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  1. I’ve made a detachable scenic extension for The Stables, using magnets. With this, the layout is more or less complete. The extension module was knocked up from 10 mm foamboard. The aim was to portray a tree-lined street at the back of the layout. It had to be detachable so as to facilitate storage in our small flat. The pavements were made in my usual way, flagstones lined out in pencil and later scribed with a round-nosed awl. A black wash for weathering. Afterwards I stood the strips on the side to avoid unsightly puddles forming. For the road itself I used a base of thin plasticard, curved to emulate the camber and with packing along the centerline (crown) for support. The top layer is painted sanding paper (grain 120), dusted with weathering pigments when dry. Vacuum formed retaining walls from Southeastern Finecast. I’ve used these on all four Farthing layouts, as a visual leitmotif. The brick detail is variable but you get quick results and for me they work OK at the back. The trees were made using a combo of techniques, as described in an earlier post. I made the trees a push fit, as I may want to replace them later. I find that masking tape works well as a way to adjust thickness on larger inserts. GWR standard spear fencing from Ratio. As as aside, this 8 second video shows the fence at the front of the layout fitted with magnets. It allows easy track cleaning, photography and storage. These are the little critters, with a toothpick for size. They can hold 130 grams each. Thanks to Dave for introducing me to the weird and wonderful world of magnets! Anyway, back to the scenic extension. I found some posters from the 1901-1903 period, and scaled them down. Houdini toured Britain in 1903. In retrospect, I wonder if the neat Edwardians stuck posters directly to walls. Or were they exclusively mounted on backboards and hoardings? So that was the scenic part of the job, a sort of "3D backscene". In principle, the same module could be used on different layouts. In order to attach it to the main layout, I experimented with magnets again. I first tried these neodymium magnets, capable of holding 2 kgs each, but they were too powerful. I could hardly get them apart and was worried that they would mess with my loco- and point motors (or is that not an issue?). Instead I opted for some less powerful S&W uncoupling magnets. Cheaper magnets of the same strength can no doubt be sourced, but I happened to have a surplus and knew that these were safe for my motors. I also fitted alignment dowels in order to reduce the downward pull of the module. After experiments, I found that a mix of PVA and ultra-fine Polyfilla held the magnets and dowels surprisingly well in the foamboard that I use. The extension then simply clicks on to the layout. Another short video clip, showing the extension being clicked on. The extension sits tight and “floats” with no supports. Obviosuly, that works because the module is narrow and light (650 grams) and is used at the rear of my desk where no one can lean on it. Actual layout modules would need supporting legs. Layout and two-level traverser on my desk. Further layout modules are being planned, and I'm thinking magnets can be a way to join them. So "The Stables" is now more or less complete. To celebrate, here's a selection of photos. A little slice of Farthing in a Copenhagen flat
    67 points
  2. I’ve built a GWR horse-drawn station bus using a modified and detailed P&D Marsh kit. A colourized postcard showing omnibuses in the station forecourt at Minehead. A perusal of period photos suggests that the outside seating wasn’t necessarily the last choice option – on sunny days at least! The forecourt at Teignmouth. Lettering on the door shows the fare and “A. Harvey (?), Proprietor”. Many horse-drawn station bus services were operated by individual entrepreneurs, nearby fashionable hotels, or local agents for the railway companies. Actual GWR-owned station buses certainly existed but were, I suspect, a minority. Old and new at Helston. The GWR’s first motor-driven road service was introduced at Helston in 1903, signalling the beginning of the end for horsedrawn omnibuses. The horse-drawn bus on the right served a local hotel. Phillip Kelley’s two volumes on GWR road vehicles feature a small but useful selection of photo and drawings of GWR horsedrawn buses. Online, a couple of rather interesting GWR omnibuses can be found here (scroll down). An agent-operated GWR service can be seen on the Fairford pages here. For non-GWR omnibuses, Gail Thornton’s website is interesting. The P&D Marsh kit is a fairly simple affair but does represent an actual prototype built by the GWR in 1894. There's a Swindon drawing of it in Kelley’s “Great Western Road Vehicles Appendix”. Towards the end of the build I realised that I had overlooked an actual photo of the vehicle in Kelley’s main volume (“Great Western Road Vehicles” p.29). Assembly of the body leaves you with somewhat unsightly corners, as Mike also commented in his build back in 2013. Repeated applications of filler and sanding helped, followed by primer. The basic components result in a reasonable overall representation of the original vehicle. Bringing it to this stage was a fairly quick exercise, but I decided to add some detailing. First step was some simple seating and glazing. The interior may or may not have been more lavish, but with the roof on very little is visible. The kit’s roof casting is rather thick and does not reflect the pattern on the prototype. A replacement was made by laminating two layers of thin styrene, the top layer being a grid pattern drawn up in Inkscape and printed on my Silhouette. This was fixed with superglue, with temporary holes to allow the fumes to escape so they don’t frost the glazing. Luggage rails were fitted using 0.5 mm straight brass wire. Later I removed the front rail, as I discovered that the prototype didn’t have it. Same thing can be seen on some other omnibuses. Forward-sliding luggage not a problem on slow-breaking vehicles? The drawing and photo show what initially looks like a ladder at the rear. Closer inspection shows it to be three vertical rails with no apparent rungs. My best guess is that they are guard-/guiderails for raising and lowering heavy luggage to and from the roof without damaging the sides. Unless anyone knows better? Anyway, I fitted them using more brass wire. Also seen is the rear passenger step. The one provided in the kit is rather crude and doesn't match the drawing, so I made a simple replacement. The step could be folded down and away for stowage during transport. Discovery of the prototype photo led to some unpleasant surprises. I had overlooked horisontal bolections along the sides and ends, so they were retrofitted using thin wire. There are also what looks like ventilation louvres above the windows (or rainstrips?), these were indicated using thin strips of styrene. I fashioned a pair of coach lamps using old loco lamps from the scrap box, fitted with bits from my tin of watchmakers’ spares. No particular prototype, just a nod to a certain type seen in some photos. Lettering and insignia will have to wait. The prototype photo shows the vehicle in factory finish in 1894, with sans-serif “Great Western Railway” below the windows in quite a small font size (smaller than on goods cartage vehicles), and a simplified garter behind the wheels. My printer can’t do such small lettering to a satisfying standard, so I’ll leave it unlettered until I find one that can. The bus will be parked in the station forecourt at Farthing, with passengers outside. So I decided to add some luggage. The prototype photo shows leather straps (or similar) fitted to the luggage rails, so I painted some thin masking tape to imitate this. I'm not sure about the principles for how luggage was packed on omnibus rooves. Photos suggest pragmatic solutions. I replaced the horse in the kit. I first painted up the mare on the left, but decided it was more of a goods type. So an exchange was made with the pretentious type on the right. Both are from Dart Castings. I normally go with matt varnish for my horse-drawn vehicles, but couldn't resist a satin finish in this case. I'm pondering my choice of driver. Current offerings aren't that good, so will probably modify a seated passenger. No reins, too impractical with my current layout arrangements. So that's yet another horse-drawn vehicle for Farthing. Good thing I've got a big stable block! There are plans afoot for an early motor bus, but that's another story.
    61 points
  3. Projects over the summer have included trees. The original inspiration came from the tree-lined perimeters of Reading’s Vastern Road and King’s Meadow goods yards. Vastern Road yard, Reading, 1948. Source: Britain from above. The trees here were quite close to the track along some sections. Earlier photos from the 1900s show larger trees, so they must have been a feature from at least the 1880s. Vastern Road yard, Reading, 1948. Source: Britain from above. Apart from a bit of dabbling ages ago, this was my first real attempt at trees. It does show! But for what it's worth, here's a summary of how I did them. The basic armature was made from Treemendus 0.5 mm wire, cut to 150 mm lengths of which I used 45 per tree for my purposes. Similar wire can be obtained from florists. To form the trees, I used the method suggested by Treemendus, whereby one wire is twisted around others (rather than twisting all wires). This is certainly a quick method, but the outer wire does show. Treemendus recommend using masking tape in order to smooth out the trunk and main branches. This helps, but also adds to the thickness. Accordingly, I may use fewer wires per tree for the next batch. Once done, the armatures were coated in Treemendus bark powder. This can be sanded for a smoother look. For the crown and foliage I diverted from the Treemendus approach and instead used Heki sea foam, each piece glued to the armature with superglue. The pods can be removed, but I didn’t bother as the foliage I used conceals it. The crown was sprayed with a few quick coats of light brown/grey. I used Liquitex, these are low-toxic water based spraypaint for artists. Foliage was added using “coarse turf” from Woodlands scenic. This is the “burnt grass” shade. The foliage was attached using Hob-e-Tac- glue, non-toxic and very sticky. The foliage sticks to the outer reaches of the seafoam, leaving a nice natural branch structure behind it. A coat of Woodlands “scenic cement” was sprayed on to further stick things down. This darkens the foliage somewhat, so I only did one coat. As these are planted urban trees, they needed to be fairly uniform yet individually different. It helped to build them alongside each other. I found that it was possible to make up individual bits of sea-foam twigs and retro-fit them to the trees. That way, any areas that I was unhappy with could be improved. The species is nominally London Plane-ish, although I admittedly concentrated more on just learning the techniques. I did try to indicate the mottled/patchy look of the bark with a paintbrush, but it doesn't show up well and needs more work. The original plan was to have 3-4 trees at the front of the layout. I liked the views beneath the canopy. And the shadow effect when the sun came in through our windows. But from a distance the layout seemed too “front loaded” and forbidding. Trying out various configurations I was struck by how the different positioning of trees can give very different impressions. E.g., compare these two photos: In the end I opted for the arrangement seen below. This gives me street trees but also an open view. It requires an extension of the layout at the back, featuring another road and - you'll be relieved to hear - a backscene. This is currently being built. It's all been an interesting exercise. I will probably keep this first batch of trees for the time being, but have started experimenting with alternative methods, including natural plants. More on that later.
