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  1. Now things have settled a bit on here I am going to add a few blogs. It has taken some time to get this painted and finished. A fair bit of messing about with transfers again, I do wish someone would do CR goods lining. All looks a bit rough close up, but passable from a distance I think. A couple of posed pics, the side on official portrait. At rest in the yard. They were a narrow engine, this view just how narrow. Being such an open cab I had a go at putting reasonable detail on the backhead. The 323 class were built for serious shunting work, so the question is can it actually shunt ? Runs pretty smoothly for a scratchbuild, should settle a bit with running in. With regard the the rest of the blog I will wait till that orange banner changes to “The server has replaced all the pics it can, the rest is up to you.“ I do have all the missing pics saved locally so I can fix whatever is still missing at that point.
    14 points
  2. Enthusiasts often refer to this Wolverhampton built class as the 655 class, but the GWR usually described them as 1741s. Thirty-two were built from 1892. They were essentially similar to the earlier 645 and 1501 classes, but were just a little larger with longer overhangs front and rear. The bunker was actually the same size as the 1501 bunker, so the extra three inches of overhang presumably provided more room in the cab. Again they were built with T class boilers. They were numbered rather eccentrically: the first two, 655 and 767, were given numbers previously used by 645s that had been sold. The rest were numbered 1741-1750 and 1771-1790. Almost a subclass were the last 'large' Wolverhampton engines, 2701 to 2720, built 1896/7. The boilers were T class, but had small dimensional variations. Otherwise they were very similar to the 1741s. The 655/1741/2701s tended to merge with the earlier 645 and 1501 classes as time went on. They were fitted with the larger P class Belpaire boilers and pannier tanks. The majority were given enlarged bunkers. Around half were superheated at one stage in their lives and a number gained enclosed cabs. By the 1930s all four classes/sub classes were being treated as a single class. Some were scrapped in the 1930s, but most survived the war. Some twenty-one made it onto the BR books and the last were scrapped in 1950. There were five diagrams for the 1741s and 2701s, covering the variations in boilers and tanks. The last diagram, B65, covered 645, 1501, 1741 and 2701 classes, demonstrating how the classes had merged as they were updated. This first sketch is rather loosely based on diagram M, but the cab in particular has been amended from photos. A cab entrance with a single large radius as shown seemed to be something of a Wolverhampton thing. Swindon cabs usually had a larger radius on the bottom of the cutout than the top. This is the T class boiler, which was pitched appreciably lower than the later P class. Oddly the precise combination of dome position , firebox and T class boiler on the GWR diagram is not known to have actually been fitted to the class. Fortunately for my sketch the firebox top is hidden anyway. This is more closely based on diagram A18, the first diagram with the P class boiler The odd stumpy chimney was by no means universal on this variation. This sketch is based on diagram A42, which is an earlier pannier tank fitment with the P class boiler. And finally this is based on diagram B65, with a full length cab roof and a much extended bunker. The resemblance to the 57s is getting quite marked, but pre group Wolverhampton locomotives could always be recognised by the footplate valance and the shape of the front step. Its important to note that the sketches show just a few of a considerable number of variations. The Wolverhampton pre group classes are something of a modeller's nightmare, since Wolverhampton had their own style, but Swindon tended to put Swindon design features on locomotives that came into their hands. So photos, photos.
