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Steel sleepered track?


steve1

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Hello Steve,

these aren´t in use in germany.

The old sleepers are made of wood and the modern one of concrete.

Kind regards

Soeren

 

Thanks, Soeren. That's just what I wanted to know!

 

Cheers

 

steve

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Hmm, not very common, and I would have said that I've only noticed it on the Narrow Guage, but turns out that I havn't been paying attention, and here is evidence to the contrary, including at least 2 examples of steel S&C as well.

 

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Jon

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As Jon's photos show it was used at one time.

I have certainly seen it on both standard and narrow gauge around Malchin way up in the north east.

The lines were closed yonks ago, but the track in places survived into the reunification period.

Bernard

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I suspect that Steel is only really used in locations where there is a low axle loading/limited freight/low speed, I don't think you would get steel sleepers on a busy bit of line - almost all of these are taken at 'backwaters'.

 

Jon

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http://www.bing.com/...1MTEyMzMzMjg3NQ==

Zoom in on the A Basedow and you will find a branch line going diagonally top r to bottom l.

This line was lifted around four years ago but had been closed long before.

About midway between Basedow and Liepen there were a number of narrow gauge lines and an interchange with the branch used for extracting gravel. Mainly used in the war from what I can gather. The loading hoppers are still there and this track had steel sleepers a few of which were still present when I was last there a couple of years ago.

Very much a backwater.

Bernard

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Well there are many lines in Germany which have steel sleepers.

 

Why are they there?

Sometimes you need sleepers which aren't as high as concrete sleepers (wood for example is not very popular nowadays, because of naturepoisons in it and so on). On bridges that were built before electrification, it was easier to lower the track than make the bridge higher. Sometimes there is a second bridge under the track, but between sleeper and the ground there has to be at least 40 cm of gravel. A concrete sleeper ist at least 28cm high, a steel sleeper about 10-15cm.

 

Besides this in germany we had Y-Track. It is named because of it's look. (second picture here http://www.rsw-stahlbau.de/pages/referenzen/baugruppe-stahlbau.php)

It gives the track a much better stability, but for maintenance you always need a turnout (what is the right translation of "Stopfmaschine" in englisch?) "Stopfmaschine" :scratchhead: .

 

The other problem with steel sleepers ist the rail feedback. Many tracks in germany have an electric circuit to measure whether there is a train on it or not. The axle of the car will short the circuit, so the guy in the signal box gets a feedback. But the steel sleeper will also short the circuit.

 

I hope i could help you with my "englisch" :)

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Besides this in germany we had Y-Track. It is named because of it's look. (second picture here http://www.rsw-stahl...pe-stahlbau.php)

It gives the track a much better stability, but for maintenance you always need a turnout (what is the right translation of "Stopfmaschine" in englisch?) "Stopfmaschine" :scratchhead: .

 

I think Stopfmaschine = Tamper

http://www.viessmann-modell.com/kibri/index.php?show=shop&search=true&cPath=32&cat=&lang=de

 

Your English is a lot better than my German . :ok:

 

Jon

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  • 2 weeks later...

In a "Bahn Extra" magazine from the '80s about the DB in the '70s, there is a picture of the derailed TEE56 "Bavaria" at Aitrang. The track is very clearly using steel sleepers. So main line use is prototypical.

 

Mike

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As far as I know steel sleepers like shown above are unwanted by DB Netz, because the ballast need to be pushed completely under the sleepers. If there is just a small space below, the sleeper will start to move up and down, which makes that the sleeper needs to be changed after discovery ("Gleislagefehler"). Special Tampers need to be used, or the good old manpower.

 

Steel sleepers have originally been introduced by the sleeper industry to create a new market for their steel fabrication, disregarding the needs of an infrastructure company like DB Netz. The Y-Sleepers are nothing else than bent I-beam with conventional clamps on top. But they all need special tampers which are unwanted by DB Netz (Though I think they have at least one. Points tamper are possibly also suited to tamp steel sleepered track). If all our concrete sleepers had been manufactured properly, there never would have been any reason not to use them.

 

Steel Sleeper seen from the underside: http://de.wikipedia....ahlschwelle.jpg

Some other nice pictures here: http://de.wikipedia....ki/Bahnschwelle

 

In a "Bahn Extra" magazine from the '80s about the DB in the '70s, there is a picture of the derailed TEE56 "Bavaria" at Aitrang. The track is very clearly using steel sleepers. So main line use is prototypical.

 

This clearly may be the truth then, but those sections of track probably are replaced by now if it's not a Y-sleepered one.

 

 

 

OFF TOPIC

 

Thanks for the translation!

 

I think I have to make a database for the translations, google in this case is not very helpful.

 

But I think here are as much helpers as i need to get this together ;)

 

Benutz doch Anki: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anki

Ich habe Anki die ganze Zeit geöffnet. Wenn eine Vokabel vorkommt, die ich nachschauen muss (z.B. bei dict.cc), dann schreibe ich sie mir gleich heraus. Auch wenn ich nicht täglich zum Lernen komme, behalte ich doch eine Menge.

 

@all: Just giving him tips how I improve my English out of the written English language.

 

Felix

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Hello again :)

 

ist schon krude wenn man in einem englischen Forum deutsch "schreibt" :D

 

Anki kannte ich nich nicht, google translate ist nicht immer eine große Hilfe ... Ich hab grad mehr Stress mit Mathe ...

 

Back to topic!

 

Concrete sleepers are not always suitable, but cheap!

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  • 4 months later...
  • 4 weeks later...

Heres a view of the eastern approach to Immenstadt/Allgau station in southern Germany. The right-hand track is the mainline from Kempten -Concrete Sleeper; the centre track is mainline to Kempten - Steel sleepers; and the left-hand track is the branch to Oberstdorf - wooden sleepers. Problem solved?

 

 

 

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