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N Gauge Peco DCC Points On Elite


Poe

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Hello everyone, i have a few questions.

 

Can points be controlled via dcc with the Hornby elite?

 

if so what parts would i need?

 

I have 12 points will that be a problem?

 

Thanks guys.

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Yes, but it painful in the extreme to key in turnout instructions into an Elite.

And if using computer software, its bug ridden as the Elite will loose commands sent in close succession* (goodness knows how Hornby's own software manages).

 

If you want to proceed, you require accessory decoders for your point motors. Accessory decoders come in a variety of shapes and sizes, and costs. Some will control a single turnout motor, others four, and others eight, twelve or even sixteen. Some work with almost any type of turnout motor, others are specialised to work with specific turnout motors.

 

 

If you do it, and, if wanting computer software to control them (other than perhaps Hornby's own software), then I expect you will end up buying another DCC device to link to the computer which works reliably and doesn't loose commands randomly.

I ended up installing a Sprog to drive turnouts/signals from a computer running JMRI for someone I help out with his N gauge layout.

 

 

(* just perhaps the latest Hornby firmware for the Elite fixes this bug. I've not tried to find out. )

 

 

- Nigel

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I use Team Digital SMD82's on my N-gauge layout using the Elite and programmed them all OK as well.

They have been replaced with the SMD84 I think it is.

 

No problems at all.

 

Nigel I think the V1.4 firmware has improved that although I didn't have any problems before.

Now when you operate a turnout from the Elite you press one control knob to move the turnout one way and press the other control knob to turn it back.

 

Nigel the Hornby Software actually sends two signals to make sure the point has actually moved.

 

 

To be honest controlling the points via DCC isn't that bad, the problem is actually using a decent point motor!!

I used the peco low power type directly connected to the point, they throw with quite a thwack and if you have the switches glued to them they can come off.

As I've cut holes in the baseboards to accomodate the solenoid type motors it's a bit of a pain to try and alter them all.

If I was to do it again I would without doubt use the slow action motors in no particular order:- Cobalt, tortoise or Fulgerex(is that how it's spelt?)

 

Cheers

 

Ian

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If you have the Elite then you can use any accessory decoder.

 

If you do use the Hornby accessory decoder and use slow action motors you will need the R8247 as this can be programmed to have a longer pulse to move the motor across.

Normal solenoid type motors such as those from Hornby or Peco will need to be wired into the accessory decoder.

 

The accessory decoder has screw type terminals where the wires are connected it comes with a screwdriver which will fits the screw terminals.

 

If using Peco point motors you will need to solder wire to them.

If using Hornby point motors they already have the wire ready connected.

 

Cheers

 

Ian

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Nigel the Hornby Software actually sends two signals to make sure the point has actually moved.

 

 

Thanks for the information.

 

I tried the same kludge in other software, and whilst it increased reliability, it was still not 100%, and additional code delays between commands were also required to be certain that the Elite had enough time to complete commands. Changing a three aspect colour light signal with this method gives a terrible end result; either two lights illuminated together, or one light goes out, wait a while and then the next comes on.

 

- Nigel

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If you have the Elite then you can use any accessory decoder.

 

If you do use the Hornby accessory decoder and use slow action motors you will need the R8247 as this can be programmed to have a longer pulse to move the motor across.

Normal solenoid type motors such as those from Hornby or Peco will need to be wired into the accessory decoder.

 

The accessory decoder has screw type terminals where the wires are connected it comes with a screwdriver which will fits the screw terminals.

 

If using Peco point motors you will need to solder wire to them.

If using Hornby point motors they already have the wire ready connected.

 

Cheers

 

Ian

 

Thanks very much ian thats cleared it up for me.

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