    6 points
  3. The recent re-release of the Hornby BR Clan Class was a blessing for many especially with the price of previous issues becoming prohibitive. The model had not been available for a number of years to compound this. Like others I was surprised to find the running boards and rear of tender not painted black on either the late or early crest variations. This has been debated on the Hornby Clan thread. Other issues have concerned a missing top lamp bracket on the smokebox door on a number of models. I was fortunate to pick one of these up from Derails recently for around the £150 region *. with excellent service from them as ever. Well recommended. I took delivery of 72004 Clan MacDonald but wanted to renumber it to 72001 Clan Cameron. In addition to this I decided to spray in the missing black painted running boards and rear of tender. Nameplates were obtained from Fox Transfers and Pacific Models provided the smoke box door number plate. Tamiya masking tape is your friend here and I masked off the areas to be sprayed carefully ensuring all was sealed neatly. Using Tamiya satin black I airbrushed in the the areas to be corrected. Carefully removing the masking tape revealed a neat job with a few areas needing rectification. I hand painted the screw reverser with Precision BR green which appears a good match for the Hornby green. The whistle and surrounding brass work was picked out with Citadel acrylics. Fox transfers London Midland 8 inch numerals made up the number sets with Tamiya masking tape ensuring a straight line. Once dry these were sealed with brush applied Johnson's Kleer along with the rest of the Hornby green painted areas to lift the flat paintwork. This also added some lustre and depth in the paintwork. A false floor was added to the tender bunker and real crushed coal was fixed with PVA. The missing lamp iron was made from the Branson bent up staple method (BBUSM). The excellent as ever Pacific Models number plate was cut out and glued on with PVA. The edges inked in with a black Sharpie permanent marker prior to this. In the next instalment I will have put the Fox Transfers 'Clan Cameron' nameplates on and fitted the detailing pack. Weathering will also be started/finished. From a prototype perspective the earlier releases of the Clan's had a fitting attached to the driver's cab side. I think this was for a tablet catcher. Could anyone confirm this? Also was it only the later build of Clan's to have this feature. Another quandary surrounds nameplate background colours varying from black, green, light blue and possibly red. Can anyone enlighten me? This has been a nice project so far and it has been good to remedy the missing black paintwork. The BR Clan Class is a favourite of mine and more widely travelled than would be expected. Well worth looking at if you are modelling the Scottish and London Midland Region's. Cheers, Mark * Kernow Model Rail Centre have 72004 Clan MacDonald for sale at £159.00 if people are interested.
    3 points
  4. We can rebuild him. We have the technology. Somewhat daunting taking a razor saw to a 'finished' project, but I am really glad I did. Here's the results in video form....
    3 points
  5. My 9 year old daughter has a new name for the fiddle yard. We have talked about the "hand of God" descending on our layouts for years. The fiddle yard is the natural home of the hand of god so it has now become known as "The Yard of God" in our house thanks to our daughter Eleanor!
    2 points
  6. And I am back! Not only doing a blog but at a model railway exhibition! Just as a visitor although this is an achievement after my Covid foiled attempt to get the layout to Ally Pally in March. It was good to get to the Bristol show on Sunday and meet up with a few familiar faces after two and a half years. Not much seems to have changed except the inevitable retreat into long sightedness over took my reluctance to carry even mild reading glasses and I now have two tints of metalic Humbrol brown paint for which I will struggle to find a use. A more conventional brown is what I intended for this the first item of stock for the new project which was finally declared finished today. I say finished, I guess I mean ready for painting but that in itself is a huge achievement. Just to recap a little, about two years ago I decided the next project was going to be Kinver on the Kinver Light Railway. I wanted something a bit unusual and a 3ft 6in semi rural tram model certainly fits that bill. As this was completely uncharted territory and as you might expect, commercial support is zero, I decided to concentrate on the stock first. About a year ago I gave you the first glimpse of my attempts. I quickly became apparent that if I was ever going to complete the twenty vehicles I planned a new tack was needed. This was designing my own etches of course but unfortunately this meant learning CAD which was a bit drawn out and not very blog worthy. So here we have the results of my first solo etching attempt. The subject is the Kinver milk van which was based on one of the original cars used on the line but later converted to accommodate the considerable dairy trade in the area. As this was the smallest and simplest cars this was the obvious place to start. The few pictures I took during construction have disappeared somewhere but it all went together surprisingly easily although the final detailing seems to have taken an age. So here we have Ernie ( older readers will get the name!), all ready for painting. The roof is 3D printed with some etched details. I prototyped it on my machine but this version is from Shapeways who managed a much better finish and was only seven quid. Before I show you the chassis I will explain the reasoning behind it. Over the last year there have been quite a number of prototype chassis kindly and expertly made for me by Trevor. As our aim was to keep everything out of sight as much as possible, several rather tiny and over hyped motors were tried but this only resulted with the test track being renamed 'The Wall of Death'! So, for this one we decided that as there were no windows it would be given the biggest, most bullet proof mechanism possible so that if everything else were to fail at least we would have one which worked. The frames were pantograph milled and the wheels hand made then attached to a reincarnated computer printer and here we have it; Well it looks good and it will trundle around all day. Everything has now been cleaned up and was etch primed this afternoon. Seven more etches are sitting here waiting for attention for two more tram types so there will be more soon.
