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Mikkel

Pragmatic Pre-Grouping - Mikkel's Workbench

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Excellent again Mikkel.  When you said that he has been trimmed to give him the 1900s look, where did you trim?  I assume that he is the correct height as I think I have one Dart figure that is a scale 7ft tall.  (He is cleaning a window so he has to be!)

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Even though Jack has a new head, he still has a very 'world-weary' look.  Perhaps his mood is not helped by having been doused in what looks like china-clay slurry?

 

Well spotted Mike. The slightly sad look is exactly the reason that Jack was, er, head hunted for this figure. He is a veteran of two wars but I think there must be a more tangible cause of his melancholia.

 

The china clay slurry is less of an issue, it will be cleaned up before painting.

 

 

Excellent again Mikkel.  When you said that he has been trimmed to give him the 1900s look, where did you trim?  I assume that he is the correct height as I think I have one Dart figure that is a scale 7ft tall.  (He is cleaning a window so he has to be!)

 

Hi Chris, I agree that the Dart figures are generally larger than the Stadden ones. The Dart body I used here (ref MSV13) is fortunately not so tall, but I still tried to shrink it a bit by trimming the sides and fitting some lower shoes. 

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I like the finished model Mikkel and especially the way you have interchanged parts of the figures, I have the loco crews that came in parts from Andrew Stadden and thought at the time that they would have other uses.

 

Do you remember my little scratchbuilt wheelbarrow, it had an accident and got flattened by a large pile of card and now rests broken in the old Refreshment room, ah well I'll just have to build another sometime.

 

Jim

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Hi Jim, I do like these little figure-making projects. In my view, if the purpose of modelling is to relax and make something, then it doesn't really matter how big the project is.

 

Your wheelbarrow was a great example of that. A shame it was flattened. For those who haven't seen it: http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/60803-hemyock-down-on-the-farm/?p=1315690

 

I have been wondering if there was a standard design of GWR wheebarrow. Even Stephen Williams in his GWR branchline modelling books seems to have come up short on that one, although he provides a photo of one type seen at a GWR station for inspiration (in vol 2). 

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And a similar LNWR barrow at Liverpool Lime Street in 1901.
(Part LNWRS reference LS110 - Crewe Official C699). Copied from LNWRSoc., Facebook page.

 

post-6979-0-02035800-1523378742_thumb.jpg

Edited by Penlan
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Roxey Mouldings have something similar in the Southwark Bridge Models range. I have built several of these items and they are excellent kits

 

http://www.roxeymouldings.co.uk/category/87/4mm-scale-/-00-gauge-southwark-bridge-models-accessories/

 

They look good, a better bet than the Langley etch I think.  Craig showed his neat build of the Roxey/Southwark GWR barrow in an earlier post: http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/97672-pragmatic-pre-grouping-mikkels-workbench/?p=3015981

 

 

And a similar LNWR barrow at Liverpool Lime Street in 1901.

(Part LNWRS reference LS110 - Crewe Official C699). Copied from LNWRSoc., Facebook page.

 

attachicon.gifLiverpool Lime Street.jpg

 

What a photo!

 

Incidentally I wonder what he's doing? 

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What a photo!

 

Incidentally I wonder what he's doing? 

He's working on the Virgin remodelling of Lime Street; still not finished.

 

And note also the GWR Clerestorey deep in LNWR territory (and of course the lamps!)

Edited by Brassey

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Today we welcome John Pidger in our midst.

 

Head transposed from a seated Andrew Stadden figure to the body of a footplate man.
 
40660405794_7c030b64fc_c.jpg

 

 

 

Legs bent backwards and feet bent up, to produce a backward lean.
 
41330889152_cc006e8d38_c.jpg

 

 

 

Arms at the ready.
 
40660500364_f6038f93c8_c.jpg

 

 

 

Baskets from an excellent Preiser kit, sadly discontinued last time I looked.

 

39564731550_36f3432608_c.jpg

 

 

 

Painted basket and contents.
 
40660519724_187089e6a1_c.jpg

 

 

 

John Pidger ready for painting.
 
40479183165_5dae040d29_c.jpg

 

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Excellent 'cut and shut' job there! results in a very realistic pose.

 

David

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Oh, I expect you all know the old "stealing wheelbarrows" tale.  Many versions abound, but I think it might make a nice basis for one of Mikkels wonderful cameo stories..... 

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Excellent 'cut and shut' job there! results in a very realistic pose.

 

David

 

Thanks David. He actually breaks my old rule that layout figures should be in relaxed poses. But as long as it's no more than this I suppose it will be OK.

