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bathroom floor tiles


dave_long

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Hi folks

Thought I'd tap into the experience on here.

I want to put ceramic floor tiles, perhaps mosaic tiles on the floor of our under the stairs bathroom. It seems as though tiling around a toilet is generally frowned upon. However I'm a little short on time (new baby due in December) and don't really want to lift the basin and pedestal and toilet seat to tile under them, this would mean adding extenders to the sink water pipes, removing all the small tiles above the basin which would ruin the plaster board behind it also. The toilet upright would need raising again ruining the plasterboard its attached to.

 

Can I get away with tiling around the seat and basin pedestal? Has anyone done this? We don't plan on replacing the toilet anytime soon as its only a few years old (new house) so worrying about matching a new seat to the tiles isn't a problem. Its not our main bathroom so I can live with it.

Would you recommend it or not?

 

Thanks for your time

Dave

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Dave,

 

Is there any point to putting ceramic tiles there - cold to the feet and slippery if any liquid is spilt. I would suggest that a a piece of carpet cut round would be less slippery and dangerous, and warmer for the winter. Also easier to take up and wash should any accidents occur. Just my thoughts on the subject.

 

Dennis

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  • RMweb Gold

I have done both. I have two bathrooms and the first one was the one where I tiled around the bog and sink. It's a load more work to tile round than to raise them up over a fully tiled floor. Also - keep enough spare tiles in case you need to change the sanitaryware in future because there will be hole in the floor!! I feel I did a reasonable job both ways. I wasted a couple of tiles because they are hard shapes to cut out. So to summarise - it's possible to tile round, but it's harder than you think and probably harder than the alternative.

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Tiling round is definitely frowned upon and is a good mark of a DIY job.

 

Like all surfaces that get wet bathrooms and kitchens the tiling should go under all units, sanitary ware.

 

It sounds as if it was installed incorrectly in the first place.

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Guest stuartp

I haven't done it with tiles but I have fitted parquet floor round a toilet and sink. I left about 1/8 inch gap between the floor and the porcelein which I filled with white silicone, partly to stop condensation running into the end grain and partly because I knew I could lay a bead of sealant neater than I could saw wood, even sawing carefully and using lots of paper templates.The plumber told me off but only because if he'd known he would have fitted them on 6mm packing pieces in the first place. It looked fine.

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  • RMweb Gold

Dave,

 

Is there any point to putting ceramic tiles there - cold to the feet and slippery if any liquid is spilt. I would suggest that a a piece of carpet cut round would be less slippery and dangerous, and warmer for the winter. Also easier to take up and wash should any accidents occur. Just my thoughts on the subject.

 

Dennis

 

Hi Dave and Dennis,

 

There's every point in tiling a bathroom floor. It's more hygenic and attractive than carpet, which WILL end up with horrible damp marks on it once water has been spilt on it (which it will because it's in a bathroom). In a centrally heated house it's never that cold underfoot to be uncomfortable. I have had both in my time and would NEVER have a carpet in a bathroom again

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  • RMweb Gold

Tiling round is definitely frowned upon and is a good mark of a DIY job.

 

Like all surfaces that get wet bathrooms and kitchens the tiling should go under all units, sanitary ware.

 

It sounds as if it was installed incorrectly in the first place.

 

In a new house probably installed on the assumption of vinyl flooring - no gap required

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Hi Dave,

I'm afraid that tiling under is the only real option, for three reasons/

1/ ease of cutting and fitting the tiles

2/ it looks better

3/ it is definitely more hygenic!

 

With respect to the pipework, assuming the tiles are not excessively thick:-

the pan connector should have enough 'give' to take up the difference.

The 3 supply pipes would be easy to cut and use flexible tap connector

pipes [braided stainless].

The only unknown [for me] is whether or not there is an o/flow pipe [and

which way it runs]

 

Go on, bite the bullet and do it properly, Jeff

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  • RMweb Gold

Years back in our previous house I was commanded to remove the existing bathroom carpet (there when we bought the house) and replace it with cork tiles; sure enough the carpet was quite yucky underneath. I then laid hardboard and tiled on top of it to get a smooth floor and went around the washbasin and w.c, pedestals, the tiles were then sealed. About a dozen years later we extended and the bathroom ceased to be a bathroom so the floor covering came up - and of course despite sealant and a tight fit some 'moisture' had clearly got under the hardboard, not much but still it had got there.

 

Simple conclusion - unless you tile underneath with ceramic tiles you are invariably going to get some 'seepage' - however good your or your son's aim might be! And of course washing the floor will be much simpler and useful as well.

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  • RMweb Gold

I would just say that I think people are exaggerating the benefit of "tiling under" in terms of liquid penetrating beneath the tiles. As neither the toilet nor the pedestal move that much you can get a perfectly good seal between them and the tiles which will be just as watertight as the grout lines between any two tiles. It's not the same as trying to seal against a bath edge or shower tray which move quite a bit in use.

