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7mm road surfaces


cromptonnut

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Been working on a bridge today for the end of my layout. Made out of 5mm foamcore board, it will be covered with Slaters 0400 7mm English Bond brick red plasticard which will of course be painted and weathered in the usual manner.

 

But I'm at a bit of a loss for what to do for the road surface. I gave the foamboard a spray of gray primer and tried painting it with "dirty black" matt paint but it looks too flat and perfect. I've done it fine in 2mm layouts in the past, you can more or less get away with it in 4mm but it just looks wrong in 7mm.

 

I'm thinking of spreading a layer of glue thinly on the "road surface", laying fine sand on it, with a spray of diluted PVA and touching up, then painted/weathered but I'm wondering if that might look a bit too "newly surfaced road".

 

It's a rural road, early 1980's somewhere in the west country (so a strip of grass down the middle wouldn't look out of place). Somewhere between this and this I think.

 

How do you achieve a 'used' textured road surface without it looking like it was resurfaced a week ago?

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Try putting down some fine grade sandpaper, some are already a black colour or you can paint it using acrylics to the colour your happy with. Also there is a supplier out there (I have forgot his name at present), who does manhole and drain covers to bring things to life.

 

Martyn.

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Do you mean "wet and dry" or something coarser? I've got some yellow stuff (which obviously I can repaint) with "P60" on the back although it's not quite wide enough for the road I've made - perhaps some A4 sheets can be trimmed.

 

I just can't quite visualise what the 'right' sandpaper would be to use.

 

Do you mean http://www.sanddmodels.co.uk/products_43_figures.htm item OF207 for the manhole covers and drains?

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Very simple. Take SWMBO to Tenerife for a holiday. Buy a bottle of Sangria and a packet of Pringles. Eat the Pringles and wash them down with the sangria, you might even need a second bottle/jug. Then next morning take the empty pringles tube to the beach and fill it with black sand. Label it carefully for security. When you get home put PVA on your road surface and sprinkle the black sand onto the PVA. Allow to dry, brush off and then if necessary paint the result.

 

I used the above method for tarmac platform surfaces on Long Preston and the road surfaces on the overbridges. It works a treat but I haven't got any photos that I can publish.

 

Jamie

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Mine isn't as simple as the other methods suggested, but I cover the foamboard with very thin modelling clay (rolled so that it is completely flat), sprinkle on fine ballast (also rolled flat) and then paint and weather it.

 

As shown here - http://www.rmweb.co....o-gauge-layout/ - post 13.

 

But I do like Jamie's method, although a little expensive!

 

Stephen

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Following some of the suggestions above, I got as far as eating a tub of Pringles but decided that a weekend in Tenerife used up too many Modelling Tokens. Don't have any modelling clay to hand and 7am is a bit early to find somewhere that might sell some, and it's an hour away on the bus anyway.

 

However, I did find tucked away in the box some Javis N gauge ballast (JXG7BR) which is very fine and I believe made from crushed fruit stones. It's brown but that shouldn't be a problem.

 

Using a spare corner offcut of foamboard, I've done a couple of test patches, one using it sprinkled on to PVA and the other sprinkled on to "Realistic Water" resin as I didn't know whether spreading PVA too thin would make it work or not. That's now drying for a few hours, then I'll try later with applying a layer of diluted PVA or clear varnish to seal it, then overpainting it with my "dirty black" tub of paint and see which out of the four options looks the best.

 

I shall report back later with my results and hopefully an image or two.

 

I will also be doing a little bit of foliage along the edges, as is often the way in rural roads.

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Been working on a bridge today for the end of my layout. Made out of 5mm foamcore board, it will be covered with Slaters 0400 7mm English Bond brick red plasticard which will of course be painted and weathered in the usual manner.

 

But I'm at a bit of a loss for what to do for the road surface. .......

......How do you achieve a 'used' textured road surface without it looking like it was resurfaced a week ago?

 

Whatever you do for the surface don't forget that if it's a metalled road it must have a camber to look convincing. The two road bridges on Dock Green have foamboard shells like yours. I put in a sub-base on which I glued curved ribs. Black mounting card (which actually looks dark grey to me) was shaped to the curve and stuck to the ribs. In due course I plan to add repairs, patches etc. I saw a ScaleSeven layout at a show with some very good modelling, but the road bridge that crossed the yard had a flat surface and therefore looked nothing like a road.

 

Chaz

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"It's this sort of effect I'm looking for - and you can't really see any form of camber."

 

Hmmm. Had a look at bridge photo in your link - and I have to say I think you're wrong - I can see the camber. It's up to you (of course - Rule One applies) but if you don't put a camber in it will always look wrong. The effect is subtle, but the light and shade on the curved surface is definitely there and will be very obvious if it isn't on your model.

 

Just trying to be helpful....

 

Chaz

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Fair enough if you can see it ... maybe it's just my tired old eyes that don't see it :)

 

I wonder whether 'extra layers' of the fine ballast sprinkled across more to the centre of the road would give a reasonable effect - I can't find any specific dimensions for road camber but assume we're only talking an inch or two on a minor road like that, which scales out at less than a millimetre?

 

I know "rule 1" applies but I'd still like to try and be accurate as much as possible; although I am not a 'rivet counter' shortcuts for the sake of taking shortcuts seem a waste of time to me for something that could easily be fixed to improve appearance - so I will see if I have any suitable card or similar that I can stick along the middle of the road and build up something that way.

 

Watch this space...

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In the Hobbycraft store (and elsewhere) there is a Plasticote 'stone' paint aerosol in grey which is very good, and will give a surprisingly good starting point for a road surface, As it has other colours in it, and it is also a textured paint. This, with a little (very dry) dry brushing on top, and some loose ash or similar texture in the gutters and centre will give surprising results.

