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Help with this Army Regiment


lakeview770

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Artillery cap badge, bu that does not mean that your Grandfather was an artilleryman, as in concentration areas he could be mixing with many different units

 

Probably a Staghound Armoured Car: Judging by the size and shape, plus the size of the gun barrel, probably the 37mm armed version.

 

The Staghound was an American build for British and commonwealth forces and I've always thought it bore more than just a striking resemblance to the German Sdkfz 222 Armoured scout car.

 

Regards

 

Richard

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I would agree it is likely a Staghound MkI. It is the wrong shape to be a Daimler, and the small cannon with what appears to be a muzzle brake is likely the 37mm* - it looks too small to be a 2pdr/40mm (Daimler) or any of the other Staghound options.

 

*the muzzle brake appears to have been very rare on 37mm guns, presumably more trouble than it was worth

 

Adrian

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Artillery cap badge, bu that does not mean that your Grandfather was an artilleryman, as in concentration areas he could be mixing with many different units

 

Probably a Staghound Armoured Car: Judging by the size and shape, plus the size of the gun barrel, probably the 37mm armed version.

 

The Staghound was an American build for British and commonwealth forces and I've always thought it bore more than just a striking resemblance to the German Sdkfz 222 Armoured scout car.

 

Regards

 

Richard

 

Futher to Richard's posting.

 

The Royal Artillery did use Staghound Armoured Cars. They tended to be used by the more senior officers as they moved around the front line areas. They were big and roomy compared to most British armoured cars allowing officers to set up map boards etc. and could carry extra radios so they could communicate with the subordinate artillery units and the command post of the brigade or division they were attached to when away from the artillery HQ. The staghound was normally crewed by Royal Signals attached to the RA, as we cannot see the cap badges of the guys with Andrew's grandfather we could be viewing a mix of chaps from an artillery unit HQ.

 

http://www.ww2talk.c...-artillery.html

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I think the first picture was taken either pre-war or early on in the war based on the style of the uniform (comparing it to the ones I have of my father from the war). The second picture is interesting in that he could of been in the 23rd Armoured Bridgade or in a unit attached to it. The cap bag is Royal Artillary..

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/timeline/factfiles/nonflash/a1125136.shtml

Regards.......R

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Bombardier is the Royal Artillery term for the rank of Corporal - so your grandfather was in an artillery regiment (though not necessarily a gunner - he may have been a driver or any other number of jobs!)

 

When I was in Belize with 3 Field Battery one of our Bombardier's was asked by a visiting semi-retired Brigadier from the MOD, "Corporal, when was the last time you done bayonet practice?" With that the bombardier looked at the 105mm light gun behind him and replied "It quite difficult with 2 ton of gun, sir". With that then Battery Commander wisked the Brigadier off to view our then new and modern computer system. The Troop Commander was about to tell the Bombardier off, when the bombardier said "Did you hear that sir, he called me corporal. Corporal of all things." The TC replied "Well you know these infantry officers don't realise that bombardier is the correct rank and the artillery allows the rest of the army to call their two stripers corporal."

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Royal Artilliery - "Ubique" - which doesn't say much for their gunnery ! :no:

Ah, good old dropshorts!

 

Always a good one sending the sprog off for the bayonet for the light gun :) was wondering about that this weekend... officer's sword and some gaffer tape?

 

Up the Royals (Marines that is) !!

So you're into your naked rollmat fighting then? ;)

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It's a Coventry Mk. 1, virtually a British version of the Staghound. It was introduced in 1944 to replace both the Daimler and Humber armoured cars.

 

Hi Phil

 

It is a Staghound, check the rear, the Staghound has a pronounced engine compartment. http://www.flickriver.com/photos/sarge_schultz/5307858363/ and the Coventry did not http://www.warwheels.net/images/Coventry1paget1.JPG The Staghound had a cast turret, and the Coventry's was made up from flat plates. You can also see the two front hatches open, the driver's and the bow machine gunner/radio operator's http://www.warwheels.net/Staghound1Index.htmlThe Coventry only had a drivers hatch. http://mailer.fsu.edu/~akirk/tanks/GreatBritain/GB-CoventryMk1AC.jpg

 

The Coventry prototypes were ready in 1944, not many had be built by the end of the war. None saw action with the British Army. They were used in French Indochina by the French Army post war.

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The simple way forward might be to apply for his service record. Not sure where it would be, possibly Public Record Office. It's something geneologists do. I have an ancestor's papers from they early 19th Century - they did come from the PRO.

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The simple way forward might be to apply for his service record. Not sure where it would be, possibly Public Record Office. It's something geneologists do. I have an ancestor's papers from they early 19th Century - they did come from the PRO.

Try http://www.forces-war-records.co.uk

Clive, the armoured car turret does appear to be made from flat plates, however some Staghounds did have such turrets.

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