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Why is the weather in the country so perversely bad ?


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Hi All,

 

It's mid-summer day.

 

It's ONLY 7:18pm.

 

and yet I'm forced to use 200ASA and a low shutter speed just to get a picture and have doctor it on the PC and still end up with a mediocre effort................ :banghead: :dontknow:

 

Anyway - Bittern approaching Manningford on the Berks & Hants in the gloom with 1Z80 Minehead - Victoria, however, it looked, sounded and smelt wonderful though.............enjoy

 

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To prevent this country's weather getting in the way of a decent picture folk needed plenty of practice as with everything else. This was why so many contributors to railway mags stuck with Tri-X black & white film for so long when most sensible folk had moved onto the slower colour slides. But the advent of digital SLR's changed all that. Hope you dont mind me messing about....

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Why didn't you push the ASA further? The thing I use gives good acceptable results up to 1600ASA.

 

I'm still using a 2004 vintage Sony DSC-828 - only 8MP and 800ASA max

 

Need to upgrade to something more modern and better and maybe in the digital SLR category - 50th B'day looming (need to persuade Mrs SM that I'm worth it :laugh: ) or do I still want that Heljan O gauge 31 ??

 

No problem Coach - meddle away..............

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You did so much better than me. Running late and pouring with rain...Ten minutes later and it was dark.

 

ISO1600, f2 and 1/320 passing Waterloo Road Crossing at Wokingham.

 

Picture has also been cropped to take line side boxes etc out of shot, so even more grainy....but it was going well and did sound good.

 

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Oh to be in England

Now that April's there,

And whoever wakes in England

Sees, some morning, unaware,

That the lowest boughs and the brushwood sheaf

Round the elm-tree bole are in tiny leaf,

While the chaffinch sings on the orchard bough

In England - now!

 

And after April, when May follows,

And the whitethroat builds, and all the swallows!

Hark! where my blossomed pear-tree in the hedge

Leans to the field and scatters on the clover

Blossoms and dewdrops - at the bent spray's edge -

That's the wise thrush; he sings each song twice over,

Lest you should think he never could recapture

The first fine careless rapture!

And though the fields look rough with hoary dew,

All will be gay when noontide wakes anew

The buttercups, the little children's dower

- Far brighter than this gaudy melon-flower

 

Now it's flaming June,

In Wigan and in Wick

It's pi**ing down as usual,

It really makes you sick !!

 

Last verse by Brit15

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Hi All,

It's mid-summer day.

It's ONLY 7:18pm.

and yet I'm forced to use 200ASA and a low shutter speed just to get a picture and have doctor it on the PC and still end up with a mediocre effort................ :banghead: :dontknow:

post-5198-0-39920100-1340305708_thumb.jpg

 

IMHO, you can't take a picture on a grey "summer" evening and expect the end result to match one taken on a bright sunny afternoon, no matter how much pp work is done. Southernman46's is a good effort and a worthwhile record of a pleasing scene. I prefer Gordon S's shot however, a dramatic composition which makes use of the adverse conditions. The loco is at the focal point, on intersecting thirds, charging out of the murk, filling the sky with its exhaust. The low colour saturation and lowered definition fit the viewer's expectations of the scene. Even the trees framing the picture help to concentrate attention on the train.

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Hey Pete it was beautiful blue skies and roasting here at 7.00 a.m. this morning - well roasting in a relative sense for the North East of Scotland - but I didn't see any A4's running by (I might have done back in 63' but not these days).... Weather and modern steam photographers is a sad reflection - not on the British weather, but the lack of steam workings co-inciding with the good weather when compared with the 60s - witness the fine shots of Barking Bill!

 

In the words of the Scottish bard on American Steam - fine weather sh$te engines! :)

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Thanks for the kind comment Bluebottle. I missed 'pole position' by a few seconds or so last night so had to take pics over the level crossing gate and had loads of line side stuff doing it's best to screw the focussing on the camera. I did find the video this morning posted on YouTube, which does show Bittern steaming like a good 'un through the pouring rain and failing light. Beautiful...