    2 points
  7. Managed a couple of hours on this while paint was drying. I'm sort of copying LSWR practice with the cab interior, mainly looking at O2's and G6's working on the principal they'll all be similar, as designed by the same man. Here are the two cab sandboxes, they go in the bunker, cab side corners. I presume as they seem to have wooden tops they lift off for filling. I need to add operating levers. Next is the locker that fits on the rear spectacle plate. This is ready for fixing in place. I made it as a simple box then added the door detail to the front. Now back to the frames. I needed to make the compensation beams that sit either side, against the frames. I cut out the basic shape from two pieces of nickel soldered together. When made I tacked them and the frames together, and drill a pilot hole for pivot point. I always on this wheel arrangement, put it a millimetre or so towards the outer end, to put just a little more weight on the leading wheel. I find this leads to less derailing due to it not lifting quite so easily. It works for me, whether the theory is correct or not I'm not sure. I also made a start on cleaning up the springs, I didn't get very far as they need more work than I first thought. The springs had more mould lines than I first saw, and the spring part is actually curved and in need of straightening. Then the usual task of getting the hangers inline and at the correct angle. The lefthand one is almost complete, the others are patiently waiting their turn. Should be able to do more shortly.
    2 points
  8. More on weathering cows. The cows were weathered using Modelmates Mud Brown weathering liquid. It is very easy to use. It is water soluble but dries like ink. To weather the cows I just painted it on and then let it down with a wet brush until I had the colouring I wanted. The cattle dock is weathered using the pastels method. Perhaps I need more cows in there?
    1 point
  9. Funny thing, model railways. Some enjoy the hobby by building and hand knitting their own stock or buildings. At the other extreme, some enjoy a "roundy roundy" train set on a board with some sidings and scenery. Those who enjoy exhibiting will adopt a more "theatrical" style with well made scenery, and a non-scenic back stage so that it looks like you are trainspotting and instead of the train going on to Glasgow or wherever, it's just run round the corner onto a plywood plank. Having done some exhibitions and being involved in the "Dolgellau" retired exhibition layout I tend towards the theatrical. The growth of social media and YouChoob has created another branch of the hobby: the videographer. It's a bit like an exhibition, but without the hassle of getting up early and spending hours building up the layout for the show followed by a couple of hours to dismantle it. Some of you may have seen a series of videos called "Pendeford Yard Today" filmed on Simon Barnes' former layout, which we - as I was involved in their editing and "presentation" - turned into a fictional television station "Bescot Television" mainly to scratch my itch as a fan of old TV presentation and logos and have a bit of fun. Some model enthusiasts take model railways to religious levels of devotion. Neither Simon nor I share that view and we set out to have a laugh. The day some techie called Simon took his rabbit with him to work, which promptly started chewing through the cables causing the morning God Slot with Cannon Ball to go badly wrong caused some puzzlement (actually based on a real life event...) and although Simon has now retired Pendeford Sidings and is building a new project, the closure of "Bescot Television" has left an opportunity for "Wednesford Television" to fill the void for risque ads selling cheap sherry called Cock Marling, named after an actual village in Sussex, or their cider made in the Cock Inn, and their delicious cider infused apple tarts called the Cock Inn Cider Tart. My sense of humour is never going to be called subtle. Anyway, I always intended to do the odd film of the layout for the Choob which is why I spent some time on creating the scenery. However, having now had one successful and two less successful days filming, I think I might be enjoying the videography as much as the layout. There's something therapeutic about getting a train to run around the circuit three or four times whilst I move the camera around doing arty shots. It's like trainspotting, but with a video camera. Unfortunately the past two days filming have been thwarted by technical problems. My camera is a cheap job and has a pish microphone, so I bought an external job which is brilliant. Except when I forget to switch it on, as happened two days ago. I ended up with 60 minutes of silent movie, and seeing as I have spent a fortune on equipping a lot of my stock with sound, I do rather want to showcase the sound effects. So yesterday, I remembered to switch on the microphone. But didn't notice the battery had died. So another 40 minutes of silent movie. Eventually I got the footage you see above, although I forgot to switch off noise reduction