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Sorting through some stock to loan for a 1900's Cornish based layout, came across these.....
They are made up liveries, but they did brighten up an otherwise dull looking Cornish Branch Line model a friend made 15+ years ago... ( I think it's that long ago).
I've already posted a picture of the Y2's waiting for Scilly Isles traffic, but will add them on here, then that's all my Cornwall related stock done.

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I was hoping you had information about actual Cornish POs. Rare as hen's teeth unfortunately.

There's only the Helston Gas Co., (that seems to get everywhere on models) that I'm aware of.

I think you will find that most coal arrived by sea, as indeed was most of the minerals were exported that way to.

There's the Great Grimsby something or the other that has Newlyn on the sides, I thought I had that one, but can't find it at present.

I admit it's not an area I have investigated to any degree, and I certainly haven't seen any photo's with identifiable Cornish PO's in, though I'm sure there are some.

Perhaps this will stir some into the limelight..

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The Great Grimsby Coal Salt and Tanning Co Ltd. To be found in Private Owner Wagons A Thirteenth Collection by Keith Turton, but not the livery you want. I rather think POWSIDES did a transfer for the one that mentions Newlyn but I can't recall offhand whether it was one of their limited edition jobs or mainstream. 

 

From what I can gather there were several of these companies - mostly based in Grimsby - that took coal to wherever the trawlers needed it, which was not necessarily their home port. One of them was the delightfully-named Worms and Co.

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There's only the Helston Gas Co., (that seems to get everywhere on models) that I'm aware of.

I think you will find that most coal arrived by sea, as indeed was most of the minerals were exported that way to.

There's the Great Grimsby something or the other that has Newlyn on the sides, I thought I had that one, but can't find it at present.

I admit it's not an area I have investigated to any degree, and I certainly haven't seen any photo's with identifiable Cornish PO's in, though I'm sure there are some.

Perhaps this will stir some into the limelight..

 

While you are quite correct to say that most coal came into Cornwall by sea, and much of the clay and other minerals went out the same way, there were various PO wagons in the Duchy. Many of the clay companies had their own wagons – John Lovering had a small batch that can be modelled using the Slaters kit. English China Clays had both coal and clay wagons plus wagons from various coal factors could be seen – there are photos of Bodmin General taken in 1925 showing a couple of Renwick Wilton wagons, 3 ECC coal wagons and a wagon belonging to New Rock Colliery in Somerset.

 

There is a Yahoo group devoted to Cornish China Clay branches for those who are interested.          

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