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At various times I've used the textured type of watercolour paper for roads, sometimes you can even find it in something near the right colour - if you have a good artists materials shop nearby.

 

David

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Following some of the suggestions above, I got as far as eating a tub of Pringles but decided that a weekend in Tenerife used up too many Modelling Tokens. Don't have any modelling clay to hand and 7am is a bit early to find somewhere that might sell some, and it's an hour away on the bus anyway.

 

 

My second batch of black sand came from even further away, El Salvador and I had the problem of getting it through American security packed in two gatorade bottles. They were bothe opened in transit even though I'd stuck labels on them say "Inert black volcanic sand for model railroad purposes.". Still they got home safely and they are now waiting to go on the station appoach for Lancaster Green Ayre.

 

Jamie

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Fair enough if you can see it ... maybe it's just my tired old eyes that don't see it :)

 

I wonder whether 'extra layers' of the fine ballast sprinkled across more to the centre of the road would give a reasonable effect - I can't find any specific dimensions for road camber but assume we're only talking an inch or two on a minor road like that, which scales out at less than a millimetre?

 

I know "rule 1" applies but I'd still like to try and be accurate as much as possible; although I am not a 'rivet counter' shortcuts for the sake of taking shortcuts seem a waste of time to me for something that could easily be fixed to improve appearance - so I will see if I have any suitable card or similar that I can stick along the middle of the road and build up something that way.

 

Watch this space...

 

Why not try the effect by curving a piece of dark grey card? You could cut the card so that it will just drop into the bridge. Form the camber by hand and just pop it in to see how well it looks. You can play around with the amount of camber and when you are happy a few strips of packing of varying thicknesses can be used to fix the curve.

 

I think it might be very difficult to get a convincing look with 'extra layers'.

 

Chaz

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For a "country lane" look, I have previously used textured paint. This is then painted as required and weathered with powders and talcum powder.

 

The few roads on my Factory Lane Sidings layout use a dense type of foamboard which is grey in colour and I peeled away the paper covering to reveal the foam. The foam was then painted and weathered.

 

I also used the same for producing the cobbled road surface. The cobbles were "scribbed" using a small screwdriver blade and then painted accordingly.

 

Alan.

 

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Many of the country lanes that crossed the railways were not cambered as they were layed before the requirement of the motor car, so the bridges did not have cambers. One local bridge to me has a notice that say's adverse camber as there isn't one and that was built in the 1890's so athough some may think it does not look right it can be, and unless the camber is made over scale I do not think they show up very well.

 

regards

 

mike g

 

PS worked for the largest UK contractor that built roads and the camber can vary from 75mm to 150mm depending on the width, curve and type of road. The largest I was ever involved with was 80mm on a 70mph dual carigway in essex.

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For those that were following, this is the current stage.

 

road.jpg

 

I know I still need to do the bridge sides - that will be done once the road surface has been completed, and there will be a little foliage along the edge to mask the joins.

 

The surface as discussed previously was painted over with Precision "Dirty Black (Matt)" then a good spray of the stone texture paint from Plastikote. There are a couple of potholes - deliberate - which will get a small splash of resin water to create puddles in due course.

 

I'm just wondering at the moment whether it looks a bit too dark, or whether it's just my poor photography making it look darker than it is - although to be fair, to the naked eye it also looks a bit dark. Would a wash of a light grey over it (or even a light blast of grey primer?) help I wonder?

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I would tend towards lightening it up a bit. Real road surfaces are always much paler than you think. Well, than I think anyway.

 

Where did the CA Bedford come from? It loks like a nice model. Taunton registration too. My old stamping ground way back when.

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I would tend towards lightening it up a bit. Real road surfaces are always much paler than you think.

They are also much smoother - there is almost no visible texture to a road surface. They get compressed and levelled by large, heavy rollers and polished by the passage of countless vehicle wheels. IMHO too many modelled roads have surfaces which are too dark and too rough.

Dave

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It's actually an Oxford Diecast milk float, which suits the rail-served dairy which is the focal point of the layout. Handy if it is Taunton registered as my layout is based about 30 miles south of Taunton.

 

I think the photography and the angle make the road look a bit worse than it is, although I accept the colour needs a little work.

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It's actually an Oxford Diecast milk float, which suits the rail-served dairy which is the focal point of the layout. Handy if it is Taunton registered as my layout is based about 30 miles south of Taunton.

 

I think the photography and the angle make the road look a bit worse than it is, although I accept the colour needs a little work.

 

When I was growing up on the north Somerset coast, our daily milk delivery was by just such a Bedford CA milk float :) .

 

Y, YA, YB, YC and YD were all Somerset (ie Taunton) registration letters. If I may be permitted to put my pedant's hat on, though, I'm not sure about the "B" year suffix. Year letters were not adopted countrywide until January 1st 1965 with the "C" plate, with many counties still using the 123 ABC format until that date whilst others went to ABC 123A and DEF 456B for 1963 and 1964 respectively. Based on my now rather old memories of 60s vehicles in Somerset during the 1970s and early 80s, I think that county may have been one of the hold-outs. Could be wrong, though and it's a very minor point really. I'm just a bit of an anorak about workaday 1960s vehicles. :blush:

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The number plate is how the vehicle arrived so I don't know if it is 100% accurate or not... It was only a few quid because the plastic display box had a big crack in it - which, of course, makes no difference for me as it's going to be used on the layout :)

 

Making a new numberplate would of course be a very simple task, so if you do happen to find any research that proves it's inaccurate, I'd be interested to hear about it.

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