which meant the recordings were quiet. Fortunately post production by "Teledu Mawddach" was able to save the day. One thing that has crossed my mind is the fiddle yard, which I rebuilt over the winter, was set up to allow me to run trains to a timetable sequence. However, as I now seem to enjoy the layout as a film set rather than a train set, I'm beginning to think I might need to simplify the fiddle yard, to make it more reliable, allow longer trains and allow me to swap stock more easily. It's sort of working for now but I think I might bite the bullet and just redo the fiddle yard (easily done as it doesn't have the track fully ballasted) with no more than three sidings which will allow them to be longer, have fewer reverse curves and pointwork and permit trains to run round in the circle several times whilst being filmed from different angles. I'm beginning to think the layout is the equivalent of the Forth Bridge or Birmingham City Centre and will never be finished. Wednesford Trainspot May 1988
    1 point
  10. At the end of my previous post , I wrote that the engine and tender would next enter the paint shop. Because the various major components (boiler, firebox, etc.) were all printed separately and simply plugged together, it was easy to paint each part in its appropriate colour, with no masking required. I use acrylic paints, which I like to apply in the manner of water colour. I use an alcohol/water mix to ‘wet’ the surface and then add pigment to achieve the desired depth of colour. For the boiler and firebox, I used ‘Rustoleum Painters Touch’ Dark Green, which has a distinctly bluish hue, mixed with black to achieve my preferred broad-gauge ‘dark blue-green’ appearance. Other parts were painted black, with GWR Coach Brown for the frames. Smaller areas were Chinese Red for the buffer beam and Antique Gold for the bright-work. Once the painting of the body was completed, I added a few small parts, including the curved brackets at the outer ends of firebox and smokebox. I actually printed these brackets together with a set of wheels since, when laid flat on the printer bed, small parts like these only take a few minutes for the whole batch to complete, Small Parts on Printer Bed I have found that the gelled type of superglue is good for attaching such small items. I apply a thin film of glue to the mating surfaces, using a cocktail stick and, while gripping the small part in a pair of tweezers, press it firmly into position against the main body. I check under an illuminated magnifier, to ensure that the alignment is correct. Bracket attached to side of Smokebox By using a very thin film of glue, I ensure there is no unsightly overspill and the joint sets almost immediately. Unfortunately, I couldn’t use my favourite technique of fusing parts together with a soldering iron, because they are in visually exposed positions and the tiny areas involved are too difficult to melt cleanly, without damaging the surface finish. With the brackets attached and the wheels fitted, my models of Aeolus and tender now look like this: Fresh from the paint-shop – Aeolus and tender As I have mentioned before, when commenting on earlier posts, one of my aims in building models is to visualise the progress of engine design throughout the early years of railway development. I find that models do this for me far more effectively than viewing 2D illustrations. For example, this photo of 'Vulcan' (a sister engine to ‘Aeolus’) looks fairly normal, when seen in isolation, but put a model against later designs and the differences in 'scale' become immediately obvious. I am now able to place my model of ‘Aeolus’ head to head with my model of ‘Argus’ , a member of Gooch’s pioneering Fire Fly class: My models of Aeolus and Argus, head-to-head The undersized boiler and lightweight frame construction are clearly seen in ‘Aeolus’, which was originally built in an attempt to meet Brunel’s virtually impossible specifications. When Gooch built his Fire Fly class, he recognised the need for adequate boiler size and heating surfaces, together with robust components able to withstand the rigours of regular express operations. ‘Aeolus’ was built in 1837, while the first of the Fire Fly class appeared in 1840, showing remarkable development within just a few years. Gooch went on to produce the much larger 4-2-2 ‘singles’, staring with ‘Iron Duke’, built in 1847. I only have a model of one of the later re-builds of these engines but the dimensions were much the same as the original engines – the comparison below shows the extraordinary increase in size that these engines represented: My model of Aeolus with Rover-class 4-2-2 My model shows ‘Aeolus’ following a re-build in 1843, which turned it into a small but useful engine for light duties. Apparently, she served for a short period on the Abingdon Branch, which happens to be my home town! This type of usage could be seen as a precursor to the small-engine auto-trains, introduced by the GWR early in the 20th century. Abingdon Station c.1863 Mike
    1 point
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