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Murphy's Law of Model Railways.


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I would assume that most people know what Murphy's Law is. Surely there must be some for model railways.

 

I have one to start:

-An opinion of how to clean track given by one esteemed member will be contrasted by an equal and opposite opinion of how to clean track by another esteemed member.

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There was a list of about 10 of them in RM in the 1980s. I can't remember them all and the mag isn't to hand but it was things like:

 

Any component when dropped will always roll into the leat accessible corner of the workshop.

- If it is heavy, it will hit your toe first

- It will be the most delicate component

- It will be the component that has taken longest to make

- When you find it, it will be by treading on it

- You will find it immediately after making a new one.

 

 

The only tin of paint of the correct colour has dried up.

 

Your only number 80 drill will always snap at 6pm on a Saturday (this was in the days of no Sunday trading!).

 

It works much better if you plug it in.

 

The layout's electrics will always fail just after the club electrician has gone for lunch

- The pub doesn't close till 3pm.

 

etc

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You can run your layout perfectly for hours before a group of people come over to see it. The moment the first visitor comes into the room, something will derail, short out, or otherwise cause a minor disaster!

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You can run your layout perfectly for hours before a group of people come over to see it. The moment the first visitor comes into the room, something will derail, short out, or otherwise cause a minor disaster!

The number of faults being directly proportional to the number of viewers. :)

 

- A train will always derail at the least accessible part of the layout.

 

- Any electrical component protected by a fast-burning fuse will protect the fuse by blowing first.

 

- The human body contains 6 litres of blood, 99% of which is located in your left thumb when using a #11 blade.

 

- The loco/coach/etc you've wanted for 20 years will become available commercially one month after you've finished scratchbuilding it.

 

Cheers

David

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All the below are from personal "Murphy's Law experiences...

 

No matter how much you mix to exactly the correct consistency, the amount of paint mixed for your airbrush job will equal 98% of what you actually need.

 

The size and seriousness of any derailment is proportionate to the importance of the person you are trying to impress with your layouts normally excellent running.

 

The darker the bit of undried paint on your model that your thumb finds , the lighter the next place on your model that your thumb touches will be.

 

The more accurate you claim your model is, the more people will notice the glaring mistake you hadn't previously noticed.

 

No passenger in your coach will come unstuck from their seat until the last clip/screw is fastened.

 

Any carefully positioned item glued on will remain perfectly aligned until just before the glue sets.

 

Jon F.

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I'll add my least favorite one of these:

 

No matter how well your stock runs, it will derail when you least expect it at the local club causing major problems.

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The tube of glue - posh stuff, GS Hypo Cement "For Fine Detail Work", which is only a couple of years old, and you know you haven't opened it because the cardboard box is sealed - that seems ideal for attaching that etched grill to the front of your RTR 1930s French railcar, turns out, after 5 minutes of trying, to be somewhere between empty and dried up. So you grudgingly open a new tube of cheapo supeglue - and guess what, that's dry too.

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That extra siding that you decide to install will need a point motor and it's directly over a baseboard support.

 

When you knock over your bottle of Mek, it will splash over the most expensive piece of rolling stock that you have and dissolve the paint.

 

You will always have an 8 pin decoder in stock when your latest model needs a 21 pin (and vice versa).

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No matter how carefully you plan that joint in the baseboard or crossmember it will always be in just the wrong place for the pointmotor etc above it.

 

You only ever where that woolly jumper on the day you have to reach over the layout to the far side

 

No matter how carefully you place something - its the first thing you knock over when your attention is elsewhere.

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The part or tool you haven't needed, but have seen in your spares/ tool box the last 50 times you've opened it, will be nowhere to be found when you actually want it.

 

John

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Spend loadsamoney on expensive etched kits only to find 'HornBach' announcing/producing one. I'm on the eighth one so far! :rolleyes:

 

I am surprised that this wasn't the first one out of the blocks. To which should be added;

 

When the model I have wanted for XX years (fill in as applicable) is produced by Bachpolby, it is the wrong livery, number or version.

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