    50 points
  4. I’m building a Slaters kit for a GWR bogie clerestory third to diagram C10. The coach is intended for a motley Edwardian stopping train consisting of a variety of carriage styles, as was common on the GWR in the 1900s. But first it will be used in a re-enactment of the 1911 railway strike, and is therefore in the 1908-1912 all brown livery (as yet un-lined). This post summarizes the build. It's a long post but I'm told the kits are due back on the market so perhaps this can help give others an impression of what's involved and avoid my mistakes! What you get. Lots of bits. Wheels weren’t included. The plastic components are crisp and detailed. I did spend some time cleaning away flash. The larger bits of flash are minimal and not a problem, but there are thin strips of flash along the upper edges of the windows which require care. I used Limonene (two coats) to bond the sides, which worked well enough. The Magnetic Clamps are from Smart Models. The partitions were then fitted, followed by the roof. I opened out the notches in the roof for the partitions, so that the roof could be taken on and off during the build. The seats are quickly made and fit nicely in the compartments - not always the case with kit seats! The clerestory structure was quickly built up. The ends and clerestory parts are “handed” with different details at each end. The underframe, solebars and headstocks were then fitted. Etched brass snuck in via the "racking plate" , which was glued in place. I then turned to the bogies. They fold up nicely. One mistake was to put off strengthening the stepboard supports with solder. They are very fragile and will soon break off otherwise. The photo shows the ones I managed to rescue, the rest were replaced with wire later on. The inside frame and rocking mechanism was then made. The principle of the kits - at least those produced until now - is that the wheels run in the inside frame using "inside bearings". Brass wire hold the wheels in place and allow sprung movement. This design has drawn critical comments from people who struggled to get good running. I understand that it will be changed when the kits are re-released. In any case, I lacked the correct axles so decided to go for an alternative approach, using Alan Gibson pinpoint axles in ordinary bearings. Thanks to @Darwinian for the idea. For this approach to work, the pinpoint bearings must fit perfectly into the recessed aperture around the hole in the bogie sides - seen here - and must be of the right depth. Otherwise the sides will splay. Using the right bearings was therefore critical. I tried various types including 2mm Top Hat bearings but these would not accommodate the axles within the bogie frames. Eventually I used these waisted bearings plundered from old Coopercraft kits, as seen above. The ends of the bearings did need some filing so that the axleboxes would fit over them. Filing the inside of the axleboxes also helped. With this simplified approach the inner frame was not strictly required, but I decided to fit it anyway to add strength and hold the rocking mechanism. Are you still awake? Captions welcome. The bogie interiors were gradually becoming inaccessible so I primed them and painted the Mansell wheels. The latter are brownish red as a loose indication of varnished redwood (see good discussion on Western Thunder). A silly mistake cost me dearly. I forgot to fit brake shoes until the wheels were firmly in place. Retrofitting the 16 shoes was a hellish task. As a result the various brake pull yokes didn’t fit properly, so much of that is just indicated with brass wire. Once back on track, the cross stays and scroll irons were fitted. There are useful close-ups and drawings of Dean bogies in Russell's GWR Coaches Part 1 p. 93-95. The scroll irons were then cut to allow the bogie to rotate. Not exactly neat cuts, they were filed later. I do need a proper flush cutter. In order for the bogies to rotate, the frames have to be modified at each end. I hope I got the position of the gas cylinders right. I peered into the murky darkness of prototype photos and Didcot's C10, which suggests it's more or less OK. Next the underframe details were fitted. I shortened the queen posts, as I felt the truss rods ended up too low if fitted as intended. Prototype photos like this one (and the C10 at Didcot) shows them higher up and fairly discrete. Unless truss rods changed over the years? I didn't fancy "trapping" the bogies with the brake pull rods, so just fitted this single rod held by (unprototypical) vertical mounts. The bogie can be slid out underneath it. Bit of a bodge but at least something is there for those rare glimpses. The main buffer components. There’s an option of springing them, though I didn’t use it. The instructions state that the buffers "consisted of a curved oval steel plate bolted onto a round buffer head". The outer plate needs to be lightly curved and then fitted to the buffer heads. I didn't make a good job of this, it looks a bit odd. If I do another one I'll see if ready-made buffers can be obtained instead. Next the stepboard hangers went on. This required patience as the hangers, solebars and stepboards all need modification for the parts to fit, as also indicated in the instructions. The material used for the stepboards somehow managed to be both bendy and brittle at the time, though note that this is a secondhand kit of some age. My adjustable multi-purpose jig a.k.a. “The Piano” saved the day. The lower stepboards were then fitted. I later found that the bogie stepboards had to be shortened approx. 1,5 mm to clear the central stepboard. The hangers for the latter also need modification or they will stick out oddly. It’s striking what a difference stepboards make to the appearance of a coach. From there on it was plain sailing. The roof was detailed using the as lamp tops in the kit, and 0.3mm (0.010") brass wire. Steps fitted at one end, and putty to fill out the corner joins. In 1911 the GWR experimented with Bluetack on buffers in response to complaints about rough riding. The idea was abandoned when a Slip coach destined for Weymouth was found still attached at Penzance. After priming, the interior was painted. I decided to leave the 48 picture frames untouched. Chris: I did try painting them as you suggested but soon realized that it should have been done while the partitions were still on the sprue. The coach sides were brush-painted with my normal method of multiple coats (5 in this case) of much thinned Vallejo acrylics, using a broad flat brush. In the photo a fresh coat is being applied. The coach was painted all-brown as per the 1908-1912 livery. The photos I have show light to dark grey rooves (probably the usual darkening) with no brown beneath the rainstrips. Commode- and door handles were then added, followed by lettering and insignia. The 1908 livery had the garter in the center, and crests either side with "GWR" above. The position of the crests at the outer ends makes for an unbalanced look and takes some getting used to. But that's how it appears in this crop of a 1911 photo of a scene I'll be modelling. Perhaps this extreme position of the crests was in fact a particular feature of the little explored 1908-1912 livery - brakes excepted? Photos of bogie coaches in the all brown livery are rare, but there is a Toplight in Russell 's GWR coaches which also has the crests just before the last passenger door at each end. The photo in Slinn's Great Western Way has the crests further in, but on inspection that coach has guard doors at each end, and so there would not have been room to put the crests further out on that particular coach (crests were kept clear of doors). Of course in 1912 the GWR did move the crests further in, with just a single "GWR" placed above the garter. The 1908 livery saw the introduction of black ends. The hand rails are 0.3 mm wire from Wizard Models, which I found easier to shape than the wire in the kit. Vaccuum pipes and couplings to follow. So far I have never lined my Edwardian coaches, a pragmatic decision in order to get things built and running. In this case it does add to the austere appearance though. Perhaps it's time to try out an Easi-Liner pen. Anyway, that's the current state of play. My original plan was to use this livery for a photo shoot of selected 1911 scenes and then repaint it in pre-1906 livery with cream panels. However I must admit that the sombre look is growing on me. Something to ponder.
    46 points
  5. I now have four small layouts in the Farthing series, each of which can be operated on my desk or the dining table. That should satisfy my daily operating needs for a while, allowing me to take on Farthing’s main station building and platforms. For this I’m returning to the Newbury theme. When Newbury station was rebuilt during 1908-1910 four lines were laid, with loop lines along the Up and Down platforms and through lines in the center. This resulted in the above arrangement. Source: Britain from Above. As we already know, Farthing’s history and layout as a junction station was very similar to Newbury. So I’ve grabbed this part of the Newbury trackplan and adapted it for Farthing. The two remaining bays are left out for now, but may follow later in one form or another. As usual it’s very simple. We live in a small flat and I don’t have a layout room, so I’ll join up four modules on the dining table. The modules are stored in an attic room so need to be short and narrow. We have two light work-desks which can be arranged at each end for 150 cm cassettes to slide on. It won’t be practical for my daily running sessions, this is for special occasions. Though limited, the plan is not completely without operational scope, as listed here. The run isn’t that long but I'd rather do something than nothing. If circumstances allow, future modules can add more length. One module – the Branch Bay – was the first of the Farthing layouts and so is already done. It just needs the fascia removed, allowing another module to be fitted in front. I’ll still be able to operate it separately during my daily sessions. I’ve now begun the second module. It will be a scenic board, featuring Farthing’s main station building, viewable from both sides. As simple as it gets. Except that I have to build this. The station building will be a model of the main Up side building at Newbury. It is of course still there and can be seen in Google Streetview. Handy when you live across the North Sea during a pandemic. The architectural style at Newbury was not unique. This is Westbury, where the style appears to have originated when Westbury station was rebuilt in 1899 – indeed Adrian Vaughan calls it the “Westbury style” in his book on GWR architecture. Source: Wikipedia Commons. A distinctive feature of the style was the shape and decoration of the limestone lintels above rounded windows. The style was also employed on some other GWR stations in the early 1900s, although without the gables. There were several on the GWR/GCR New Line. This is Bicester North, built 1910. Source: Chiltern Railways on Pinterest. I spotted a simpler variant in photos of Tyseley, built 1906. Source: Wikipedia Commons. Back at Newbury, the Upside building is a long structure, as seen here on Google Earth using the handy measuring tool. In 4mm scale it comes out at just under 84 cms. The sensible approach would be to do a compressed version. But I need a challenge, so will do the whole thing. Here’s a GWR outline drawing of Newbury, with only the wording changed to match Farthing. It’s longer than some of my existing layouts! I’ll build the structure in three main parts, joined by magnets. I anticipate compromises along the way, so expect pragmatism. Work has begun. I’m tracing the GWR outline drawing in Inkscape in preparation for cutting out brick sheets on my Silhouette Cutter. The GWR drawing is rather rough, but OK for my purposes and I have historical and contemporary photos to work from. I'm still to decide whether I'll also build the footbridge, seen above. A big task, but tempting. Especially because it’s gone now, removed in 2018 for OLE installation. Slowly, the old world disappears. But modellers are sorcerers, we can bring things back.