 

You mentioned mosaics, but I think you would find it hard to get as good a fit around things using mosaics without cutting, than you would with big tiles trimmed. Draw a circle on a piece of graph paper and draw the nearest line you can around the circle following whole squares on the graph paper - you will see some very big gaps.Trimming mosaics is blue language difficult so make sure you are home alone if you try it!!!!

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  • RMweb Gold

We had carpet in the bathroom which we replaced with tiles as a combination of small children splashing in the bath and carpet led to some odd smells and a permadamp floor

 

We had someone in who, as the bathroom had not been tiled before had to board out the floor with ply (or whatever) for the tiles to stick to, he then tiled the floor and put the sink and and toilet on top if the tiles which obviously has made them sit higher however we have flexqble pipes to the sink so we didnt have to worry about extending them, the fitter said he would never tile round toilets and sinks as it it a "DIY" thing to do, also another good reason being should you have a problem with the sink or toilet in the future and you have to replace them having cut round the existing loo you will end up with gaps or having to cut more tile away unless you got exactly the same suite as a replacement

 

Regarding tiles, especially with kids on the way, watch what you get, we got some lovely white porcelin bathroom tiles but once wet they are leathal, dont seem to have much grip on them, our youngest has slipped over on them a couple of times, a few people have actually recommended using kitchen or even outdoor tiles in a bathroom as they are more grippy

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Colin

Thanks, i think that if I do lift the basin and loo which I think I will now then I will go for a more standard tile.

Jim,

Thanks, we have a toddler and a second on the way, so I'll make sure when I go to buy them what kind of surface they have.

 

I've been looking at the flexible braided hoses, can I just cut the current pipes anywhere along their length and then attach them in line without any other items, or do I have to go to a existing joint in the pipe?

 

Our toilet is a close fit toilet, and the the cistern is attached to a plasterboard wall panel, which blocks in the base on the stairs. The floor is concrete and seems to be level (must have got lucky) The only bits I'll have to tile around are the sinks pipes at the floor level and the toilet waste which is set in the concrete floor.

 

regards

Dave

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I've been looking at the flexible braided hoses, can I just cut the current pipes anywhere along their length and then attach them in line without any other items, or do I have to go to a existing joint in the pipe?

 

Our toilet is a close fit toilet, and the the cistern is attached to a plasterboard wall panel, which blocks in the base on the stairs. The floor is concrete and seems to be level (must have got lucky) The only bits I'll have to tile around are the sinks pipes at the floor level and the toilet waste which is set in the concrete floor.

 

regards

Dave

 

The flexible hoses come either as pipe-to-pipe or pipe-to-tap, [also push-fit or compression]

It all depends on the type and location of the existing pipes, but I would recommend using

pipe-to-tap if poss. [same on w/c]

 

The cistern does not need to be attached to the wall behind it, best option is a couple of small

blobs of silicone [new cisterns don't even have holes for screws] This is to eliminate the seal

between pan and cistern being strained/damaged.

 

Jeff

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Jeff

Thanks, I think the braided pipe to tap will fit just fine, the pipes actually go in to the wall not the floor only the waste goes to the floor.

 

That's interesting to hear about the cistern, there are 2 screws through the back of the cistern currently but they aren't that that big and they are screwed into a standard plasterboard wall. Certainly being able to attach it with silicone would benefit me as the uplifting of the seat would mean the existing holes may be so close to the new holes and crumble the plasterboard too much.

 

What about an extending ring/flange for the toilet waste? Is it needed and what is it dependent on?

 

I very much appreciate all the help guys

 

Dave

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  • RMweb Gold

When we moved in to this house 20 years ago it was new and the lavatories were screwed to the chipboard floors. Not knowing any better we had carpet laid. When I replaced the flooring (I had to replace the floor as well in the ensuite due the bodged method the builders had used with the shower installation) the new lavatory was about an inch higher than the old one. I went and bought a flexible concertina fitting for the pan to soil pipe connection. At this point the soil pipe connections separated outside the wall. It transpired when built the builders had used a combination of pushfit and solvent fittings but it appeared that there was only solvent on the push fittings the others were loose. Mad rush off to Wickes for replacement parts on a Friday evening ensued!

 

Tony

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Dave,

It all dependson which pan/conn is fitted, I have to assume that it

is a vertical plastic 4" [100mm] pipe coming up through the floor.

If that is correct, then there should be more than enough of the

pan/conn in that pipe to lift it up to align with the pan without any

worries of leakage. You might have to remove it and clean the

rubber fins to ensure a good seal for peace of mind. Most pan/

conns [esp. the 90* ones] are too long and are designed to be

cut to length, which is unlikely in your case as it sounds like a

new[ish] build and they very rarely do it properly [to keep costs

to a minimum]

Jeff

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