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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/07/22 in Blog Comments

  1. Interesting, I hadn't seen that one coming Dave! The Uganda Railway was metre gauge. Here's Limuru station in Kenya in the 1890s. But I like the idea of a fictional British line. You'd need a proper history for it of course, i.e. why the gauge was chosen. Sounds like fun!
    2 points
  2. Railways in New Zealand are 1067mm (3' 6") where the language barrier to do research you mention wouldn't be a problem :-) 1:48 is very close and lots of commercial items in that scale.
    1 point
  3. Interesting ideas there. No idea about location yet, might be somewhere obscure.
    1 point
  4. For a shunter?
    1 point
  5. At least one of the engines built for the metre gauge Davington Light Railway was sold to Brazil when that railway closed after a very brief WW1 existence. It's believed that Davington was metre gauge because a loco was bought in from Gemany just before WW1 and rails laid to suit its gauge which happened to be a metre. You'd have thought they might have noticed that before buying it but history seems to be full of such accidents. The railway was subsequently provided with UK built metre gauge locos and Davington represents the only UK excursion into metre gauge that I'm aware of. However, it's interesting that one of the redundant locos went to Brazil where there was nearly 2000 miles of British owned, metre gauge railway and a good deal of UK built motive power and rolling stock. In spite of a Wiki article which asserts that the GWR (as in Swindon) operated the system under lease between 1901 and 1957, it was I think the Great Western of Brazil Railway (as in not Swindon), much as I would have liked the idea of green locos emblazoned with the arms of London and Bristol pulling into Barao de Mana Station at Rio de Janeiro. But it does set one thinking, doesn't it? Picking up Mikkel's comment about a back story, I was thinking about Sir James Weeks Szlumper (1834-1926) and his interest in 2' gauge railways in Wales and in Devon, on the Lynton & Barnstaple. Had his engineering inclinations been towards metre gauge rather than 2' (he had extensive experience engineering standard gauge as well), some of the "disconnected" railways such as the Lynton & Barnstaple might have ended up as metre gauge. I wonder what drives that choice - if choice it was?
    1 point
  6. The inaccessible side of 45. Rodless, presumably withdrawn on the scrapline, but I don't know when. 850 class tank/boiler fittings, with a cute top feed.
    1 point
  7. In 1:50 32mm gauge scales exactly at 1600mm which is Irish broad gauge also used in South Australia and Victoria. 1:50 (6mm/ft scale as near as dammit) has also been used with 12mm track for two foot gauge and Gordon Gravett used EM gauge standards to represent metre gauge although it actually works out at 3' gauge. There are, of course, many model buses and lorries available in 1:50 along with figures.
    1 point
  8. It'll be interesting to see where this goes. I did toy with 1:36 scale, in which 16.5 mm gauge track represents 1' 11½" gauge with an error of less than 0.5%. I have a steel rule marked in 1/12" divisions! That, like S, would be an all-imperial scale unlike your sensible all-metric scale but I was contemplating prototypes designed in feet and inches. A problem with any esoteric scale is the lack of commercially-available figures.
    1 point
  9. Thanks so much for the prints Ian, it’s the sort of thing that makes or breaks this kind of model. I also have the passenger versions you printed waiting for tyres to be fitted. I’ll try Richard’s suggestion of a split chassis for that one and we’ll see how it goes. Cheers!
    1 point
  10. Glad you could use the wheel prints as casting masters. It all looks brilliant, as ever. Looking forward to eventually seeing some of this sometime in the future. Cheers, Ian
    1 point
  11. There's almost nothing on that engine that you don't have to scratch build, I can see why you needed a dose of courage to even start it - but what a start! Those frames and wheels really give a distinctly 1845 look to the engine - bravo!
    1 point
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