    44 points
  6. I wanted some Private Owners for Farthing, so have built a couple of Powsides kits, i.e. painted and pre-lettered Slaters kits. I opted for two Gloucester designs to RCH 1887 specifications, one a 5-plank side-door wagon, the other a 7-plank side- and end-door job. I like the overall appearance, although TBH the small lettering isn’t quite up to current standards. Perhaps I was unlucky, they look fine on the website. The kits have blank interior sides, so the moulding pips were filed away and planking was indicated with a scriber. The instructions recommend joining all sides first, then mounting the floor inside. I struggled a bit with this, the floor wasn’t a perfect fit and the sides were lightly curved. Some dismantling and remedial work ensued, but I got there in the end. I used waisted pin-point bearings from MJT. Split spoke wheels on one wagon, and plain spokes for the other one because I ran out. Did some of these wagons eventually receive plain spoke wheels? Otherwise I’ll swop the erroneous set later. Some of the small lettering was a bit damaged or missing as the kits came. I touched it up as best I could. Some bits I simply painted over. I’d rather have absent lettering than odd lettering. The built-up wagons. Having admired Dave’s lovely builds of the 7mm versions of these kits, I decided to indicate the interior ironwork as he has done. For this I simply used strips of Evergreen (painted darker after this shot). Good interior photos of these wagons are rare, so drawing on discussion by Stephen and other helpful RMwebbers I drew up the above sketch to guide my detailing of the interior. Please note that this is my own rough and ready rendering. There are various unknowns and no one has “signed off” on this sketch. Anyone interested should consult Stephen’s drawing and info here. Interior ironwork in place. The kit does include a hinge for the end door. On some wagon types this was positioned above the top plank, but in this case I fitted it just behind the top plank, based on this discussion. Archer’s rivet transfers at the fixed ends. Stephen pointed out the “big nuts” that appear on the ends of many Gloucester wagons, extending from the diagonal irons inside. Looking at photos they seem to have been present on both 5-, 6- and 7-planks as seen here left to right (obviously only at fixed ends). The nuts don’t feature in the kit, so I added them. On the 7-planker I drilled holes and stuck in bits of brass. This proved tricky as it’s just by the corner joins, so on the 5-planker I Mek-Pak’ed on bits of plastic rod instead, as seen above. As usual: Liquid Gravity and 3mm Sprat & Winkles. I'm always amazed how much difference weight makes to the "feel" of a wagon. The couplings too: Ugly they may be, but they turn it into a working vehicle. Weathering the interior with pigments. The “Sinai Dust” seen here is courtesy of the late Mick Bonwick. Thank you, Mick. The Ayres wagon. Phil Parker uses a fibre glass brush to fade the lettering on printed RTR wagons. But these are transfers, so would tear (I did try). Instead I lightly dry-brushed base colour over the lettering. Helps a bit, but not quite as effective. C&G Ayres still exist as a well-known Reading removal company and former GWR cartage agent. This (very) close crop shows one of their removal containers at Reading ca. 1905. But a search of the British Newspaper Archive showed that C&G Ayres were also at one time coal traders [Source: Reading Mercury Oxford Gazette March 9, 1918]. So I need to decide whether to designate the Ayres wagon for coal or furniture. I wonder if this explains the difference between the red Powsides livery and the green wagon livery that I normally associate the company with. The Weedon wagon. You can just make out the nuts on the ends, but they aren't really noticeable. The effort would arguably have been better spent detailing the brake gear! I had assumed the Weedon Brothers were mainly coal and coke merchants, but again newspapers and directories of the time offered further info. [Source: Kelly's Directory of Berks, Bucks & Oxon, 1911]. It seems that manure was also a key aspect of their business. The company features on the right in this directory clipping - amongst lime burners, loan offices, lunatic asylums and other essentials of progress! Though based at Goring, the Weedon Brothers had stores in a number of places, as illustrated in the above 1889 advert. I’m inclined to designate the wagon for manure rather than coal. I wonder what that would mean for the weathering? Richard's latest book on Wiltshire Private Owners is firmly on my wishlist. Anyway, the wagons are now running at Farthing. Here's No. 1897 knocking them about in the sidings behind the stables. Overall I've enjoyed the build. May have a go at applying my own transfers next time. It's just a couple of plastic wagons of course, but I learnt a lot along the way. That's one of the great things about modelling, every build is an entry point to railway history. Thanks to everyone for the help.
    43 points
  7. I’m building an 1854 Pannier Tank for Farthing in ca. 1919 condition, using a modified Hornby 2721 body, a Bachmann 57xx chassis and various parts from SEF and Brassmasters. Pure it is not. The project has been described on occasion in my workbench thread, but in a fragmented manner. This post summarizes progress to date. Prepare for many close-ups of green plastic Background It's a bit of a nostalgia project. I wanted to do something with the old Hornby 2721, a model I've had a liking for since first seeing it in the magical Hornby 1980 catalogue at the tender age of 11. Note the "X", it was high on my wish list back then. When I finally got one several decades later the running was a disappointment. So it went to sleep in The Big Box of Lost Souls, until I decided to bring it back to life. The original plan was to make a backdated 2721, but along the way I decided to do the outwardly very similar 1854 PT class instead. The components I'm using match an 1854 PT a bit better, including the plain Bachmann conrods and the absence of visible springs behind the Hornby splashers (a feature of the 2721s). The 1854s were also a bit more widely dispersed during the period in question. Above, I have plotted the 1921 allocations of the 1854s and 2721s into Google Maps. See details below this post. So the goal is a pragmatic 1854 PT in ca. 1919 condition, a period I have a growing interest in. Ironically I have yet to find a 1919 photo of an 1854 PT. Instead I'm extrapolating from early 1920s photos (including a couple on the gwr.org.uk pannier page), and drawings in the Finney/Brassmasters kit instructions and Russell's "Pictorial Record of Great Western Engines" Vol 1. Thanks to Brassmasters for making their instructions freely available, I try to repay by purchasing fittings from them. The RCTS "Locomotives of the GWR" part 5 is a key reference. Jim's book "An Introduction to Great Western Locomotive Development" has also been useful. Chassis and body I’m using a Bachmann 57xx/8750 chassis for the project. Various chassis versions exist, including 32-200 (left) and 31-900 (right). I’m using the former, which is shorter and lower. Closer look at the chassis. The weight block has been removed to test the fit. Later it went back on. The Bachmann chassis and Hornby body. There are various well-known issues with the Hornby 2721. Hornby used a Jinty chassis, and so the splashers don’t line up with the more correctly dimensioned Bachmann chassis. The frames and bunker are also too long, and there’s no daylight under the boiler. The chimney is appealing, but wrong shape. I disassembled the body and was surprised to see that the tank/boiler top is a separate component, well disguised under the handrail. Butchery The first job was to get some light under the boiler/panniers. I used a scalpel, scoring repeatedly along the edges of the moulded sides with a used blade, then eventually cutting through with the tip of a sharp new blade. And there was light. Then the interior was cut, carved and hacked about until the chassis was a good fit along the sides and ends. The photo is early on in the process, a good deal of material was removed. The chassis and modified body. There’s ample room for the Bachmann weight block, so that was re-fitted. The backhead was cut away to allow room for the gears. The motor does protrude a bit into the cab, but will disappear behind a new backhead. From the side. Footplate The Hornby body is too long for both an 1854 and a 2721. This is in fact the 2721 drawing from when that was the aim, but the principle is the same for the 1854. So I shortened the footplate by about 2,5 mm at each end, doing cut-and-shut. Splashers The center splashers, being out of line, were then attacked along with the toolbox. The incorrectly positioned toolboxes, half-relief injectors, and very low sandboxes were also chopped off. I considered scratch building the replacement splashers as per my Dean Goods rebuild, but wasn’t in the mood. So I dug out a broken old Finecast 1854 that came with an ebay job lot. The Finecast splashers were cut off, cleaned up and fitted to the Hornby footplate. There are no rear splashers on the Hornby body, so these were also fitted. Will fit bands to the front splasher later. Bunker and Backhead For the bunker I again turned to the old Finecast 1854… …and cleaned up the parts as best I could. The 1854s and 2721s had the same frame and cab width, so in theory the 1854 bunker should be a direct match, but it was too narrow. I thought the Hornby body must be wrong, but checking the measurements again showed that the Finecast bunker isn’t as wide as it should be. Food for thought! Anyway, I rebuilt the bunker with styrene panels. Later, plated coal rails were fitted. The original Hornby weight block was filed to suit. Along with the weight block on the Bachmann chassis, the loco now runs quite nicely. The worm and gears were concealed using an old Bachmann backhead, moved slightly back and with a raised section of cab floor beneath it. I’ve done this before, once the crew are fitted I don't notice it. Beneath the tanks The Hornby balance pipe is a blob one each side of the motor block, so I made some new blobs. New firebox sides and rear tank supports (adapted to allow room for the injectors) were also made. Drawings of 1854 and 2721 PTs show the balance pipe fitted just behind the front splasher, but photos suggest that they were soon relocated to a position nearer the center of the tanks. So that’s what I have done. Removal of the “skirts” on the Hornby body exposes the Bachmann motor and lets too much light in. Strips of brass sheet were curved, painted and fitted each side to hide the motor. Testing for shorts showed no problems. Fittings The Hornby tank top isn’t that bad, but the chimney (odd shape), tank fillers (too small) and grab rails (moulded lump) had to go. I'm wondering what the small pipes/cables running along the top are for, and when they were fitted. The chimney was sawn off, and the tank fillers removed (vertical slices in both directions, followed by a parallel cut along the bottom). The bluetack is for protecting details. Finney/Brassmasters chimney from the 1854/2721 kit, the rest is from Alan Gibson. Dry fit of the Finney chimney and tank fillers. The safety valve cover is so far an RTR item, can’t seem to find the appropriate shape in brass. I'm confused about the chimney position, forward or center on smokebox? I'm aiming for a pre-superheated version, but despite good photos on gwr.org.uk, I can't work out what it implies in my case. Tank vents from bits of filed styrene, seen here with the Alan Gibson tank fillers. Smokebox The front also needed work. As it comes, the Hornby body has a Churchward pressed steel front. I rather like it. But pre-1920 tank smokebox fronts tended to be plain, so it was all sanded away. Difficult, and it shows. A ring was added to the smokebox door, not quite the dished look but better than nothing. Alan Gibson door darts fitted, and new steps from scrap bits of brass. Tank and cab sides Pannier tanks fitted before ca. 1917 were flush-riveted. After that they were snap head rivetted (1917-1924) and then had welded seams (after 1924). I decided that my loco was fitted with panniers before 1917, and therefore sanded away the Hornby rivets. That took the shine off her! The lower cabsides are too narrow on the Hornby body, so these have been extended. This photo also shows the plated coal rails on the bunker (which is still loose). After a hiatus the project is now on the move again. I'm making a new cab roof and have started fitting details. More on that later. Thanks to all who helped with info and advice.