 

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Actually I've really liked the misty, wet, shots of Bittern!

 

Funnily enough I've never been interested in American steam much apart from some Pennsy stuff - which in design are close to later BR engines.

At least we now have some (read: a lot) of great diesels running around...

 

Best, Pete.

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Sorry Pete it really was an irreverent comment! I've a passion for some of the American steam - especially through the lens of O Winston Link from the 1950s - space to run anything befitting that defies me!

 

4573100431_51e801bb00_b.jpg

1955 ... O. Winston Link- street scene by x-ray delta one, on Flickr

 

It's great to see some of the shots on here making the best of a bad job (weather wise)!

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Rather than pushing ISO beyond the 1000 mark I'm going the other way and trying where possible to use ISO 100 as I feel the grain gets noticable and potentially results in images that would not reproduce well in print. Not tried the total extreme ISO 12800 on my camera!

 

Nice to see moving train photo in poor lighting conditions.

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Sorry Pete it really was an irreverent comment! I've a passion for some of the American steam - especially through the lens of O Winston Link from the 1950s - space to run anything befitting that defies

 

It's great to see some of the shots on here making the best of a bad job (weather wise)!

 

I bet OWL woke up the entire town with his barrage of flash lights for that photo, Bill.......

 

Best, Pete.

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Now you're talking. O Winston Link is one of my favourite photographers of old steam in the US. Mrs S bought me his book 'Steam, Steel and Stars' about 20 years ago and I was able to source poster size prints from the book from a company in Belgium. Five of them now adorn our stairwell and every time I look at them I see something new. His composition skills were outstanding and reading how he set up his equipment for flash photography is mind blowing. Using thousands of hard wired magnesium flash bulbs for just one shot beggars belief in these days of instant digital photography and Photoshop processing. If you love US railroads and black and white photography, I can really recommend the book.

 

http://www.google.co...iw=1249&bih=871

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I know it's kind of steered of the original post Gordon so apologies in advance - there was a fine TV documentary (probably on Horizon) several years ago centred around the production of that shot - and like today it was several weeks of planning, hours of preparation on the day, for tha one shot - fortunately it didn't rain!

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I have to say that my favourite OWL photo is the one of the woman and dog indoors with the engine going by just outside her window - at night!

 

I wonder how he knew when to press the shutter?

 

Best, Pete.

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Avoid arranging anything on Thursdays that is weather dependant - thats my day for trout fishing on the Rivers Wye or Usk. Its bound to chuck it down!

 

In the immortal words of Morecambe and Wise:

 

Its raining in Steyning

Its pouring in Goring

And its pretty wet in Lissingdown too!!!

 

Phil

 

Edited for typos.

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It was just as bad for diesels

 

19:27, 1/200s and 800ASA - and it had gotten lighter after the thunderstorm passed !

 

37610, T.S (Ted) Cassady 14.5.61-6.4.08, and 37605 on

1Q16, 19:02, Norwich Crown Point - East Ham Electric Maintenance Depot via Norwich station, test train

Gissing

21 June 2012

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Now you're talking. O Winston Link is one of my favourite photographers of old steam in the US. Mrs S bought me his book 'Steam, Steel and Stars' about 20 years ago and I was able to source poster size prints from the book from a company in Belgium. Five of them now adorn our stairwell and every time I look at them I see something new. His composition skills were outstanding and reading how he set up his equipment for flash photography is mind blowing. Using thousands of hard wired magnesium flash bulbs for just one shot beggars belief in these days of instant digital photography and Photoshop processing. If you love US railroads and black and white photography, I can really recommend the book.

 

http://www.google.co...iw=1249&bih=871

 

'The Last Steam Railroad in North America' is another OWL album worthy of a look and my liking and respect for his work explains why I still have a 2008 calendar on the back of the study door.

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The digital age has allowed me to recover some shots considered disasters not worth printing from 25 years ago.

 

The weather could be just as bad then, but I can't remember having the lights on in the house in the middle of the day in June so much before.

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