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Giles

Denton Brook 7mm Industrial

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I'm using the C&L flexi track (bull-head) - which is a bit nicer than the Peco (in my view). I shall notch it for 32' rail breaks and add fish plates, of course.

It will get primed and sprayed black before rusting with various colours (gunmetal, then assorted rust colours). Timber sleepers 'grained' - all before ballasting.

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I reckon watching the Garrett negotiate the point on the gradient will make for entertaining viewing! You certainly don't go for the easy life do you Giles... ;) 

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Where would be the fun in 'easy'....!

 

The difficult thing is going to be laying the track with points on gradients without undue twists as sidings diverge. We'll see how we go. I suspect that 0-4-0's with suspension wil cope, but 0-6-0's may possibly struggle - we'll find out soon......

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Well, quite!

 

And yes- that's what caught my eye, it's going to be quite a feat of tracklaying, but if you can pull it off it'll be quite something, I'm not sure I've ever seen trackwork like that modelled. Common enough on the real thing of course. Should make for some brilliant photographs, with locos and their trains at all sorts of odd angles relative to one another.

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Looks great, was wondering when your transfer crane would find a home...

 

I like the way you've done your tie bars and point blades. What crossing angle have you gone for on your points?

 

Also intrigued by your baseboards, is there a plywood base underneath the foam and at the ends?

 

Apologies if you've already explained that somewhere!

 

Cheers,

Andrew

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Hi Andrew!

 

I'm not sure what angle the crossings are - I just made them to match the stock rails!!!!

 

The blades and tie bars were surprisingly easy, and much less of a struggle than I imagined - yes, it was an extra job to 'joint' them with the fishplates, but no great hassle, and it made them much freer, without any wobble - so it's definitely something I shall carry on doing. It's probably not something I would attempt with soft solder though, as it would re-melt and just make life very difficult (unless one drilled all four holes through and captured the rails properly, so the soldering was unnecessary).

 

The baseboards are just 18mm ply ends (profiled), 90 x 18 stiles and rails, and foam on top - open at the bottom. When it's finished I will fire-proof it with Idenden, or another PVA based mix. It makes for a very light board (as was TEOTL). I still have to make and fit the leg sockets for the pipe legs. These (being welded steel) also reinforce the corner joints.

 

These are sockets for TEOTL

 

IMG_7978.jpg

Edited by Giles
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Thanks Giles, think I'll be copying your way of jointing the blades.

 

Foam baseboards still seems a bit of a 'dark art' to me, but I can see the benefits of using them. One to try in future

 

Cheers,

Andrew

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I've been laying track..... it's a bit extreme in places..... 0-4-0's and large buffers are certainly the order of the day.

 

I've gone to some trouble to make sure the track is level (thanks to a spirit level app on my Iphone!) with jacking and packing, but of course there has always been the complexity of the siding off the incline (where the Fowler is shown. This was all laid level, but when a wagon was tried over it, it rocked, so one side had to be lifted out of level to cure the rocking as much as possible....

 

The Garratt should have no trouble, as I articulated both engines thoroughly in anticipation of this very situation - in fact it should rock-'n'-roll very nicely!

I haven't done any electrics yet, as I shall finish the laying and get the board on legs first.

 

IMG_2936_zpsyfbnzlkj.jpg

 

IMG_2930_zpsd4pdyepg.jpg

 

IMG_2931%20-%20Copy_zpse3ltsofy.jpg

 

IMG_2932%20-%20Copy_zpsqwiz1izq.jpg

Edited by Giles
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Surely you can fit your tried and tested R/C and do away with the electrics, Giles ;)

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Well I could..... But on the whole it's easier to just wire it up! (And save the RC for the lorries!). This way I get the sound - simply - when I want it as well...... Bear in mind I've got yet another hand-held controller for the crane as well, so there's plenty of stuff to have in one's hands.

RC locos could still be run, of course!

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That gradient change looks just like the sort of thing the garratts were designed to do, there's a photo of the Sneyd colliery garratt on just such a gradient change, and the jointed point blade - very prototypical industrial pointwork! Just needs some nice weighted throw-over levers and they'd be perfect.

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Hi Pete - yes it is! I did very much want to emphasise the different levels, and to 'notice' the gradient (all in an 8' length) so the result was inevitable. Since there won't be much track, I've got to give it interest where I can!

 

It all adds to the fun (and it justifies handling a couple of wagons at a time....)

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…….(thanks to a spirit level app on my Iphone!)…...

 

WAY TOO MUCH INFORMATION!!!!!!!!!!!  (for us non-techie dinosaurs)  :jester:  

Edited by Osgood
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Still watching with interest. The C&L track looks superior to my eye, also. 

 

That gradient is going to be a nice feature, but I wonder if it would look a little more prototypical if the gradient change were a more gentle on the section your 0-4-0DM and wagon are positioned over? 

 

Just a thought, and as you say, space is at a premium here. 

 

Paul A. 

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That's why I was showing the worst-case scenario! The transition from main line up the gradient is positively angelic..... But that one is awkward....

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Garratt  'at home' for the first time.....  (showing why you need a Garratt....)

 

IMG_2941_zpschedqqvo.jpg

 

IMG_2943_zpspkmokkes.jpg

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I got things wired up today (in a very basic way!) which allowed me to test things out under their own power.

 

Much to my relief there are no problems of any sort on anything that's laid so far (and the worst is laid.....). The Garratt has no problems with that difficult transition on to that siding. The Fowler doesn't even notice it...... The Pug is happy with it, but the big surprise that I really wasn't expecting is that the Ixion Hudswell Clarke just about copes with it. If you look closely, the centre drivers have air beneath them at times, but it stays on the track 100% of the time. The only loco I have (other than big beasties) which is a 'no-go' is my 04 whose guard irons foul. I have no problem with this, as it has no right to be up there - it can stay on BR metals, with the 37 and Ivatt.......

 

The gradient isn't a problem either, so we'll have a play and see how far we can push things, as my preference is to use graphite on the rails for conductivity etc.. Also being a lubricant, the will be a balance to be had - so we will have to find it!

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That Garratt looks so good on that incline. I like the way the 37 is looking on in envy!

Bob

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Indeed! I gather a number of industrial sites went to 1:10, with even short stretches of 1:8!!! (steam hauled)

 

 

Here's things actually moving....

 

 

 

Edited by Giles
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The colliery branch on my Cwm Bach layout is a gentle 1:22 or thereabouts.

post-13142-0-08410400-1426860447_thumb.jpg

post-13142-0-83768700-1426860451_thumb.jpg

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In all probability, when the graphite goes on!

 

Chris, I think your sedate 1:22 is probably more in keeping with the tone of your environment! - I do like it! I just can't resist working the hell of of the Garratt.... plus I've only got 8' to play with!

Still, if ever you need a Garratt to visit the Valleys........

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This point is going to be tramway'd in (it's the copper pax one....). There is also a lot of air underneath it (between double packed sleepers etc..) in order to get reasonably smooth vertical transitions! I've therefore back-filled it with foam, which I've then cut back to sleeper level. This will then get a layer of air-dry clay, embossed with sets (with PVA to bond clay to foam)

 

4B2CB59F-A71F-4E66-9AD0-6FF57637ADF8_zps

 

The best foam I've found is delightfully the cheapest, at under £6 per can from screwfix. It dries quickly, and is nice and dense, carving well. Much better than some of the more expensive foams I've used...

 

5C68A84D-A6CE-4AB4-950B-E17A15A228D5_zps

Edited by Giles
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