    43 points
  8. Having recently acquired a discarded dandy horse from a house clearance off the Old Kent Road, Jean Floret de Cauliflower is quite the man about town. At least, his own frisky imagination tells him so. However, this past week he has consistently upset every innocent pedestrian and skittish filly in Bermondsey. Perhaps it is just as well that his wreckless behaviour may soon be brought to a dramatic finale. The work of our tiny but destructive foe Anobium Punctatum - the common furniture beetle - has gone entirely unnoticed by Jean. The relentless efforts of this miniature pest will surely result in his wooden steed disintegrating in a most undignified manner forcing a swift conclusion to his irksome escapades. Rider and Draisienne made from scratch in 4mm scale over three evenings this week
    42 points
  9. Apologies for the lack of blog entries over the last few months, life sometimes gets in the way of modelling! I’ve managed to rupture my Achilles’ tendon, so I’m hopping about in a Vacoped boot with my ankle locked in an equinus position. Getting up the steps into the workshop is a bit of a hassle, so as way of compensating for not being able to play trains I’ve been building something not railway related I’ve long been fascinated by WW1 aircraft and used to build and fly radio controlled balsa versions, before returning to railway modelling 20 or so years ago. Hasegawa make a 1/16 scale plastic kit of a Sopwith Camel without its fabric covering, so all the ribs and stringers are exposed in the finished model. I’ve fancied having a go at simulating wood grain using oil paints on top of a base coat for a while now and after watching videos on YouTube felt confident enough to have a go. Hopefully the results on the model are convincing, it certainly looks better to my eye than the brown plastic the kit was moulded in! I wanted to represent the turnbuckles on the rigging wires which the kit does not include, but found some suitable tubing in a fishing tackle shop meant for tying flies It’s been an interesting diversion and I’m pleased with the end result, but I promise I will get on and finish that rake of coaches I started two years ago soon! Here are some pictures of the finished model. Until next time! Best wishes Dave
    37 points
  10. Another year passes. I was running some trains and in my head as the carriages drew level with the platform I heard the guard shout, “ This is, er is ….. Um, well dunno where we are really, but we have arrived……….” Yep, I have never got round to making any running in boards, so I though I had better address that pronto. There we go, now we know where we are. The 670 Class leaves Kelvinbank yard in the winter gloom. The Grampian corridor stock on a christmas excursion. Some sepia, boding snow. No fun being a brakesman. But the advertising is there to remind us of summer holidays. I wish everyone the compliments of the season, I hope you al get some quality modelling time.
    34 points
  11. Well it's been a while since I posted anything on this thread, almost since the beginning of the first lock down in fact. Whilst I have been concentrating on my Stonehouse St James covid layout in the intervening period, I did decide to complete the signal box for Cheddar. The box itself is a Saxby and Farmer Type 3 and as I noted last time, this was drawn up in Coreldraw and the parts cut by York Modelmaking. What followed was a fairly simple assembly of parts, correcting the various mistakes I made along the way or, as is normally the case when I unearthed a photo after the event showing that some of my assumptions weren't correct! The sides are 1mm MDF with the brickwork pattern rendered . The windows are Rowmark, stuck to perspex with spray mount. The plinth is Slaters plasticard. The interior is an old Springside kit I had kicking around. I think the levers are painted correctly! Tiles are York self adhesive and other bits and pieces are odds and sods of plasticard, wire and a bit of perspex for the lamp. The nameplate was custom etched by Light Railway Stores. As with all things, now it's finished I can see a few things that niggle me but the funny thing is the front of the box will face the operators, not the public when it all gets plonked onto the layout. There's a bit of weathering required to the soffit boards but overall it's getting there. Happier to report that a house move shouldn't be too far away now. Rest assured the new abode has suitable space for layout erection, albeit not all at the same time!
    34 points
  12. Well it’s been 3 days since the Uckfield show and my knees have finally recovered from standing for two days and grubbing around under baseboards during set up The layout behaved it’s self and despite the fact that I can either talk to the public or operate the layout, but can’t do both at the same time everything went to plan! I collected the hire van at 10.00am on the Friday morning and with the help of my pal and master fiddleyard operator Roger the van was loaded with the layout by 11.30 am. The new extension board fitted in the van without any problems, we’re obviously getting better at this packing lark We were on the road before midday and arrived in East Sussex by about 3.30pm, it was a pretty uneventful journey despite the rigours of the dreaded M25! Set up in the exhibition hall started at 6.00pm, so with a couple of hours to kill and being so close we decided it would be rude not to pop in and visit the Bluebell Railway The station building is delightful, with an ornate half timbered porch and tiled upper storey, I particularly liked the ornate chimney stacks. The ticket office and waiting rooms were equally lovely, all they needed was a roaring coal fire in the grate to add to the ambiance! We were greeted in the platform by a rake of magnificent wood finished Metropolitan coaches, Sherton Abbas definitely needs an excuse for a model of one of these! Maunsell’s splendid S15 class number 847 was in steam, so we spent a happy hour or so on the platform watching it run round and depart with an excursion. The couple of hours at Sheffield Park passed all to quickly, but we left by 5.30pm to make our way to the Civic Centre at Uckfield and get the layout set up. We met my other pal Al at the hall and had the layout set up in about an hour and a half. The new extension board fitted into place without any problems, which was a relief as there’s insufficient space in my workshop to set the layout up in its entirety! After a good night’s sleep at the local Premier Inn, we arrived at the exhibition hall for 8.00am to get the stock set up and get the layout ready for the public. An excellent breakfast was provided by the Uckfield club, as were copious amounts of tea, coffee and biscuits during the day, I can honestly say I’ve never been to such a well organised show 10 minutes before the show opened Roger thought it might be a good plan to run a passenger train through the layout. It departed the fiddle yard and then abruptly came to a sudden halt as it entered the new scenic board! Although I’d tested the new board by pushing a few wagons and running some locos, I hadn’t considered that my brake third coaches have duckets and were consequently too wide to enter the layout Some frantic adjustments were made with a hacksaw and although the aperture now looks like a dogs chewed it trains passed through all weekend without any further problems! We had an excellent evening meal on Saturday evening hosted by the club at the Hare & Hounds in Framfied. After the meal our host Adrian had organised an excellent quiz, which everyone thoroughly enjoyed. There was then a presentation of the cup for the best layout as voted for by the exhibitors and traders and I’m delighted to say that Sherton Abbas won! There were some truly excellent other layouts at the show, so being awarded this award was a huge surprise and made the whole weekend even more special. The show was a little quieter on Sunday which gave me chance to have a better look at the rest of the show and chat to other exhibitors. Ian Smith’s Modbury is quite exceptional, the locos are like pieces of jewellery and the despite the small size of 2mm the level of detail is remarkable! Martin Finley’s Newton Heath Works was also fabulous and a perfect example of how to do a cameo layout properly. I couldn’t resist taking a picture of the cup on the layout, as you can see it’s a pretty magnificent trophy! The show finished at 5.00 pm on Sunday and the layout was unassembled and back in the van by ten past six, which I think is probably our best break down time ever The M3 / M25 was a delightful experience as always, but we got back to Cardiff and had the layout unloaded and back in the workshop before 11.30 pm. Huge thanks to both Roger and Al for all their help during the weekend and to Adrian for inviting us to such a rewarding well organised event. Best wishes to all, particularly those that came to the exhibition and came for a chat! Dave
    32 points
  13. A bit of progress. Four bodies are now on frames and I have been playing on the layout to iron out any running issues. I wanted to try and get it to look as if the coaches are properly coupled. Even with springs I found that screw couplings didn’t really keep the buffers together on curves, and I wanted the buffers to compress to take up and rattle. I came up with this. Essentially half an aj on a diamond spring it is stiffer then the buffer springs but can be extended to couple the coaches. Making it bogie pivot to bogie pivot also gets round the tendency for a screw coupling to be very tight at an angle when the coaches enter a curve or on reverse curves. Its also reversible, coaches can be turned round. A lot of time has been spent messing about with corridor connections. Tried all sorts including magnets but none got round the problem of getting the faces of the corridor connections to actually line up particularly on a reverse curve or the side forces on the ends of the coach caused running issues. Well, I was watching a bit of real train video and it dawned on me. What the eye notices is the faces of corridor connections, not the part where they meet the coach. Conveniently the end of the coach has a slot in it, actually the window of the corridor connection internal door. A bit more lateral thinking. Three bits of foam, medium stiffness but fairly flexible. This is just a proof of concept, needs some rework to tidy it all up. So thats how they sit between coaches, and how they sit on a curve. A bit of a heath robinson solution perhaps, but does it work when a train is running on the layout ? A bit of rough video, comments welcome. The big pug stretching its legs. I think that gives me the confidence to move on to the next stage, paintwork and interior details. Er , how many antimacassars ?
