.  Mike "Coachman" on here kindly gave me measurements and assistance to make the plasticard "tank" which was slotted into the bunker space  "just like the real thing".  The only other mod is the sliding cab window covers, which I have shown as partially removed, because i am modelling post WW2.   Crew are added, but no weathering just yet.

 

 

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Perhaps a few shots of the milk tanker collection, the SIPHONs and the lake clerestory next time.

 

Then it's time to re-stock the display case with something else, and write more if you're interested.

 

Not much to say about the 3 Hornby SR parcels/luggage vans, except that they are airbrush weathered by me, very detailed out of the box, and all three have different paint colours and running numbers out of the box.  Well done Hornby on the detail - How about some decent GW mainline 1930s/40s  coaches then?

Edited by M.I.B

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A short break from poor photos, and a couple of words of instruction on "How To Plan Your Layout When You haven't Got Software".   This part is jumping ahead a little because I had already worked out the track radii for things like the mainlines, and hence knew the curvatures and sizes of corners to fill etc.

 

For the last 2 years I have been mainly living in converted shipping containers in Afghanistan.  Quite nice compared to some of the places I slept in the Helmand River Valley, but that's a different kettle of fish.   From time to time I had a fair bit of time on my hands, but doing any modelling work out there was never an option,  for all sorts of reasons.  So I used some spare time to do the second phase of my track planning, which was then later carried out at Home.

 

Downloading and using Templot etc was not an option, so I used Google to get the sizes of various buildings and kits, from Metcalfe to Superquick and from Peco to Scalescenes, and then cut the exact sizes of their footprint onto paper. Once I drew them out onto A4 paper again, I scanned them back into my  laptop so that I could reprint them off whenever I needed them.

 

Most of these converted shipping containers have laminate flooring on the floors, walls and often ceilings too.  So armed with a 1m ruler, a builder's tape measure, a dry wipe marker pen, and a pile of building templates, I set to work.  The dry wipe marker is critical over the use of a "non-permanent" pen, which still has dye in it and can still stain,.  Dry wipes tend to be 100% removable as the "ink" is just a powder.

 

Once I was happy with positioning, everything was measured, and photographed in "helicopter" view.  This whole process changed my mind on the layout, and because of this, and the final stage which I did just before Christmas 2014, at home, has made me rethink about having an upper and lower level to the layout, and it all makes much more sense now.  2 levels is great, but unless you can hide the gradients, mainlines take on the appearance of the Snowdon Railway, which I didn't want.

 

 

Below is a version of the furniture warehouse (Metcalfe I think) with other buildings including the Superquick single road goods shed which will become the basis for a shed for 2 industrial engines:  "Hercules" and "Lady Charlotte"  who both use the joint stable but work in the brewery and Depository and Vaults accordingly.    The semi circle is the crane arc for the container offload crane.

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Edited by M.I.B

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I will describe the layout track-plan ( I don't have one drawn up yet, so please don't ask).  I will describe it in the order which it came to me in Autumn 2009, sat in the desert close to Nar-E-Saraj, where sadly lots of British lads, made the ultimate sacrifice.

 

1.    Four track roundy roundy Mainlines - one in each direction, with a relief.

2.    No Stations - I am not a fan of passenger stations on layouts.

3.    A brewery.  Good for filling a corner.

4.    A furniture warehouse.  I had started buying limited edition furniture CONFLATs from the Burnham and District MRC.

5.    A big shed.  Not Old Oak Common (OOC) size, but somewhere sizeable to park what would hopefully be a large stable, in view.   With a turntable - (not Hornby!)

6.    A coal stage. Didcot style, with "up" ramp (this is worthy of it's own post later)

7.    A large "steam in-- steam out" fiddle yard.  Perhaps scenic'd a little.  With a turntable (Hornby)

8.   A low level goods yard.      (As explained earlier, this has now been dropped)

 

Below are 3 Superquick double row sheds, and the "Up" ramp to the coal stage.

 

This process may seem mad to some readers, but to me:

 

1.  It provided some alternative sanity.

2.  It took my mind off where I was and what iI was doing.

3.  There are some apt military adages which prove that this isn't as barking as it looks, including "time spent in recce is never wasted" and "PPPPPPP" which is a little to rude for RM Web.

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Edited by M.I.B

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So having decided on an urban mainline, for me there was very little choice on where, what or when.  Here's why:

 

1.   My mate "Big Dave" was told by his dad that he could support any football team he liked as long as it was Everton.  Not quite like that with M.I.B Snr and railways, but as he was born in Datchet during the GW era, "spotted" at Langley and then moved to other areas served by BR(W),.  There was never going to be much choice, and this has rubbed off on me.

