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Re-railing Australian Style


Baby Deltic

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  • RMweb Gold

Great stuff although I'm not sure if they entirely understood the principle - you should be able to do it without a convenient solid concrete foot crossing but solely with judicious use of timber packing and old fishplates or bits of sheet steel, they appeared to have forgotten the fishplates and din't have a solid enough run of wood packing.

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Great stuff although I'm not sure if they entirely understood the principle - you should be able to do it without a convenient solid concrete foot crossing but solely with judicious use of timber packing and old fishplates or bits of sheet steel, they appeared to have forgotten the fishplates and din't have a solid enough run of wood packing.

 

Presumably the idea was that, once you got the wheels above rail level, the track gauge would 'spring back' to normal. It just didn't work though.

 

My difficulty is that the caption said it occurred at low speed. How do you manage to derail a loco and eleven bogie wagons before you notice something is wrong?

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  • RMweb Gold

Presumably the idea was that, once you got the wheels above rail level, the track gauge would 'spring back' to normal. It just didn't work though.

 

My difficulty is that the caption said it occurred at low speed. How do you manage to derail a loco and eleven bogie wagons before you notice something is wrong?

 

Nice powerful diesel with a lot of grunt and you can get an awful long way with part of the train off the road - back in the 1970s I saw one train off the road where a wagon (a 21ton hopper) had been dragged on it side for more than a couple of wagon lengths, the one behind it was completely upside down and must have done at least a wagon length in that state and a couple in front of it had bits of tangled track wrapped round their underframes; all a heck of a drag but the loco had carried on until the sheer weight of what was behind it simply overpowered it. And before you ask I got there about 20 minutes after the derailment and the train pipe was still showing 18 inches of vacuum, the brake had not applied at any time and the loco was just being held on the straight air brake.

 

Incidentally pulling back - as in the film depends on the wheels riding up at the point where the gauge hasn't spread - that's where you put the timber and fishplates and you can see the wheels coming up onto the railhead and then dropping away.

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Do they not have rerailing frogs?

 

If you put a come along between the camera side of the frame and and the truck side on the off side and than cinch it up it will cause the truck to slew towards the near rail.

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  • RMweb Gold

Do they not have rerailing frogs?

 

If you put a come along between the camera side of the frame and and the truck side on the off side and than cinch it up it will cause the truck to slew towards the near rail.

 

They used to be quite common in Britain although I knew a number of older(whenI was younger) folk who were not at all keen on using them as they were heavy great things to lug about and they were a lot harsher on everything than bits of timber with the usual consequence of broken chairs. I recall one yard where there was a set very firmly rusted to the ground where they were stored while the Yard Manager lived up to his nickname and relied entirely on sprags and fishplates for rerailing.

 

I can understand they would be less likely to cause damage on flat bottom rail but I don't know if they ever been used in Australia.

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Nice powerful diesel with a lot of grunt and you can get an awful long way with part of the train off the road - back in the 1970s I saw one train off the road where a wagon (a 21ton hopper) had been dragged on it side for more than a couple of wagon lengths, the one behind it was completely upside down and must have done at least a wagon length in that state and a couple in front of it had bits of tangled track wrapped round their underframes; all a heck of a drag but the loco had carried on until the sheer weight of what was behind it simply overpowered it. And before you ask I got there about 20 minutes after the derailment and the train pipe was still showing 18 inches of vacuum, the brake had not applied at any time and the loco was just being held on the straight air brake.

 

Incidentally pulling back - as in the film depends on the wheels riding up at the point where the gauge hasn't spread - that's where you put the timber and fishplates and you can see the wheels coming up onto the railhead and then dropping away.

 

I see what you are saying SM. I once went to a derailment which came to a stand at Tackley on the Banbury to Oxford line where a 12T Van had run derailed for about eight miles, it was on timber sleepers and clear of the fastenings. It only came to a stand after the derailed van encountered the crossovers at Tackley and things went haywire. On the OP video though, I would have assumed that the loco was the first thing to derail (inputting greater forces than an empty wagon) so how rough would the track have to be before the driver thought that riding on the chairs instead of the rail was rougher than normal. As you say though, we don't know if the driver bothered to apply the brakes.

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Depending of course on the speed, but a typical freight train traveling at 40-50 mph takes about its own length to stop. So if the train was going somewhere near that speed, and was a half mile long (2500 ft, 770 m) it could have taken that long to stop even with the brakes set.

 

You can tell it was on the ground for a while because the rail has burned/cut a slot in the pilot sheet.

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Depending of course on the speed, but a typical freight train traveling at 40-50 mph takes about its own length to stop. So if the train was going somewhere near that speed, and was a half mile long (2500 ft, 770 m) it could have taken that long to stop even with the brakes set.

 

You can tell it was on the ground for a while because the rail has burned/cut a slot in the pilot sheet.

 

Point taken. I know about stopping distances which is why I was querying the video caption that the derailment occurred at low speed.

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I see what you are saying SM. I once went to a derailment which came to a stand at Tackley on the Banbury to Oxford line where a 12T Van had run derailed for about eight miles, it was on timber sleepers and clear of the fastenings. It only came to a stand after the derailed van encountered the crossovers at Tackley and things went haywire. On the OP video though, I would have assumed that the loco was the first thing to derail (inputting greater forces than an empty wagon) so how rough would the track have to be before the driver thought that riding on the chairs instead of the rail was rougher than normal. As you say though, we don't know if the driver bothered to apply the brakes.

 

Just had a scan of the video, I think you are right, the first vehicle to de-rail looks like the loco (S303) however, it looks to me like it is only the trailing bogie. Note that in part of the film you can see another loco beyond it, I would go as far as to suggest that the S class was probably the third or forth loco in a consist and therefore had no crew aboard, those Grain trains tend to have 3-4 loco's hauling them, I would also suggest that it was at low spead as it looks as though it is in a yard somewhere.

 

Al.

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The concrete footway / rerailer....

 

I've seen those on a number of layouts normally by the entry/exit tracks to fiddle yards, the concrete being replicated in plastkard. :no:

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I have been involved in this type of re-railing on a couple of occasions in the distant past when we had some sidings at Foxfield that were well past their sell by date and one particularly had a convenient re-railing ramp and wooden packing handily placed just in case! It could have been made more difficult when it came to get the last few items out as we didn't dare send a loco down one particular road and roped the wagons out. Luckily they all came out without landing on good old English soil!

 

Oh and I can testify to the hernia inducing weight of the cast iron ramps :stinker:

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