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Odd wagons of the UK


844fan
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On 16/06/2021 at 11:25, Mark Saunders said:

The Derwenthaugh traffic was coke to Wakefield for the local hospital and was carried on FEW’s . 
The  Boulby traffic was salt to Middlesbrough Goods plus at one stage a small fleet of PFA’s as in the one at the top using former tank chassis!

They also worked in South Wales where some, at least, of the 4-wheel conversions were done. 

Three collections visible via https://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/?q=cobra

 

Paul

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5 hours ago, montyburns56 said:

 

 

Ahh right, so it's Boplates that they are sat on. i was wondering what they were.

I helped someone measure the former Cobra wagons in Tees Yard/ Middlesboro Goods back in 1987. I recollect the wagons were 'Boplates' in origin, but they had come to be container carriers by a variety of routes. Some had been straight conversions, some had been Boflats, whilst some had been built as replacements for 4-wheel wagons on the Condor service.

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On 14/06/2021 at 19:44, montyburns56 said:

These these aren't that odd as they were KAA wagons, but the trailers definitely are. Apparently they were built for a Blue Circle flow from Westbury to Southampton in the early 2000s.

 

 

 

 

 

SMI-22-L5-037

 

This one is interesting as the last three wagons seem to have something different on them.

 

 

 

 

I believe all bar one ended up in Europe.

The solitary UK example in use as an equipment carrier at the former RTC yard at Derby - it has made the odd foray to/from Barrow Hill.

 

STOCK 96801 DERBY 20160122 viewed from passing on 222005

 

A Genesis kit. (Pic by Andy Y/BRM)

Detail_6.jpg.917cf1c68ab20153f51775e71c11876e.jpg

 

The wagon behind is a former MEA, now used for carrying test load weights at the RTC site.

I believe some of the KAAs have just returned to the UK in the past month or so. Now coded IXA

Edited by newbryford
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7 minutes ago, Hippel said:

Curious when you look at the builders plate with a B prefix number and built at Lancing in 1956? 

 

Paul

Ferry open built for BR - the air brakes fitted for ferry traffic helped it survive no doubt.

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Some were also painted in the red/grey Railfreight colours, coded OJX or OJA if air brake only. Peco do this wagon in N, but the Railfreight version is coded OBA! They did do a GW version too, though it came out before the prototypes did.

Edited by BernardTPM
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13 hours ago, montyburns56 said:

owned by Procor hence the markings, used as Match wagons and coded as PXQ.

Yep, buckeye couplings at the other end, to allow movement of buckeye fitted wagons in the Mendip area to be taken to Radstock for maintenance, from memory.

 

Jo

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The photo shows them stabled at Westbury @Wickham Green too, so who knows what else was on that siding! Procor owned the ex steel tipplers used by Yeoman and ARC, as well as the KEA wagons and countless others used in the area. I'd imagine it'd be BR staff shunting the trains together, and Marcroft doing the maintenance. If it's anything like today, VTG own the wagons but it's up to the people leasing the wagons to shunt them etc. 

For example currently, boxes are leased from VTG, sets planned by DB, shunted by DB shunters and drivers, cripples knocked out and maintained by DB Cargo Maintenance (formerly known as Axiom Rail, and before that Marcroft). VTG planners may request vehicles be knocked out for maintenance, but they don't have operational staff to do the shunting etc.

 

Jo

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18 minutes ago, Wickham Green too said:

Presumably, being Procor vehicles, B.R. staff - or whoever they were at the time - weren't allowed to use them ..... hence the need for a separate brake van ( to the left ).

They were no longer brake vans, simply Coupling Adapter wagons. Further wagons of this type were to be found on Teesside, and possibly also in South Wales. Some had had the body removed, leaving a flat floor with a brake standard in the middle.

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26 minutes ago, Fat Controller said:

They were no longer brake vans, simply Coupling Adapter wagons. Further wagons of this type were to be found on Teesside, and possibly also in South Wales. Some had had the body removed, leaving a flat floor with a brake standard in the middle.

The LMS ones retained their bodies and the BR ones stripped with only the brake remaining with added handrails!

 

Not to be confused with the six LMS ones used as spacer wagons with the Cargo Fleet to Consett Torpedo movement.

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2 minutes ago, Mark Saunders said:

The LMS ones retained their bodies and the BR ones stripped with only the brake remaining with added handrails!

 

Not to be confused with the six LMS ones used as spacer wagons with the Cargo Fleet to Consett Torpedo movement.

 

Is that what those ones with buckeyes that were in the west end were for?

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