 

2.   M.I.B Snr has hung up his modelling tools and passed on his collection of coaches and kit built locos from the 60s.   They are fit and healthy, and would look odd running around with modern image stuff.  Diesels and DMUs just don't "do" it for me - but it doesn't mean I don't check out layouts of this era for hints and tips.

 

3.   My choice of engines has to set the layout in the final days of the GWR because I now own a pair of 10XX Counties.  That won't stop me running early livery clerestories and some early livery engines from time to time - some locos will never get updated in terms of livery or weathered.  (See 2 above).  I have also added some modeller's license to the Hornby Hawksworths and back dated them a year or too earlier than they were actually made.

 

4.   I have inherited a great 97XX with condensing gear.   It wiggles like Marylin Monroe when it runs,  and compared to today's kit builds it's odd because it's not weathered.  There are not many places to run one of these, so "Just West of Paddington" it is!  I have a hand full of MICAs for it to play with and have converted a TOAD as a tunnel van for Faringdon and Smithfield. 

Edited by M.I.B
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I had a working session on the bogie SIPHONS last summer. There are 10 or so, mainly the Lima inside framed Gs, with some Hs from Mainline and Airfix/GMR.  There may also be one from Replica Railways as well.        Located this close to London, and with two parcels train rakes, a CCT train, plus a mail train, bogie SIPHONs are naturally plentiful.

 

Mr Slinn's excellent work helped with authentic/correct numbers, which were applied from HMRS press on sheets, after the “shirtbuttons” were removed with T cut and a cocktail stick. I could have used a glass fibre pencil, not sure why I didn't. The inside framed G belonging to the mail rake had the addition and “working between ...” script added. Not spot on for accuracy, but not wildly off either. It and 2065 have both had the corridor doors closed up as they are the first in their respective rakes.

 

 

To hide where I got vigorous with the T cut, and to add authenticity, I have patch painted many of them to show replacement planks repairs, or in some cases, replacement panel repairs. Some planks cut right through the signwriting. I do this to TOADs too, and the colour mixing process is identical to that when I batch paint engine crew overalls: get a blob of the right colour enamel on the plastic tea/lap tray, and adjacent to it, one or two blobs of “close” colours or a light grey, and black. I mix the original and one colour to get a tone, paint a panel, or group of planks, or a jacket, and then mix that mix with the other colour. Then paint a different set of planks or panels, or overalls. The results are very pleasing and tough for me to currently photo graph. 50 shades of grey anyone ????????

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Edited by M.I.B
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I know that the Lima SIPHON Gs have incorrect bogies, but for now, they'll do. One day I may get everything changed to three link chain and tiny hooks, but there's too much else to do first. I remember doing 6 Lima inside framed Gs at the same time because 2 have matt black roofs, two have grey and two have white, and all were then airbrush weathered, some quite heavily.

 

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Edited by M.I.B
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A layout plan and stock after my own heart! I think you are many laps ahead of me however in realising your ideal layout, as I'm still hoarding/building/detailing stock at the minute!

 

Can I ask where you procured the 'To Work Between Paddington and Plymouth' transfers from please? I don't think Fox, HMRS or Modelmaster do them, iirc.

 

Liking the wartime black grange - though I'm not used to seeing GWR on a Collett 4000 gallon tender, 3500 gallon seems like the default for that insignia, at least in my mind!

 

Cheers, 

 

CoY

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I think I will still be hoarding and building, and detailing for a while yet - I work in the UK now, for an engineering company.  My days are long, and weekends quite full, so getting an hour's modelling in a weekend is now a luxury.

 

But the track and rolling stock and locos are paid for and "in the bag".  I have the money put aside for the final loco purchase (when it is launched - any ideas what that may be..........) so apart from a few lengths of flexitrack and some boards, I'm good to go.  The only reason to open the wallet for rolling stock would be if someone made a decent Toplight set in RTR.  As for locos - I'm covered in all of the required classes.  I'll do a list sometime, but I don't want it to come over all "look what I've got", because I'm certainly not like that and never have been.

 

Having somewhere to put it would also be an idea, but I'm working on that as well.  Trackplan is a minimum of ( I think without reference to the files) 8-10 feet by 10-12 feet.  Worst comes to the worst I will move into a 20' shipping container and build it in there - I've lived in quite a few, so I know how to make them "good".

 

"Work Between......" comes off the GWR goods wagons sheet from HMRS.

 

Black engines - I have the Grange, Collett/ROD and 28XX as seen already, and still to feature here are Anthony Manor and St Mawes Castle - 1 of only 2 black castles.

 

Collet&ROD with "GWR" - perfect for a tired out wartime coloured black engine.  It's a Bachmann which was only on release for a short time and trying to get one on Evilbay was tough - few turned up and they all went for way above what I initially expected to pay.  So I dug deep for a boxed, low use BR black one.