    32 points
  14. One of the CR engines I have always fancied making is the 323 class, also known as the Jubilee Tanks, first built 1887. There is no kit, so they are rarely modelled, though Jim Watt has made a lovely example in 2 mm fs. A pic. The first issue is the wheels. As built they had 4’ 6” 10 spoke T section wheels. Later rebuilds had plain spokes, but thats after my time period. Nobody makes them, nearest offering is Gibson 11 plain spoke, so I’m going to have a go at converting them. Some parts cut out with the silhouette. The rear face of the wheel is skimmed down very carefully on the lathe. Over the christmas period I fitted a new motor to the lathe, one of the sewing machine types with electronic speed control. I really don’t know how I managed with the old 1920s open frame motor it used to have. Thanks to snitzl for that tip. The silhouette cut parts are then glued to the wheels. The parts cleaned up, assembled and a spray of paint. I feel that they do look sufficiently like the prototype, certainly in terms of normal viewing distances on the layout. I know that there have been developments in printing custom wheel centres to fit manufacturers tyres, but for now I am content to have a go with the resources available to me.
    32 points
  15. Ex petty officer Solly is in a bit of a pickle. Having recently been suspended from active naval service owing to a regrettable incident with a cannon, he has decided to consume an increasing quantity of London’s best porter. Unfortunately, not only did the calamity result in the loss of his right leg below the knee, it also neatly removed his left thumb. He now has to swap his crutch to the left in order to hold a bottle in his right hand. After several bottles this balancing act can prove increasingly challenging. Meanwhile, Archibald Plummer calmly makes his way past the undignified display. He’s seen it all before and he knows it rarely ends well. A cab clatters past the houses at Greyhound Place. Inside, William Rolls peruses the morning papers on the way to his floor cloth manufactory. In January 1837, James Braby a coach builder of Duke Street, Lambeth was granted patent no.7279 to cover ‘Certain Improvements in the Construction of Carriages’. His patent was well illustrated with drawings of three designs for hackney carriages and one omnibus. The first, a one horse hackney carriage is the subject of my model. It's cast in white metal as a ‘kit’ and the driver, a heavily modified ModelU character. The horse was a spare from the scrap box. Whether James Braby actually built any of these carriages is unknown. Unlike many inventors he was at least in a position to manufacture his designs, even if only in model form to promote his ideas to prospective clients. Figures are ModelU’s finest (with minor and occasionally major modifications). The layout is my ongoing project to recreate Bricklayers Arms, Bermondsey, c.1845 in 4mm scale. Apologies for the low resolution of these images, I must buy a new camera!
    32 points
  16. Another of my 'seemed like a good idea at the time' projects last summer was to create kits for each of the principal carriages of the London & Birmingham Railway. Once again this was to be another diversion from Bricklayers Arms but a change is as good as a break, no? Together with a good friend Tom Nicholls who has provided endless information, drawings, research and above all encouragement, I started at the bottom with the intention of working my way up. In other words, the first was the open third class carriage (if you can call it a carriage at all) and the open-sided second. These have been created as fairly straightforward cast kits with one resin-cast block for the seats. This turned out to be quite a good idea as making seats in styrene is very boring indeed. The sole bars, axle guards and springs are all part of the side so the carriage went together quite quickly. The buffers were turned in brass and set in a mould to produce a quantity of castings suitable for both types of carriage. I haven't bothered with any form of compensation with these as they really are so small it hardly seems worth the effort. In fact they are that small one would fit neatly inside your average 10ton coal wagon (yes, I tried it)! The open-sided second required a little more work in that I made little turned pillars to support the roof which was made of brass sheet gently curved to the correct profile. These carriages also had brakes, the brakesman sitting amongst the passengers and hopefully not being too distracted from his job by the odd glimpse of a ladies ankle. The handle is operated through a hole in the end panelling which presumably gave the brakesman a view forward or back as required, although a roof top seat like the braked First class carriages would have been much more useful in that respect. The enclosed Night Second is a work in progress and artwork is currently being drawn up by a fellow Brighton Circle member to produce the two types of First class as etched kits. More about these in a future blog when I finally stop fussing over the detail and agree to send the artwork to the etchers!
    31 points
  17. Not realising that restoring the images to some of my blog entries would also shunt them to the front of the queue, I thought I'd best add something new to redress the balance. Having sat to one side for some time patiently waiting for me to get 'other stuff' out of the way, my William Bridges Adams light locomotive has been lifted out of the box and steered towards a state of completion. At least the locomotive is almost there notwithstanding a few finishing jobs. It still lacks the composite tender brake carriage to which it was close coupled and I have yet to even start this, but it has to be said, completing the loco is spurring me on to get it done. The original was built by Adams at his Fairfield Works in Bow in 1849 for the Londonderry & Enniskillen Railway in Ireland. a couple of others to this pattern were constructed but Adams went bust in 1850 so the design was picked up by Stephensons who proceeded to construct further examples with the addition of a footplate, larger cylinders, better valve gear and other improvements. I suppose you could say this model represents the design in its Mk 1 condition. The loco is built entirely from scratch, 4mm scale EM gauge. A tiny open frame motor (possibly from a Tenshodo motor bogie) sits in the well tank under the boiler and power is transferred back to the driving wheels using a couple of nylon spur gears from the odds box to a 38:1 Branchlines worm and pinion combo. Heaven only knows what the reduction ration is a I haven't bothered counting the teeth on the two spurs but it runs very sweetly at a realistic speed so that's good enough for me.
    30 points
  18. Now things have settled a bit on here I am going to add a few blogs. It has taken some time to get this painted and finished. A fair bit of messing about with transfers again, I do wish someone would do CR goods lining. All looks a bit rough close up, but passable from a distance I think. A couple of posed pics, the side on official portrait. At rest in the yard. They were a narrow engine, this view just how narrow. Being such an open cab I had a go at putting reasonable detail on the backhead. The 323 class were built for serious shunting work, so the question is can it actually shunt ? Runs pretty smoothly for a scratchbuild, should settle a bit with running in. With regard the the rest of the blog I will wait till that orange banner changes to “The server has replaced all the pics it can, the rest is up to you.“ I do have all the missing pics saved locally so I can fix whatever is still missing at that point.
    30 points
  19. Jonathan enjoys his job at Bricklayers Arms. Usually he is gainfully employed tending to the bovine guests arriving at the cattle yard. He couldn't say for sure what happens to them once they leave the yard, but given the profusion of tanneries in he area we can be fairly certain it is a one way trip. He makes their lives as comfortable as he can whilst they are in his charge. Occasionally there are sheep to manage but these are less rewarding owing to their irksome tendency to bolt. However, today does not look like it is going to be so enjoyable. He has been given the task of whitewashing the new cattle wagons arriving this morning, they are larger than the previous wagons. He thinks this is a direct result of two beasts jumping out on their journey through north Kent and being, as reported in the Illustrated London News, 'dashed to atoms' by a train passing in the opposite direction. The whitewash will no doubt end up on his clothes, his shoes, and on his hands and face. Jonathan is diligent but clumsy and we think he may need to move his tub much closer to the wagon! It was fun to build the SER cattle wagon with doors open for a change, something you don't often see. But perhaps I need to get out more...
    29 points
  20. As I mentioned in the last blog I have been building some CR ballast wagons. These were built using my usual methods, styrene bodies, copperclad sub chassis to take the W irons. The outer pair are from the 1890 drawing, the middle one is a pre-diagram version from the photo. The drawing makes no mention of canvass covers for the axleboxes and without a reference photo I can’t tell whether they were so fitted. I added them to the pre -diagram wagon which did have them. I suppose if a photo ever comes up I can add them to the other two. What is significant from my point of view is that they are painted with acrylic paints. A bit of a learning curve involved but I think I am reasonably convinced by the result. Comments welcome. A couple of snaps of a short pway train. The ballast plough is a kitbash, bits of the cambrian kit combined with new sides and ends. I have a few other projects which might be occupying the bench for a while. Might even generate a separate blog for one of them .
