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So this is how you buy a locomotive


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I would think buying a loco would be the easy (and probably the cheapest) bit...

 

You then have to find a new home for it and move it (probably by road = very expensive) and then you've got to think about restoration/maintenance etc etc...

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Competition rules enforced by the ORR state that a company such as DBS must offer their disposable redundant stock via competitive tender. This followed complaints from smaller open access operators and preservationists after a number of quite decent items ended up going straight to the scrappers.

As such lists like this are common in this day and age.

 

C6T.

 

 

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Competition rules enforced by the ORR state that a company such as DBS must offer their disposable redundant stock via competitive tender. This followed complaints from smaller open access operators and preservationists after a number of quite decent items ended up going straight to the scrappers.

As such lists like this are common in this day and age.

 

C6T.

 

my experience is that the majority of rare/interesting items of stock are always saved (certainly in the past say 15 years) - the last Queen Mary brake van in mainline operational service sold a while ago for a tidy sum.

 

All the spares which people may seek to complete their own preserved loco are readily available off the shelf (removed from previously scrapped examples) from a few companies/individuals, so there if often no need to purchase another "for spares" - and no guarantee that said parts won't be equally worn

 

disposing of a (in some cases) working locomotive, or one which has only has a minor affliction is a truth of modern business - the highest bidder gets it, end of.

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Competition rules enforced by the ORR state that a company such as DBS must offer their disposable redundant stock via competitive tender. This followed complaints from smaller open access operators and preservationists after a number of quite decent items ended up going straight to the scrappers.

 

Of course there is no requirement to dispose of locomotives straight away so a few years in open storage did wonders for their re-sale potential to other operators and cost DBS nothing as they owned outright the locomotives and the yards they sat in.

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There is an expensive prairie kettle going on the DVR for £250k. I looked at 5" gauge locos, real steam or electric for the price of a second hand car, very tempting.

 

As long as you know you're buying a good one, the model engineering scales do look like good value compared to smaller live steam such as a decent SM32 loco from £500. It's just finding somewhere to store and run it...

 

I think scrap diesels are going for the mixed metals price of around £200 per ton, transport costs have to be budgeted in but there might be some payback from selling useable spares. I also recall reading the price for a poor restorable class 56 diesel was around £50k.

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Porterbrook sold it, and yes it did sell, but I can't remember to whom. It went for approx market rate. It was part of an awareness raising initiative at the time - use them or lose them. Same reason as the unique 12140 was publicly scrapped - an SO fitted with non-standard bogies - in front of invited press, as a timed and videoed 'event.'

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It was bought by the Caledonian Railway for £2k. We used it for a few years as a static catering coach (it was air braked, of course, and we couldnt use it in a train), until a mainline operator came knocking on our door. By this time we had disocvered that the design of the Mk3 was not conducive to static operation (it seems it doesnt like water collecting on the roof).

 

We sold it for a tidy sum, plus a Mk2 RFO in return.

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I also recall reading the price for a poor restorable class 56 diesel was around £50k.

Pay that much (for a poor one) and you've been robbed, though some of the 56s sold in the last 'Great Grid Sell-off' by DBS might've been near that figure for, various reasons.

I believe, for various other reasons, an 08 might fetch this sort of price. Making them, per ton, the priciest "previously owned" diesel locos to buy by far.

 

C6T.

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