Jump to content
 

Train Ferry Traffic - photos from the NRM


Recommended Posts

This set of photos are currently on the NRM website, and have been available through the Science and Society website, but as the search function is rubish, and the indexing has also apparently been done by someone who knows precious little about trains, I thought I'd build a gallery here to make things a bit easier to find.

Jon

A lorry loaded with fruit, 1954

Description: Boxes of fruit being unloaded from a railway van at Bishopsgate, London, 28 April 1954. The fruit had been transported all the way from Italy in refrigerated vans to keep it fresh on its journey. It was taken to its final destination, probably a local market, by road.


1995-7233_LIVST_FT_229.jpg


The photo above is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) licence. In a nutshell, that means it's free for any non-commercial use as long as you credit "© National Railway Museum and SSPL" http://www.nrm.org.u...erpoolst&item=5

Link to post
Share on other sites

Bridge of the MV Cambridge Ferry 1968

 

Description: Officers on the bridge of the MV Cambridge Ferry, 20 February 1968. This vessel was one of four British Railways freight ferries used on the route between Harwich and Zeebrugge. She made her maiden voyage in 1964.

 

1995-7233_LIVST_MF_290.jpg

http://www.nrm.org.u...rpoolst&item=49

 

The photo above is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) licence. In a nutshell, that means it's free for any non-commercial use as long as you credit "© National Railway Museum and SSPL

Link to post
Share on other sites

Cars on the Norfolk Ferry, 1951

 

 

Description: Left-hand drive Austin cars, loaded onto the hold of the MV Norfolk Ferry for export to Europe, 17 July 1951. This ferry was built by John Brown & Co, at Clydebank. It was used on the Harwich to Zeebrugge service, mainly for the transportation of vehicles, and railway rolling stock. The ferry also carried a small number of passengers.

 

 

1995-7233_LIVST_MF_95.jpg

 

http://www.nrm.org.u...rpoolst&item=78

The photo above is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) licence. In a nutshell, that means it's free for any non-commercial use as long as you credit "© National Railway Museum and SSPL" and add a link back to this page.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Cars on the Suffolk Ferry, 1972

 

Description: Cars destined for export loaded into the hold of the MV Suffolk Ferry, January 1972. This freight ferry, built by John Brown and Co at Clydebank in 1947, was the first diesel-powered London & North Eastern Railway ship. Railway goods vans could run on rails directly into the hold of the ship.

 

 

Jons comment - nearest camera is a Belgian side&end door van, followed by in interesting refrigerated wagon with a sun sheild roof - perhaps one of Transfesa's?

 

1995-7233_LIVST_MF_343.jpg

 

http://www.nrm.org.u...rpoolst&item=79The photo above is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) licence. In a nutshell, that means it's free for any non-commercial use as long as you credit "© National Railway Museum and SSPL" and add a link back to this page.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Container on the Norfolk Ferry, 1971

 

Description: Securing a railway van on the deck of the Norfolk Ferry at Harwich, Essex, 17 July 1951. The ship was about to start its maiden voyage. Railway rolling stock could run on rails directly into the hold of the ship. The Norfolk Ferry was built by John Brown & Co, at Clydebank. It was used on the Harwich to Zeebrugge service.

 

 

[sarcasm]the specialist teminology for a railway container with wheels attached is a 'wagon'.[\Sarcasm]

 

More sensibly I think this disproves the belief held by most British enthusiasts is that the 'ferry hooks' on the solebars of continental wagons is to tie them to the deck during crossings, in almost all the photos I've seen the chain is passed over the buffers in the fashion shown here. The fittings are standard UIC wgon fittings there to provide somewhere to hook a rope onto for shunting by horse or capstan (to my astonishment the NRM HAVE learnt what a capstan is - no more bollards to them! ) in Britain we used holes in the W irons and frequently damaged them - not the best idea.

 

Another Italian refrigerated wagon - these appear very frequently in the BR press photo's.

 

 

 

1995-7233_LIVST_MF_94.jpg

 

http://www.nrm.org.u...poolst&item=118

The photo above is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) licence. In a nutshell, that means it's free for any non-commercial use as long as you credit "© National Railway Museum and SSPL" and add a link back to this page.

 

Container on the Norfolk Ferry, 1971

 

Description: Loading railway vans onto the Norfolk Ferry at Harwich, Essex, 17 July 1951. The ship was about to start its maiden voyage. Railway rolling stock could run on rails directly into the hold of the ship. The Norfolk Ferry was built by John Brown & Co, at Clydebank. It was used on the Harwich to Zeebrugge service.