    28 points
  21. A split blog , but there are quite a few photos. The footplate made up. Looking at photos I think that as built they had Drummond buffers. Later they had the heavy duty ribbed buffers fitted. It may be that the second lot had them from the start, but I am going for the early version so Drummond buffers it is. Sitting here on the chassis, always a relief to find it is sitting slightly low. Sitting high can be a real pain. I’ll shim the compensation beam. Boiler barrel rolled and made up There are a couple of solid brass discs in there, turned to size. The firebox end one isn’t soldered, just tie wrapped. Then I chopped it up, using the lathe gently turned by hand. The cab was formed with parts cut out using templates made on the silhouette. The shortened boiler is soldered to the tank. Slight gap, but there will be a mounting flange to cover it. So far that is all straightforward. The simplest thing would be to have the motor vertical in the firebox. However I wanted to use that slightly longer motor and fit a flywheel. I cut the severed part of the boiler barrel longitudinally and fitted it to the footplate along with the firebox. The motor and flywheel comes up through the hole in the firebox floor and is constrained by a couple of foam pads and a spring steel clip located in two bits of brass tube. Needs a bit of refinement, but that is the idea. Viewed from the side the gap between the boiler barrel and footplate can't be seen. Second bit, room for a few more pics.
    28 points
  22. Visually speaking, work appears to have slowed up on my Rennie loco project. I have reached the stage where all the fiddly little detailing jobs need to be done and this takes time without much obvious progress. The current pair approaching completion are Satellite of the London & Brighton Railway, and Croydon of the London & Croydon Railway. However, the list is reducing as each detail is ticked off and at present I'm awaiting some etches for the reversers. This is unusual for me as I like to build absolutely everything from scratch but I will need at least four reversers of two different types and more in the future. So an opportunity was taken to squeeze some on to the fret for an 1849 SER composite carriage kindly drawn up for me by a fellow Brighton Circle member (more of which anon), so once this arrives I will be able to complete the build and prepare them for painting, as well as make a couple of the composite carriages which I'm quite excited about too. I took the opportunity to compare Croydon with Plumpton, a Stroudley single of the 1880s and my first proper scratch build completed many years ago (and looking a bit rough). The G class singles were not big engines but it's surprising how it almost towers over Croydon. The back-to-back image shows the difference very well. Bearing in mind that Croydon is in the foreground in the image below, it's still very small compared with the G class behind. The difference is size gives an impression of how locomotive technology and of course power increased dramatically over the ensuing 40 years. Stroudley's inside frame tender was twice the size! It would be fascinating to compare Croydon with a small tank engine like a Terrier or even a much larger 20th century locomotive. I suspect the pulling power of the finished model will be fairly small as well, hence my plan for etched coaches! Thanks for looking, more soon...!
    28 points
  23. I have been making slow but steady progress. When I started I knew that it would take most of the summer, so I’m happy just pottering on with it all, learning as I go along. A few details. This is the luggage rack assembly, with the mirrored compartment wall. The brackets were a very fancy design, I have simplified them as they are less than 4 mm long. Not difficult in itself, but I have 64 of them to make. Seating is provided in the kit but it is basic and needs a bit of extra work. These are the first class seats. The silhouette cut the armrests and the wings, both trimmed in lace. How many antimacassers? Well, 78 of them. An internal view. The D96 is a nine compartment third. This photo was taken in dark conditions, I wanted to see how the level of lighting looked in practice. As I have mentioned in the past painting and lining is not my strong point. I gave a couple of sides a coat of rattle can, then left them for a few days to really dry. It is “Vauxhall Burgundy Red”. Now experts would tell me that I should be using an airbrush to spray a more accurate shade but there are limitations to what I can do in a flat. I really wasn’t happy about the idea of painting all those panels. Hmm, so I decided to have a go at making lined transfers on white transfer paper. Design was not difficult, but repetitive. I had some “Crafty” brand paper, first print, awful. Ink smeared all over. Second print, worse. So I learned that transfer paper degrades over time. New white transfer paper ordered, “Mister decal paper” brand. Printed well, transfers made and applied to a paint test card. Not bad but I still felt that the white part had too much of a pink tinge from the coach purple underneath. The answer would be to paint the panel white before applying the transfer, but that was what I was trying to avoid. I sat and had a think, what if I just put an identical transfer over the first? I tried it and it worked perfectly, nice white panel with the line round it showing up well. So here is a D 94 composite side as a first example. I am quite pleased with that. I wouldn’t claim that it is as fine as that produced by an expert painter with considerable skill with a lining pen. However I am not one and this method looks the part from normal viewing distances. It is also very fault tolerant. Make a mistake cutting round the transfer, bin it, next one. Realise that a panel is a bit squint, drop of water, adjust it. Having got the techniques sorted out I can push on and do the rest, still a fair amount to do though.
    28 points
  24. Whilst waiting for the gearbox to arrive I thought I would have a go at the saddle tank. I cut the templates on the silhouette and glues them to 10 thou brass. The notched ones are 3 layers soldered together, with a single layer for the front face. The frame soldered up. Flat board with some stripwood and various clips to hold it all . Wrapper annealed, cleaned and formed with various tubes and rods. The wee vice with the red bits of plastic from lidl worked a treat for holding it all tight for soldering. Given a good scrub and handrail knobs soldered in. I’m quite pleased with that, not as difficult as I thought it might be to get it all the right shape and size. Gears and hornblocks have now arrived, so frames next.
    28 points
  25. Over the past month I decided to try and resurrect an ancient locomotive from my collection. It's not that we've discovered a source of high pressure Geo-thermal steam in Clare, it is just that I fancied trying to get the old Impetus Andrew Barclay fireless to work again. I first built this loco about 20 years ago and I can remember my son, who was about 5 at the time, drawing steam locomotives with their cylinders at the wrong end for months afterwards! The loco was built with a split axle design but still suffered from intermittent pickup. I had a little room left in the locomotive so I wondered about fitting a modern DCC decoder and stay-alive capacitor which might be better able to deal with this. I asked for some recommendations on the MERG forum and then opted to order a Zimo MX617f and KungFu stay-alive 27x9x6. I order these from Digitrains online at 13:30 on a Friday, Order acknowledgment was immediate, an email telling me that the goods had been dispatched arrived at 14:30 and the chips arrived in the post at 10:30 the following morning - Kudos to Digitrains and the Royal Mail. Soldering the stay-alive to the chip was nerve-racking but achievable (I believe that Digitrains will do it for you if asked) and the decoder inserted into the top of the reservoir (note: not boiler) . The chips were installed within 24 hours of being ordered! The stay-alive is sitting in the cab but is pretty well hidden. The result is incredible. Before the loco would stutter along and needed to be traveling at an over-scale speed in order not to stall. At this speed the motor was rev'ing very fast and generated an unpleasant whiny sound. After fitting the stay-alive I can now make the locomotive crawl along with its wheels going around at 1 r.p.m. It really does make for a most unusual model (and as such is bound to be released R-T-R before too long!) My second little project has been to work on some tests for a potential little side project. I rather fancy building a small single board 'cameo layout' for the fireless to run on. Many years ago I started a layout based on Mistley in Essex. The layout even got as far as a Scaleforum at City university (I said it was a long time ago) but was eventually abandoned because the maltings buildings were just so damn big and would have taken decades to make in plasticard. But now I have access to a laser cutter! One section of the building looks like this, the actual building being about 8 storeys tall and ten or so bays wide... My first attempt was to cut a test section using 3mm MDF for the base and 1mm MDF for the buttresses and detail. Each of these sections is 50mm wide x 70mm tall. While the buttresses were fine the detail on the brickwork was way too course. For my second attempt I purchased a sheet of oiled manilla card from Tindall's in Ely. (I corrected the closures around the windows etc. on this too) This gave a better look but the tiny pieces of card were extremely fragile to fit. The multiple layers needed were also very time consuming to add. For a last attempt I tried 3D printing just the decorative brick work. The part between the buttresses was printed as one piece and the part which wraps around the buttress was a separate piece. I also modeled the decorative diagonal brick course which had previously been cut in 1mm MDF and fitted into a slot in the 3mm MDF base. As I was in 3D printing mode I added some windows and grills to the print job. This was so much easier to assemble and could be made even easier if I cut some alignment holes in the base with the laser and added some location pins on the back of the 3D printed parts. I had a go at painting the test piece with two different colours of brick and then adding a mortar coat with some fine surface filler. Finally a wash with Vallejo grey wash. I think a building nearly 50cm x 25 cm could look rather impressive, particularly with a fireless and a couple of grain wagons shunting in front of it. I remember an enjoyable operating session on Enigma Engineering (what they make is a mystery) a few years back, this might be a case for Mistrey Quay (who knows what ships from there?) What do you reckon? David
    28 points
  26. Last year I embarked on an ambitious project to scratch build no less than four locomotives by Messrs Rennie of Blackfriars, London. In 1838/39 the brothers constructed five engines for the London & Southampton Rly., and two for the London & Croydon Rly. It is clear from studying the drawing published by Brees in his 'Railway Practice' that the design was a combination of Stephenson's Patentee and the popular and sturdy 2-2-2 by Sharp & Co of Manchester. However, having no previous experience in the field, the minute books at Kew tell us that all seven engines were miserable performers constantly requiring attention to keep them in service. Two further examples of this type were built for the London & Brighton and two more were built and exported to Germany. Despite a growing reputation for shoddy workmanship, in 1841 Daniel Gooch commissioned Rennies to build two engines of the Fire Fly class for the broad gauge GWR. Gooch supplied patterns and templates to ensure the engines were built exactly as he intended and since the Fire Fly's were a modification of Stephenson's superb Star Class, these two engines named Mazeppa and Arab were excellent. At the time they entered traffic they were the most powerful of their class having slightly larger cylinders than their stablemates. The result of this order was that Messrs Rennie now had experience of building a 'proper' locomotive and based on this they then built three further engines, Satellite in late 1841 for the London & Brighton Rly, and Man of Kent and Kentish Man for the Joint Committee of the L&CR and the SER in 1842/43. Contemporary reports tell us that all three were a roaring success. As a representation of Rennie's locomotives I chose to model Croydon, Satellite and Kentish Man (the fourth being a duplicate Satellite in 00 for a friend). To save making frame sides again and again I decided to make one master for each side of the sandwich frame, set them in a mould and cast them, then assemble each side frame as a proper sandwich. This saved a lot of time especially with duplicating Satellite. The buffer beams are universal so they were also made as castings as were a number of other parts required in number. The tender was also made in this way and treated as a 'kit', after all I need four of them. The idea is that a simple motor bogie unit will go in each tender and this universal power unit will be easily produced for each loco. Croydon is taking shape. I made masters for the boiler, firebox and smokebox for all the locos and cast them from resin to reduce weight. Having moulds for each of these units makes them interchangeable and potentially useful for future projects too. Creating Croydon's distinctive octagonal dome was fun...! Satellite is just balanced in its wheels for this trial fitting. This one is in 00 so quite a bit of material had to be shaved out of the boiler, firebox and smokebox in order to fit the wheels in what is realistically the wrong place! The splashers will remain polished brass and should look quite grand in the end.
