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WEST HIGHLAND CLASS 66 (734) DERAILMENT


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I was reading last night (WNXX) re the above crashing (it is believed into a landslip) and turning over onto it's side in a very remote part between Tulloch & Corrour. That should be a very very difficult recovery due to no roads nearby. It would be interesting to see some photos but these could be slow to emerge too due to the remoteness.

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66734 is down the bank apparently.

 

It's definitely down the bank, I've seen a picture but it's not available to everyone (yet) - Freightmaster on line members can view it.

 

The crew must have had a real scare, glad all got out Ok.

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http://www.wnxx.info/plogger/index.php?level=album&id=342

 

Considering that the loco has been thrown down an embankment (and thankfully managed to stop just short of that very large rock that is in front of it) it has held up well and done its job of protecting the crew from serious injury very well.

 

Getting it out of there is going to be a right job though!

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Rather speculative comment there...

 

It can be rescued, either winching it back up to track level back the way it came or by smaller rail mounted cranes bringing it up in parts, i.e. power units, hood sections, main body/chassis and bogies. Either way it is most certiantly not beyond rescue. Awkward yes but not beyond hope.

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Hi

First of all I am thankfull that the crew were unhurt badly shaken but otherwise ok the loco is recoverable but at what cost is the key question as

follows cost of getting lifting equipment to the area costs of recovery to get the loco possible hiring other locos cranes specialist crews etc etc

there are no roads close to this area.

this is against the value of the loco class 66's have been scrapped before after accident damage although they were indeed recovered.

 

Dave

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Good to hear no one was hurt and - provided the ground is stable underneath it doesn't look like too bad a recovery job if they use traditional techniques instead of going in for very large road cranes (which cost a mint and are difficult to get into position). Only thing is I wonder if any of the re-railers who are about nowadays understand anything about the old methods of rerailing something which has finished up in that position?

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Only thing is I wonder if any of the re-railers who are about nowadays understand anything about the old methods of rerailing something which has finished up in that position?

 

I remember reading about the recovery of a 31(?) that had gone down a bank somewhere (Western Region?). It was winched back onto the line with a variety of other locos - including one on an adjacent running rail as ballast weight to prevent one of the tracks that the winch was attached to, slewing sideways.

 

I realise that this is only a single track location, but what's to stop a couple of concrete piles being put in as winch anchor points? Surely cheaper than scrapping a full loco. Until damage to the loco is assessed and compared to the cost of recovery/repair, then at this point, all we are doing is speculating.

 

this is against the value of the loco class 66's have been scrapped before after accident damage although they were indeed recovered.

 

Dave

 

IIRC only one 66 has been scrapped so far - and that was severely damaged at the tragic accident at Heck. I believe the fate of 66048 is still uncertain. 66734 doesn't look too badly damaged (oops, there I go speculating again).

 

 

Mick

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I remember reading about the recovery of a 31(?) that had gone down a bank somewhere (Western Region?). It was winched back onto the line with a variety of other locos - including one on an adjacent running rail as ballast weight to prevent one of the tracks that the winch was attached to, slewing sideways.

Mick

When I was in South Wales we had a D68XX that was 'trapped' by a trap point and set off into the undergrowth down a bank although the rear bogie stayed, mainly, on the track. It took the Canton breakdown gang no more than 3-4 hours from arrival on site to departure to get the job done and we only stopped the adjacent line when we pulled it back just in case it toppled a bit; far simpler, cheaper, and quicker than messing about with a crane although there were times when their use was unavoidable. It wasn't the first loco to go down a bank and I doubt that the one in Scotland will be the last (although I obviously hope it will be).

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yes you are right Dave but bankers (the owners of the leasing compay) don't think in a logical manner like normal people.

 

Pete

 

More could be said about bankers .. and I don't mean the Lickey incline.

 

The insurance company will make the final decision, not the owners.

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A 66 costs several million, I doubt recovery will run to that much, some temporary rails, a good strong rope, a couple of 60s and ...

 

I wonder whether our famous health and safety would deem this way acceptable. It may have been done many times before without incident but something tells me the wont be overly happy. It looks like it could be a difficult area to get to whether it is for recovery or to be cut up. The main thing is nobody was injured but there could be much more to this tale as it develops.

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Rather speculative comment there...

 

It can be rescued, either winching it back up to track level back the way it came or by smaller rail mounted cranes bringing it up in parts, i.e. power units, hood sections, main body/chassis and bogies. Either way it is most certiantly not beyond rescue. Awkward yes but not beyond hope.

 

There are ways - I recall 31296(?) at Hanwell (?) using turfors and 6 class 47's and then 56062 at Copyhold Jn which also invovled welding a large frame on the side of the loco to give support whilst is was dragged back up, and 86209 near Tring (?) which involved laying a temporary road across a field

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I wonder whether our famous health and safety would deem this way acceptable. It may have been done many times before without incident but something tells me the wont be overly happy. It looks like it could be a difficult area to get to whether it is for recovery or to be cut up. The main thing is nobody was injured but there could be much more to this tale as it develops.

1. Look very carefully at site, and then,

2. Work out how you are going to do it and write a method statement and a 'suitable' risk assessment ensuring there is a very large pile of paperwork, then

3. Do the job

 

If any sort of inspecting type person arrives you can either

A. Direct them to the large pile of paperwork ('sorry it's not all on site you'll have to go to the steel rope manufacturer to read their specs and breaking strain test results, yes they are in Birmingham') and/or, in any order,

B. Politely point out to them that the worksite is outside their jurisdiction and the Regulations/legislation they are quoting are not applicable on a construction site/agricultural land/ are covered by the method statement etc (delete as applicable).

 

PS All of the above (Note *) is based on actually events at sites/incidents with some sort of railway involvement in teh period since privatisation etc.

 

Note * There is one exception - the bit about the steel rope manufacturer (you guessed) as in reality the load limits info was held in the Register of Loose Lifting Tackle (but that was somewhere else, not on site)

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A 66 costs several million

 

But it is the book (balance sheet) value that it is assessed against. If 8 years old then it will be about written off on the balance sheet and then it may be cheaper (and cheaper from a maintenance point of view) to buy a new one.

From an accountant's view there are many things to consider. Dismantling may provide economic spares, it might just be the right time to buy new or obtain finance cheaply .... then there is the problem of having the line closed for an extended period and lost revenue.

 

It might seem the easiest solution just to "simply" haul it out and get on with it, at least from the man at the track side's perspective..

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But it is the book (balance sheet) value that it is assessed against. If 8 years old then it will be about written off on the balance sheet and then it may be cheaper (and cheaper from a maintenance point of view) to buy a new one.

From an accountant's view there are many things to consider. Dismantling may provide economic spares, it might just be the right time to buy new or obtain finance cheaply .... then there is the problem of having the line closed for an extended period and lost revenue.

 

It might seem the easiest solution just to "simply" haul it out and get on with it, at least from the man at the track side's perspective..

 

I'm afraid you continually show lack of understanding, the accountants may write off the value but that is for TAX purposes, the loco is still an asset that the company requires for traffic purposes, just because an accountant has clawed back all the tax deductables possible does not make that need any less - or the cost of the replacement.

 

As I've already said the INSURERS will make the decision, not an accountant.

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