 

 

Oh, I expect you all know the old "stealing wheelbarrows" tale.  Many versions abound, but I think it might make a nice basis for one of Mikkels wonderful cameo stories..... 

 

I didn't know that one, thanks Dave. Somehow I feel this connects to the stolen platform bench theme that I think we discussed earlier!

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He could be about to lift the basket off a wagon, so not actually moving.

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Mikkel,

Just brilliant again

I have always hesitated about actually taking a saw/knife/bloodied finger to a Stadden figure as they are pewter not whitemetal.  It would be the answer to, as the H0 locomen are not out yet, the problem of the signal lad.  The perfect H0 figure for it has a full beard!  I can see someone, or two, losing their heads.  The possibilities are endless.  (Stop it!  Stop it! I have coaches to build, lots of them, too many of them.)

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And a similar LNWR barrow at Liverpool Lime Street in 1901.

(Part LNWRS reference LS110 - Crewe Official C699). Copied from LNWRSoc., Facebook page.

 

attachicon.gifLiverpool Lime Street.jpg

 

What a photo!

 

Incidentally I wonder what he's doing? 

 

Possibly picking up 'night-soil'?

 

Interesting! If so, I hope he had a lid of some sort for the wheelbarrow  :)

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He could be about to lift the basket off a wagon, so not actually moving.

 

Good idea Stu. Or waiting for some chatterbox to finish so he can get back to work.

 

 

Mikkel,

Just brilliant again

I have always hesitated about actually taking a saw/knife/bloodied finger to a Stadden figure as they are pewter not whitemetal.  It would be the answer to, as the H0 locomen are not out yet, the problem of the signal lad.  The perfect H0 figure for it has a full beard!  I can see someone, or two, losing their heads.  The possibilities are endless.  (Stop it!  Stop it! I have coaches to build, lots of them, too many of them.)

 

Thanks Chris, I warn you it can be addictive. But we'd rather see the coaches after all  :)

 

It doesn't always work out though. This gent is resisting manipulation. I hear they're hiring at the Ministry of Silly Walks.

 

27524575968_415dd2c2ef_c.jpg

Edited by Mikkel
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Thanks Ken, that's useful. I have had similar forays into the online world of the grafitti community. I found a lot of praise for "Montana" cans, but the nozzles clogged up on me very fast despite the usual precautions. There were extra nozzles included with the cans, so I may not be the only one! 

 

Liquitex Acrylic appealed to me as it is water based and went on nicely enough. I didn't go further with it as they didn't have quite the shade I was after (guess which one!), but might try it again if I need another shade at some point. 

 

30193702091_563b0f1485_o.jpg

post-18776-0-40227100-1523646244_thumb.jpegpost-18776-0-40227100-1523646244_thumb.jpegpost-18776-0-40227100-1523646244_thumb.jpegpost-18776-0-40227100-1523646244_thumb.jpeg
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I’m sorry but crashed and burned trying to attach a photo,

I was going to suggest Halfords Rover Brooklands Green, it sprays nicely and doesn’t clog. The trouble being that colour is always subjective and the lighting on a picture can change the shade so easily.

Again, sorry for the multiplicity,

Rich

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And a similar LNWR barrow at Liverpool Lime Street in 1901.

(Part LNWRS reference LS110 - Crewe Official C699). Copied from LNWRSoc., Facebook page.

 

attachicon.gifLiverpool Lime Street.jpg

 

Fascinating photo Penlan. Looking at the track you cannot make out any of the sleepers/timbers they all seem to be fully covered. As might be expected of the period the only switch blades visible indicate a heel switch and it may be a trick of the angle but the radii and the shortness of the switch blades indicate a fairly short turnout. There appears to have been a figure by the tiebar all fuzzy so probably moving about. Judging by that figure and the guy with the shovel it would seem the railway staff are happy to be wandering about the tracks despite the dangers. There would also appear to be some sort of material suspended out from the brake van any ideas.

 

Don 

 

edit re the distance effect if I spray a 7mm and a 2mm loco with the same paint what is the result?

Edited by Donw

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I’m sorry but crashed and burned trying to attach a photo,

I was going to suggest Halfords Rover Brooklands Green, it sprays nicely and doesn’t clog. The trouble being that colour is always subjective and the lighting on a picture can change the shade so easily.

Again, sorry for the multiplicity,

Rich

 

British Racing green is very close to Brunswick Green. One difference is the viewpoint we generally see real locos from a lower viewpoint than we see our models. There is also the effect of distance on colour which doesn't scale properly.

 

Don

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Back when Oi were a lad, we used'a call it British Grazing Green on account of any car painted in it usually came last...

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