    28 points
  27. It has often been said that the camera is the harshest critic. I tend to agree with that so I thought I would post a couple of photos of completed sides to see how they look in the context of the layout before going ahead with the other two. So, here we are. Diagram 96 all third, compartment side. Diagram 94 composite, corridor side. Those look reasonable to me, apart from the dust. Getting there.
    26 points
  28. It has taken me longer to build these than it took St Rollox. So, a few pictures and a bit of video of the rake in service. A bit of video, they move quite well. All things considered I have found this to be an interesting build. There have been challenges which meant that I had to develop techniques to overcome what I know to be my modelling weaknesses. I use the phrase “messing about on the bench” quite a lot but that is the part of modelmaking that I really enjoy.
    26 points
  29. Following a great little video recently produced by Anthony Dawson about the locomotive Jenny Lind of the London, Brighton & South Coast Railway, I felt inspired to give my own 4mm scale model a little break from the monotony of the display cabinet. The original locomotive was the first of a batch designed by David Joy and built by E.B.Wilson of Leeds. Delivered in 1847, it was a very successful class of locomotives which owed much to the design of John Gray who had been Locomotive Superintendent of the LB&SCR. His express engine bears a strong resemblance to Joy's creation but his were built by Hackworth's and construction was so painfully slow that they were still being delivered after the better Jenny Lind class were entering service. I built it many ago from a set of castings loosely resembling a kit. Not an easy build and I ended up motorising the tender using a small transverse motor from an old defunct Apple computer. It works ok but isn't a very helpful example for others to follow and certainly not the sort of thing that's ideal to include in the 'kit'! At some point I should perhaps add some crew but for the purposes of explaining these photos, they have clearly gone off to the pub for swift porter before anyone notices they've gone... Note the similarity between Gray's design and the subsequent Jenny Lind's in the drawing below. The odd looking box in front of the driving wheel is the boiler feed pump. A much better drawing of Gray's engine exists but I am waiting for my copy to arrive soon so this one will have to do for now. Plans are afoot to model this one too. I hope the inclusion of the video link is within RMWeb rules, if not please accept my apologies and delete it. I had no part in the making of the video but I have to say the live steam model (not mine) in the video is really something special. I hope you enjoy it.
    25 points
  30. Well it's been a long time coming, but I've finally completed building another coach! I finished the V9 back in November, so this one's construction has hardly been at a lightning pace The build follows more or less exactly the same methods as the V9, but with the added faff of having to detail the interior of the compartments. I used seat mouldings from Slater's Plastikard and plan to add some scratch built picture frames and mirrors along with a few Edwardian passengers, once the painting has been completed Kit components 1 Kit components 2 I'm not sure how old the kit is, the brass was pretty heavily oxidised, but it all cleaned up without any problems using a fiberglass scratch brush. Assembled Coach 1 Assembled Coach 2 A bit of fiddling was needed to get the ride height of the two coaches the same, but nothing a bit of judicious filling of the subframes containing the wheel sets wouldn't sort out! Dia.V9 Passenger Brake Van and Dia. U9 Composite Now that they are built I'm pleased with them and once painted they should look the part when combined with a couple of bogie clerestories. I'll ty and get the painting done over the next month or so, but life has a way of adding distractions to modelling plans! Until next time Best wishes Dave
    25 points
  31. A general view of the layout as it is today... 'cardboard city' - some buildings sketched in to build up the picture A good deal of time through the year has been taken up with upgrading the stock - most was put together in the late 1980s and much in need of refurbishment. The Toad has been overhauled with new chimney, new rainstrips, new footboards and handrails: I hope it's now correct for a 1927, 6 wheeled brake. The Siphon G was scratchbuilt in about '87, all wood construction but now needs some better brake equipment. The Opens and GW vans have been improved and should now be correct for date and type: the "GW"s are transfers and the lettering is hand done - I haven't quite got that yet but it's improving with practice. There's been a lot of work on the electrical side - all the points and signals are working (servos with Megapoints controllers) with interlocking between points and signals (a good many relays). Signal building is about 75% complete with the last of the semaphores in progress. Ground signals are yet to be started. Most of the point rodding is complete and signal wires are about to be installed. There are a few new items of stock - the Slater's twin tank milk wagon (a little anachronistic, arriving in 1927 Swan Hill a few years too soon): there is a match truck and a rectangular tank wagon tucked in the siding, running but not yet painted and lettered. In a few months time, when some of the buildings are installed, I'll start on some coaching stock.... but that's for 2022. Swan Hill is the first layout I've worked on - I built some test trackwork in the 1980s, enough to decide that O gauge standards (at the time) didn't seem to work very well and so, after a bit of calculation and close observation, I test built some pointwork to 31,5mm gauge and amended other dimensions to suit. I built most of the stock in the later 1980s, the pannier from a Vulcan kit and then scratchbuilt the Dean Goods. I see from my shelves that I have copies of MRJ from the first issue, numbered 0, through to about 25 and then a long gap until issues dated 2018 and later: that reflects the story so far... first experiments with 7mm scale models coinciding with MRJ issue 0, a long gap when nothing happened and then beginning Swan Hill in 2018. I thought I might be finshed by 2027 and, for that reason, decided on 1927 as the nominal date line for the layout. With progress as it is, that looks a bit doubtful....ah well, we'll see what turns out during the coming year which I will try to document as I go along. Thanks for looking in during the year and best wishes for 2022.
    25 points
  32. Work continues at pace since the last blog, mostly taking advantage of the good weather to carry on with the body work before the winter comes and its difficult to do anything externally in the wind and rain. All of the major welding has now been completed, we can see the cant rail area has had new steel put in place, the entire lower half of no 2 end has now been ground back and filled and a base primer applied (several more coats of primer are due yet. Extensive corrosion was found above the door, and this has also been cut out, this has all since been re-plated, the engine room door will be "modified" to prevent a re-occurrence of this , as water tends to run down the bodyside and pool on the top of the door. B Side radiator frame, corrosion had comepletely pulled the skill away from the frame causing a large ripple, this two has now been completely replated. The window frame steel itself in the door was found to be de-laminating which would have meant it would have been impossible to re-seal the window, this too has now been repaired More views of repaired steelwork below the vents for the boiler room control resistors And here you can see the aluminium strip applied to seal the bodywork against the weather, the reason for using aluminium is the cant rail grills and surrounding structure is aluminium, and replacing with steel would corrode the aluminium quite quickly, the aluminium is riveted with over 400 rivets, and also sealed with a NON setting sealant, which will keep the whole thing water tight, this is where the water ingress started which caused all of the corrosion seen in one of my previous blogs, a profiled finishing strip will hide the join between the aluminium and the steel, and the rivet heads will be ground flush and filled. Its very easy to fix corrosion, but its better to stop it happening again The bodyside windows have now started to be re-installed, however a shortage of the correct profile seal has stalled this, a lot of people dont realise its the simple things that can trip you up, originally this seal was £3.10 a meter and readily availiable, the distributor decided it was obsolete 5 years ago (despite it being one of the most common rail profiles) and now charges £15.45 a meter with a minimum run of 120m! One of the perils of putting a bit too much pressure on the glass when re-installing it :) The hole at the front has also had new steel applied. Elsewhere work has returned to the roof, where the grills have al l been cleaned out unblocked, and had new threads to retain the grills installed The fibreglass domes have also been sanded back and any damage to the gel coat repaired, more work is required on top though. A view of the locomotive roof with the engine room cover removed. Work has also been taking place above the radiators, the, holes that retain the fibreglass covers drilled and re-tapped to a metric size, you can see BCRW were not to good when it came to drilling straight holes! The fibreglass covers being repaired and re-painted, they will have there holes re-drilled, this is an undercoat they will be rubbed again down and have top coat applied later. Another major area of work is the fibreglass roof cover itself, which after 60 years is in a pretty poor state it was split, had many botched repairs and was falling apart. Re-enforcement of a corner of the section that had snapped completely Some examples of damage to the roof, from big holes to splits and a complete section that was snapped off A new aluminium section being trial fitted, also many "friday afternoon" repairs are evident as is splitting and cracking in the frame. The roof had split 3 of its 4 bearers, as the roof was originally created in a mould you cant replace these very easily and retain any strength, as a result strengthening plates have been fitted and riveted with special fibreglass rivets over the crack. The newly formed aluminium section awaiting and riveting into place A corner was also missing after a hard life this was also repaired The roof had cracked entirely across this section (due to the missing section that was repaired with aluminium) now that its back in place a patch and be applied with out the roof re-fracturing. FInally a complete new top skin was applied after the old one has been "peeled" off as can be seen one of the lifting lugs is missing, this one done by a passing tree when 043 has been on lorry on its many travels... A new lug made and awaits sealing.