Edited by M.I.B
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Hi M.I.B.,

 

Thanks for the honourable mention in dispatches! This looks like a very nice collection of stock waiting for a layout which it is now going to get!

 

I will read on with interest and maybe it might encourage me to get on with a bit of railway modelling myself...

 

All the best,

 

Castle

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Honoured to have a gifted modeller and restorer of your calibre looking in.

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Here is a requested model.    Requested by MIB Snr to represent some of the old clerestory passenger stock which spent its last days gathering moss and rust in sidings until required to make up the numbers in summer passenger specials.

 

The start point was the recent Hornby clerestory - I think this was the LMS version, which was taken apart, brush painted with Pheonix "GWR Lake", while the interior/seating got treated to some red oxide car spray primer.    The roof was sprayed with Railmatch "Grimy Roof"  ( or something similar) before the lake was brused on.

 

Logos are from the HMRS GWR coaching sheet, including the Austerity style/size coat of Arms and "GWR" which is correct for this age of vehicle in summer service only condition.

 

Tao add some condition I brushed some dirty thinners ove rthe sides which has resulted in some bubbling and "crustification" of the lake, before it was all sealed with Testors.  Then out with the trusty airbrush to weather the running gear and ends.

 

A good way to break up rakes of identical looking coaches - one thing the internet has proved to me is that the GWR frequently had mixed rakes of coaches in trains, to the point where seeing more than 3 similar coaches together is quite odd.

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There are more than a few milk tankers on North Cranford.  23 at the last count.  All bar 2 are the 6 wheeler variety, and represent makers such as Dapol, Hornby and even one Lima offering.  Quite a few are from the B&DMRC limited edition range, so they currently remain un-weathered, whilst the remainder have all had a run through the airbrush shop. 

 

I took a shine to the Hornby's Express Dairies "Milk For London" tankers, but wasn't happy to keep the LMS chassis.  So I bought 3 , plus 3 more Hornby tankers ( forgotten which company) which were on GW logo's running gear.  I swapped the under-frames around, thus giving me the GW version of the Milk For London tankers. The LMS hybrid three went back on evil bay after being weathered, and they paid for themselves, which was a good end to the mini-project.

 

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The maroon "Independant" is still on it's original LMS chassis, and I'll leave it that way.  With the exceptionof the limited edition tankers, the rest are airbrush weathered by me,  Some lightly, and some very heavily. 

 

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The one weathering exception is a Coop tanker from Dapol which was factory weathered.  It's the red "Woolwich Coop" one, which would have come up from the West Country on either SR or GW metals, and then wound it's way to their offload point.  This was a nice Ebay find as it was a limited edition run done for a charity, and there aren't many about. 

Edited by M.I.B
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The tankers make up 2 milk trains and the brake vans are currently in the projects box.  Passenger brake vans and NPCCS feature heavily.  I am using various brass sides on RTR stock to make up the "K" fleet.  3 toplights are amongst them.  Base vehicles are B Sets, Mainline 57's and also some Hornby 57' stock too.  Sides come from Comet, Dart Castings and  Worsley Works.

 

I also have one 013 milk brake kit to make up.  Soldering is not my strong point, so it may be a while before this gets made........

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Time for some more track photos - this time not "dry wipe marker on laminate floor" but old fashioned "set track on carpet".

 

This exercise took place 3 houses and 5 years ago, on a winter's afternoon I think when I started to ponder fiddle yards.  This house was excellent for laying track out on because the sitting room floor was 26' x 13', so I could concurrently build 2 or 3 versions simultaneously.

 

The end result was a set of photos which helped me guage how many points to buy etc, what size trains I could accommodate, and how many fiddle yard roads I could have and still reach the furthest one back.  The result is a 10 road FY - 5 Up and 5 Down.

 

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The FY contains the venerable Hornby turn table in the lower left section.  This is an early version of the plan by the looks of things.

 

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This is some of the lower right section.  The Main and Relief are the top two tracks in this photo, so there is a mirror image above this, and one again on the top left.   The roads that go off to the right will not be much longer than these, and will probably hold engines, TOADs and PBVs, or perhaps the  odd singleton items of coaching stock used to break up rakes as described earlier ( including a Bullion van).

 

The complete fiddle yard allows me to store trains in either the Up or the Down Yard, but crossing the yard from Up to Down or vice versa is achieved by a  two crossovers at either end. 

 

My plan is to have a "scenic-ed" fiddle yard, much like Rob's on "A Nod To Brent".  I may even spruce up the Hornby TT, but there is only so much you can do with it - it is a "functional" piece.  The main shed features the gorgeous Heljan TT - more of that later.

 

And before any spotters ask - it's a Gretsch 6129 in black, with another in "Tobacco" and a Marshall JTM30 - the weird one with the greeny black case.

Edited by M.I.B
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