 

 

1995-7233_LIVST_MF_90.jpg

 

http://www.nrm.org.u...poolst&item=119

The photo above is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) licence. In a nutshell, that means it's free for any non-commercial use as long as you credit "© National Railway Museum and SSPL" and add a link back to this page.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Freight for the Cambridge Ferry, 1966

 

Description: Excavators on railway wagons hauled by a diesel locomotive at Harwich, 1 November 1966. These vehicles are about to be loaded onto the Cambridge Ferry and shipped abroad. Railway rolling stock could run on rails directly into the hold of the ship. This British Railways ferry, which was built in 1963, was used on the route between Harwich and Zeebrugge.

 

1995-7233_LIVST_MF_278.jpg

 

http://www.nrm.org.u...poolst&item=266

 

The photo above is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) licence. In a nutshell, that means it's free for any non-commercial use as long as you credit "© National Railway Museum and SSPL" and add a link back to this page.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Launch of the Essex Ferry, 1955

 

Description: The launch of the Essex Ferry, 24 October 1955. This ferry, built at Clydebank by John Brown and Co, was used to carry railway freight trains across the North Sea, between Harwich and Zeebrugge. It could carry 38 wagons on four tracks on the decks, and also had accommodation for 12 first class passengers.

 

 

1995-7233_LIVST_MF_117.jpg

 

http://www.nrm.org.u...poolst&item=421

The photo above is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) licence. In a nutshell, that means it's free for any non-commercial use as long as you credit "© National Railway Museum and SSPL" and add a link back to this page.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Loading the MV Cambridge Ferry, 1966

 

Description: An ammonia converter being loaded onto the MV Cambridge Ferry en route to Germany. 23 July 1966. This vessel was one of four British Railways freight ferries used on the route between Harwich and Zeebrugge. Rail vehicles could be shunted straight onto tracks laid on the cargo deck. She made her maiden voyage in 1964. .

 

 

 

1995-7233_LIVST_MF_259.jpg

 

http://www.nrm.org.u...poolst&item=492

The photo above is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) licence. In a nutshell, that means it's free for any non-commercial use as long as you credit "© National Railway Museum and SSPL" and add a link back to this page.

 

 

Loading the MV Cambridge Ferry, 1966

 

Description: A railway track ballast cleaner being loaded onto the MV Cambridge Ferry en route to Germany. 23 July 1966. This vessel was one of four British Railways freight ferries used on the route between Harwich and Zeebrugge. Rail vehicles could be shunted straight onto tracks laid on the cargo deck. She made her maiden voyage in 1964.

 

 

1995-7233_LIVST_MF_256.jpg

 

http://www.nrm.org.u...poolst&item=493

 

The photo above is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) licence. In a nutshell, that means it's free for any non-commercial use as long as you credit "© National Railway Museum and SSPL" and add a link back to this page.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Loading the MV Norfolk Ferry, 1971

 

 

Description: Freight vans being shunted onto the MV Norfolk Ferry at Harwich, Essex, March 1971. The British Railways Sealink Norfolk Ferry was built by John Brown & Co, at Clydebank and operated on the Harwich to Zeebrugge service. Railway rolling stock could run on rails directly into the hold of the ship.

 

Jons comment - I think this is the photo that disproves the rule - see my comment up thread about the 'ferry tie-down hooks' bnot being for that purpose - I thinkn they are being used that way in this example because if the chain was passed over the buffers it would damage the ladders at each end.

 

1995-7233_LIVST_MF_326.jpg

 

http://www.nrm.org.u...poolst&item=494

The photo above is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) licence. In a nutshell, that means it's free for any non-commercial use as long as you credit "© National Railway Museum and SSPL" and add a link back to this page.

Link to post
Share on other sites

London to Paris freightliner, 1968

 

Description: Railway managers at the inaugural run of the London to Paris freightliner train, pulled by a Class 47 diesel locomotive number D1758, 22 April 1968. This freight train connected with a ferry across the English Channel, and on arrival the rolling stock was hauled by a French locomotive to Paris. British Railways Freightliner services began in 1965 and were fast freight trains that carried a wide variety of goods and provided a more efficient door to door service. Goods were transported n containers so they could quickly transferred by overhead cranes from rail to road vehicles.

 

 

1995-7233_LIVST_FX_154A.jpg

 

http://www.nrm.org.u...poolst&item=509

 

London to Paris freightliner, 1968

 

Description: Managers and a British Rail driver at the inaugural run of the London to Paris freightliner train, pulled by a Class 47 diesel locomotive number D1758, 22 April 1968. This freight train connected with a ferry across the English Channel, and on arrival the rolling stock was hauled by a French locomotive to Paris. British Railwys Freightliner services began in 1965 and were fast freight trains that carried a wide variety of goods and provided a more efficient door to door service. Goods were transported n containers so they could quickly transferred by overhead cranes from rail to road vehicles.

