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4 wheel Grain Hoppers on the GWR


kandc_au

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Hi all,

I think the headings have asked it all in a way.

What I am looking for is info on how grain was transported by the GWR!

I understand that there were 4 wheeled hoppers but I have not seen any reference to where they ran, the equipment / buildings etc that were used.

Where was it carried from and to?

Anything else that members think is relevent.

 

Thanks for any and all responses

 

Khris

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Guest dilbert

The bulk grain hoppers were built essentially for the transport of imported grain from port to wherever the content was to be processed, .e.g. Birkenhead to Wrexham.

 

Three diagrams : V10 (1 built), V20 (12 built) and V25 (12 built). Dia. V20 were converted for bulk cement traffic in the 1903s before being converted back for grain traffic, this time as dia V29 (minus the side doors) in 1939/40. Loading was done via a hatch in the roof (dia V20) and 2 hatches on dia V29.

 

Most grain traffic appears to have been carried in sacks on sheetted opens or in MINK vans... dilbert

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In latter years, it was transported in purpose built hopper wagons.

The first type ( Dia V20, built 1927) had wooden bodies, and two pairs of side doors, which meant they could be used as ordinary vans when there was no grain traffic. The doors were soon sealed, the wagons being transferred to bulk cement traffic from Aberthaw in 1930. In 1940, they were returned to grain traffic, with the side doors being replaced by planking. The rebuild was covered by Diagram V29. These wagons were originally branded for use between Birkenhead Docks and Wrexham.

The second type (Dia V25, 1935/6) had a steel body, but without the outside steel reinforcement of the LMS types. They were originally for use between Avonmouth Docks and Uffculme, on the Hemyock branch.

The total number of wagons was small (12 wagons of each type), in comparison with the LNER and LMS fleets, as the GWR didn't serve any major grain producing areas.

There are numerous photos, including a few detail shots of both types, in 'Freight Wagons and Loads in Service on the Great Western Railway and British Rail,Western Region' by J H Russell, published by OPC/Haynes

(ISBN 086093 155 2)

Page 184 of 'A History of GWR Goods Wagons' by Atkins, Beard, Hyde and Tourret (ISBN 0 7153 8725 1) has drawings for both types, including the later rebuilds to V29.

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Pre WWI, in 1905, an experimental grain wagon was built Dia V10 was a standard box van similar to Dia V5 but built on a double chassis with a false hinged floor above the hopper and a sliding door in the roof. Intended for dual use the experiment was deemed a failure and the rest of the order L500 was cancelled.

 

Prior to this and afterwards until after WWI grain on the GWR was carried in sacks in sheeted Opens or in MINKS

 

In 1918, there was another experiment with bulk grain. 25 standard covered goods vans were ordered to be converted for grain. This was so successful that they never went into service - a drawing exists (56681) but they were never given a diagram number.

 

Pre WWII, in 1925, the GWR had an experiment with hoppers as multipurpose design. Diag O25 opens, 6 of them, were built with a hopper floor to the standard open wagon and a patented design folding floor above the floor. They could then be used for either grain or other open freight. The experiment, as with so many, was a failure or rather it was not adopted. In the early 1930's 3 of them had their hoppers removed and in the other three the trap doors were bolted down returning the wagons to standard opens.

 

In 1927, yet another go. 12 vans were built to Dia V20. This time the design was a partial success though once again they were built as 'convertible' and the demand for bulk grain simply did not materialise. By the early 1930's all 12 had been converted for bulk cement use. (V29 - out of sequence Diag). In 1939 one was converted back to bulk grain, with the others in 1940.

 

The GWR signal code for grain traffic prior to WWII was GRANO and post WWII reorganisation GRAIN. There are more details of the V20 alterations and diagrams in the usual sources Atkins, Beard, Tourret, Russell

 

Remember that virtually all bulk grain traffic came to a halt in 1935 until post nationalisation (import restrictions).

 

[Ed.] sorry for the duplication I'm just a slower typist and I got sidetracked. BTW there was quite a reasonable thread back on a previous version of RMWeb.

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Brian and Dilbert thank you for that.

What about unloading these wagons.

Nowadays we use conveyors where the grain is dumped into pits with conveyors taking it up in the silo's.

What was done in days of old?

Were they unloaded into pits?

Inside covered buildings or lean to's?

 

The questions keep coming!!

 

Khris

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V29 hopper converted from the Parkside kit. The model still needed the 'To work between Birkenhead and Wrexham' lettering adding.

 

grainvan1_zpsa5d4df51.jpg

 

Thanks to Phil Parker for letting me photograph it on his diorama.

 

There are lots of pictures of the overhead dockside loading and underneath discharge arrangements for these wagons in one of the GWR wagon books. I only have photocopies of the relevant pages but I'm sure someone will know what it is.

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Guest dilbert

Tourret Publishing 1998 tome of GW Wagons (the 2.5kg paperweight edition) states :

 

(of the V20) Discharge could be by a suction pipe through the top hatch or throught the bottom of the hoppers into a chute or a belt conveyor."

 

The only photos I've found are using the hoppers for discharging the cargo - I assume that gravity would have been the preferred method... dilbert

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Tourret Publishing 1998 tome of GW Wagons (the 2.5kg paperweight edition) states :

 

 

 

The only photos I've found are using the hoppers for discharging the cargo - I assume that gravity would have been the preferred method... dilbert

Perhaps the 'suction' method was for use at ports, where there probably wasn't a discharge pit available, but where the suction equipment was present for unloading ships?

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Guest dilbert

FC, I was referring to the discharging the vans (though rereading my post it does come across as ambiguous)... there is a photo in the aforementioned GWW which shows loading of a V20 at Birkenhead. A square/rectangular funnel placed on the roof hatch and a dockside crane equipped with a bulk grab had just emptied its contents into the funnel... dilbert

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FC, I was referring to the discharging the vans (though rereading my post it does come across as ambiguous)... there is a photo in the aforementioned GWW which shows loading of a V20 at Birkenhead. A square/rectangular funnel placed on the roof hatch and a dockside crane equipped with a bulk grab had just emptied its contents into the funnel... dilbert

I was also thinking of discharging in the unlikely event of the GWR actually exporting grain.

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Somewhere on this version of RM Web is a thread about unloading.

 

A pit with a funnel/hopper and a series of screws to get it to a conveyor/elevator was the answer.

 

I have gone for a Peco inspection pit kit which will get a couple of funnels added to some round tube. Funnel centres will be the length of a GRANO apart ie, two GRANOs can be parked over the funnels and unloaded simultaneously.

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