 

 

1995-7233_LIVST_FX_152.jpg

http://www.nrm.org.u...poolst&item=510

 

London to Paris freightliner, 1968

 

Description: Inaugural run of the London to Paris freightliner train, pulled by a Class 47 diesel locomotive number D1758, 22 April 1968. This freight train connected with a ferry across the English Channel, and on arrival the rolling stock was hauled by a French locomotive to Paris. British Railwys Freightliner services began in 1965 and were fast freight trains that carried a wide variety of goods and provided a more efficient door to door service. Goods were transported n containers so they could quickly transferred by overhead cranes from rail to road vehicles.

 

 

1995-7233_LIVST_FX_149.jpg

http://www.nrm.org.u...poolst&item=511

 

The photo above is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) licence. In a nutshell, that means it's free for any non-commercial use as long as you credit "© National Railway Museum and SSPL" and add a link back to this page.

Link to post
Share on other sites

MV Cambridge Ferry, 1966

 

Description: Road vehicles for export being loaded by a fork lift truck onto the Cambridge Ferry, 1 November 1966. This British Railways ferry was built in 1963 and served on the route between Harwich and Zeebrugge. It could transport railway rolling stock, freight and road vehicles.

 

 

1995-7233_LIVST_MF_283A.jpg

 

 

 

 

http://www.nrm.org.u...poolst&item=515

 

 

 

MV Cambridge Ferry, 1966

 

Description: The MV Cambridge Ferry leaving Harwich, Essex, 1 November 1966. This British Railways ferry was built in 1963 and served on the route between Harwich and Zeebrugge. It could transport railway rolling stock, freight and road vehicles.

 

Jons comment - I think this is the same day as the photo of the tractors and VTG tank wagon seen in post#6 You can just see them on deck behind the lorry trailer. The tank wagon would have to travel on the open part of the deck in case of fire - not sure if this was to make it easy to spray with water, or easy to push off the stern!

 

1995-7233_LIVST_MF_275.jpg

 

http://www.nrm.org.u...poolst&item=516

 

The photo above is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) licence. In a nutshell, that means it's free for any non-commercial use as long as you credit "© National Railway Museum and SSPL" and add a link back to this page.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Norfolk Ferry, 1971

 

Description: Loading railway vans onto the Norfolk Ferry at Harwich, Essex, 17 July 1951. The ship was about to start its maiden voyage. Railway rolling stock could run on rails directly into the hold of the ship. The Norfolk Ferry was built by John Brown & Co, at Clydebank. It was used on the Harwich to Zeebrugge service.

 

Jons comments - the dates are clearly a bit muddled up, cant be both 1951 and 1971.

 

Top photo nearest camera is another Italian refrigerated van (with a sunsheild or 'colonial' roof), then a couple of Belgian general goods vans, then a string of Italians again.

 

 

1995-7233_LIVST_MF_93.jpg

 

http://www.nrm.org.u...poolst&item=561

 

Norfolk Ferry, 1971

 

 

Description: Loading railway vans onto the Norfolk Ferry at Harwich, Essex, 17 July 1951. The ship was about to start its maiden voyage. Railway rolling stock could run on rails directly into the hold of the ship. The Norfolk Ferry was built by John Brown & Co, at Clydebank. It was used on the Harwich to Zeebrugge service.

 

 

1995-7233_LIVST_MF_92.jpg

 

http://www.nrm.org.u...poolst&item=562

The photo above is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) licence. In a nutshell, that means it's free for any non-commercial use as long as you credit "© National Railway Museum and SSPL" and add a link back to this page.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The hold of the MV Norfolk Ferry, 1971

 

Description: The MV Norfolk Ferry at Harwich, Essex, March 1971. The British Railways Sealink Norfolk Ferry was built by John Brown & Co, at Clydebank and operated on the Harwich to Zeebrugge service. Railway rolling stock could run on rails directly into the hold of the ship.

 

jons comment - nearest the camera is a prototype of the good old Triang/Hornby VIX ferry van (an Hfs in UIC coding) behind that I thik is a German Hfs.

 

1995-7233_LIVST_MF_323.jpg

 

http://www.nrm.org.u...poolst&item=815

 

The photo above is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) licence. In a nutshell, that means it's free for any non-commercial use as long as you credit "© National Railway Museum and SSPL" and add a link back to this page.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Army vehicles and railway carriages being loaded onto a ferry, 1918

 

Description: Army lorries and ambulance trains loaded onto a train ferry at Southampton, 11 April 1918. The ferry accommodated both road and rail vehicles. The lorries and ambulance trains are heading for the Western Front in France or Belgium, where the German Army had just launched its spring offensive. The ambulance trains had been manufactured by the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway.

 

 

1997-7059_HOR_F_2535.jpg

 

http://www.nrm.org.u...horwich&item=27

 

Army vehicles being loaded onto a ferry, 1918

 

Description: Army lorries loaded onto a train ferry at Southampton, 11 April 1918. The ferry accommodated both road and rail vehicles. These vehicles are heading for the Western Front in France or Belgium, where the German Army had just launched its spring offensive.

 

 

1997-7059_HOR_F_2529.jpg

http://www.nrm.org.u...horwich&item=28

 

Army vehicles being loaded onto a ferry, 1918

 

Description: Army lorries loaded onto a ferry at Southampton, 11 April 1918. The ferry accommodated both road and rail vehicles. These vehicles are heading for the Western Front in France or Belgium, where the German Army had just launched its spring offensive.

 

 

1997-7059_HOR_F_2528.jpg

http://www.nrm.org.u...horwich&item=29

 

The photo above is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) licence. In a nutshell, that means it's free for any non-commercial use as long as you credit "© National Railway Museum and SSPL" and add a link back to this page.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Railway carriages being loaded onto a ferry, 1918

 

Description: An ambulance train loaded onto a ferry at Southampton, 11 April 1918. The ferry accommodated both road and rail vehicles. The train is probably heading for the Western Front in France or Belgium, where the German Army had just launched its spring offensive. The ambulance trains had been manufactured by the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway.

 

 

 

1997-7059_HOR_F_2533.jpg

 

http://www.nrm.org.u...orwich&item=492

 

The photo above is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) licence. In a nutshell, that means it's free for any non-commercial use as long as you credit "© National Railway Museum and SSPL" and add a link back to this page.

Link to post
Share on other sites

1995-7233_LIVST_MF_343.jpg

 

http://www.nrm.org.uk/ourcollection/photo?group=liverpoolst&item=79The photo above is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) licence. In a nutshell, that means it's free for any non-commercial use as long as you credit "© National Railway Museum and SSPL" and add a link back to this page.

 

Last time I saw that many Austin 1100's they were piled on top of each other in a scrap yard.....

Link to post
Share on other sites

why where the BR arrows backwards on some (all) train ferrys?

 

Only 'backwards' on the port side of the funnel only, this was to ensure that the double arrow faced 'forward' on both sides of the ship. Naturally on rolling stock the double arrow is the same on either side of the loco/carriage/wagon, this is partly because such stock is designed to travel in both directions, however ships are not, hence on the port side the arrow of indecision was changed so that it faced 'forwards'.

All the BR operated steamers which carried the double arrow on the funnel sported this arrangement, save for one or two cock ups.

If you look at todays P&O ferries, whilst they have the P&O flag on each side of the funnel as a logo, it's not symmetrical as the 'hoist' (part of the flag nearest the flagpole) always faces towards the bow.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Only 'backwards' on the port side of the funnel only, this was to ensure that the double arrow faced 'forward' on both sides of the ship. Naturally on rolling stock the double arrow is the same on either side of the loco/carriage/wagon, this is partly because such stock is designed to travel in both directions, however ships are not, hence on the port side the arrow of indecision was changed so that it faced 'forwards'.

All the BR operated steamers which carried the double arrow on the funnel sported this arrangement, save for one or two cock ups.

If you look at todays P&O ferries, whilst they have the P&O flag on each side of the funnel as a logo, it's not symmetrical as the 'hoist' (part of the flag nearest the flagpole) always faces towards the bow.

 

thanks, it was somthing ive always wanted to know but never have!! cheers

Link to post
Share on other sites

There's an interesting page on the train ferries which operated from Harwich here: http://www.harwichan...-ferry-service/

 

As a point of interest, there is still one former train ferry plying the channel, the 'Nord pas de Calais' - as the name suggests she's French and formerly was part of the SNCF fleet. She only carries vehicle freight these days, but has the distinction of being the last Channel train ferry, working in that manner until 1994 when she was superseded by the Channel Tunnel. There's a wiki entry here: http://en.wikipedia....d_Pas-de-Calais

Link to post
Share on other sites

Woof! Some pleasant shots here!

 

1997-7059_HOR_F_2533.jpg

 

http://www.nrm.org.u...orwich&item=492

 

The photo above is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) licence. In a nutshell, that means it's free for any non-commercial use as long as you credit "© National Railway Museum and SSPL" and add a link back to this page.

 

I wonder if this is the Richborough port WWI train ferry?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of these captions aren't great (see the 'Magazine Captions' topic for discussion of what this could mean for what is a national collection). For example, see this one - http://www.nrm.org.u...poolst&item=421 - did John Brown's really have a yard in Essex?

 

The caption is incorrect, that photo was most definitely taken at the John Brown yard in Clydebank. As far as I'm aware, all Brown's shipbuilding/engineering interests were in the West of Scotland.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The caption is incorrect, that photo was most definitely taken at the John Brown yard in Clydebank. As far as I'm aware, all Brown's shipbuilding/engineering interests were in the West of Scotland.

 

I know, Jim, - I grew up on the Clyde. I should have put a smiley on my comment!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.


×
×
  • Create New...