    25 points
  33. All this replacement of lost images on previous blogs has made me think about gathering some favourite images from my layout project and dumping them in one blog entry, so here it is. A hotch-potch of photos from around the first baseboard which is almost complete. The layout is 4mm scale and track work EM gauge. I initially set it in 1844 when Bricklayers Arms was completed and opened to the public. However, it has now turned into 1845 as this allows for a little weathering and I don't have to leave everything looking too new. Apologies to those who have seen it all before but I thought a summary was due before moving on to the next baseboard which will be the massive goods shed and lots of wagon turntables, (I'm not sure I'm looking forward to that bit)! Thanks for looking. The backs of the houses at Greyhound Place The stables at the back of the cattle yard. The Rat catcher. The Tannery. A dispute over the chaff-cutting. Preparing to lime wash a new cattle wagon. Delivery of a prize bull. Mr Rolls is late for work.
    24 points
  34. Just a short blog, with the site being slow atm. I have made and added some detail, all made up from various bits of brass and wire. The smokebox door is technically a GWR one, but it is the right size and shape. If you don’t tell Mr Drummond then I won’t. A couple of pics all fastened together and wired up. Runs pretty smoothly so I think it is time for a spot of primer.
    24 points
  35. Fun Town - Ice Cream Wagon. Had this crazy idea about building a few animated wagon's that would run on DCC for Fun Town's market. The original thought's were to add movement to the 4mm scale humanoids that would occupy these stationary wagons, maybe a rotating head, guy serving ice cream, someone waving, rotating cog's / gears, steam cylinder's, and roof fan's. The animated wagon's would be similar in size to the market stall wagon's and form part of the same train. With very little pre planning, I jumped straight in and made three very similar chassis with a common mechanism for the steam cylinder's and then later decided to concentrate on one wagon to see what animations were achievable in such a small space. This blog covers the construction of the first wagon and although I'm quite pleased with the end result, I'm a little disappointed that no animated humanoids were made in this first attempt, however, I do now have a few idea's to try out on the next wagon. Thanks for Looking..
    24 points
  36. Although somewhat irrelevant to my overall project south of Old Father Thames, I confess I've always rather fancied the look of these sturdy GER open wagons. So it's been a pleasure to revive these two ex-Woodham Wagon Works kits of both 1870 and 1883 versions. I managed to complete the 1870 one which is my personal preference but then struggled to find a period photo of the 1883 edition which is why it is as yet unlettered or numbered. I also fouled up a bit with this one by setting the solebars too far apart and causing all sorts of difficulties fitting the springs, doh! I think this is one for the 'You get the general idea anyway' shelf! It was only when I came to photograph them I realised (when they fell between the rails) that I'd fitted them with 00 wheels...what is wrong with me?! Note to self: do try to pay more attention in future! The 1870 version. The 1870 version...again! The 1883 version (work in progress).
    24 points
  37. I've not made an etched kit for a long time, so what better excuse to dust off the RSU than to put together one of Stephen Harris' kit for the 13T All Steel High. http://www.2mm.org.uk/small_suppliers/stephenharris/index.htm The etched contains everything except; vacuum cylinder, wheel sets, axle boxes and buffers. An interesting process is making the chain link dimples in the side of some wagon diagrams. This involves a 1mm punch and a sandwich of etched jigs, very well though out. Transfers are from fox and the base paint was Tamiya acrylics. This was then sealed in with matt varnish. The weather was built up in layers using various paints and the majority is done with brush work.
    24 points
  38. Thankfully, in my case at least, lack of blog updates has not meant lack of activity. The past few months has seen slow but steady progress towards completing the cattle yard at Bricklayers Arms c1845 and therefore entering the final straight in terms of completing the first baseboard of this four baseboard exhibition layout. The following pictures are a collection of various cameos and scenes which hopefully go some way to telling the story of a busy (ish) mid 19th century yard in 4mm scale. The first scene shows a couple of chaps having some difficulty with a new chaff cutter. Chaff, or chopped hay/straw was an essential part of a horses diet. This particular model was Ward & Colbourne's Patent Chaff Cutting Engine, new in 1844. I scratch built it using brass scraps, following a drawing on the cover of Mechanics Magazine August 4th 1844. It's unusual in that it is a guillotine cutter and probably quite dangerous too! I modelled it so that it works. As you turn the handle the tiny crank turns and the blade goes up and down. Utterly pointless I know but fun all the same. The figures are modified ModelU 3D prints. I've fettled the clothing and hats a bit to take them back to mid-19th century labourers. Farmer Thompson is pleased to finally arrive at the cattle yard having driven his prize bull all the way from his farm just south of Peckham Rye. He got a good price for it so once it's on its way to Kent he'll reward himself with a pint in the Greyhound before heading back. The bull started life as a large white metal cow from the Dart Castings range. I cut the udders off, added some 'cahunas' and horns and beefed it up a bit with some judicious soldering before filing to shape. The characters are more modified ModelU figures. Of course a cattle yard would not be complete without a cattle wagon. This one is from my own range of kits, an early open South Eastern Railway type. Strictly speaking it's about 5-6 years too modern for the period I'm modelling but it's as near as I can get to an authentic vehicle. The characters hand-shunting are in fact me. I was lucky enough to be scanned by Alan Buttler from ModelU at the Severn Valley Railway a few weeks ago. He's done a fabulous job tidying up the scans and printing these out, and for once I haven't felt the need to modify them! It amazes me that even details such as individual fingers are reproduced. The only concern is the the painting does them justice, especially in 4mm scale. At the end of a busy day, Abraham is exhausted. He's diligently swept and shovelled to keep the cattle docks clean and is ready to go home to tea.
    23 points
  39. This cottage in Parkend is, I believe, known these days as 'The Nook'. Certainly this is the name given to it by John Stretton in 'The Dean Forest Railway, a Past & Present Companion', Volume 2 (Silver Link Publishing). This cottage, plus the house to it's left (the former Police House and Police Station for Parkend and currently known as 'Hazledene') are very close to the end of the Marsh branch at Parkend, which is the subject of Re6/6's current P4 project - However, for the purposes of this blog and all subsequent entries, I will be referring to it as 'The Other House'. Both cottages are required for John's layout, although the Police House will need to be cut down slightly, to fit with the backscene and the rear edge of the layout. I agreed to build both cottages for John and am hoping to get them finished in time for the 'mini-Scaleforum local show for local people' type event that is taking place at our Area Group's (aka 'D.R.A.G.') normal venue near Teignmouth on the Saturday of what would have been the Scaleforum weekend (25th September coming). There aren't a whole lot of published photos of either cottage, although the Police House does admittedly feature in rather more photos than 'The Other House'. We know that the Police House had a rendered cement-coloured finish for much of it's life (and certainly during the period that the layout is set in). Apart from modern Google-type photos of The Other House, there is hardly anything published. What would have been a good view in the above John Stretton book, taken in the 1960s, is mostly hidden by a rather inconsiderate pannier tank. As such, the best we can do is to decide that The Other House was built of local stone, in a style that more or less matches other stone dwellings further up the Marsh branch, opposite The Fountain Inn, including the famous 'half house' that does feature in a number of contemporary photos. I was then given a free hand to decide on the exact materials to use and the colour scheme. Being a fan of the Scalescenes range of downloadable printed brick papers and building kits, I decided to use their 'TX48' sheet 'Squared Rubble' for The Other House - https://scalescenes.com/product/tx48-squared-rubble/ The first thing was to produce a scale drawing to 4mm scale. As this was started when pandemic restrictions were still in place, the dimensions had to be estimated from what photographic evidence was to hand. A drawing was produced and a few copies taken. One of the copies was used to cut out the main wall elevations and lightly tape to a piece of Dalerboard (stout card, coloured on one side and 1.5mm thick): A 4mm 'plinth' was left, so that the building could be slightly sunk into the ground. The outline of the elevations and the window and door apertures were then carefully drawn around with a sharp pencil: The five wall sections (including the end wall of the 'lean to' were then cut out. At this point, I forgot to take any photos for a while. I had the stone paper printed off by a local printer on his fancy laser jet, not trusting my aged ink jet to produce the kind of quality I was looking for. The stone paper was then cut approximately to size and glued to the respective Dalerboard components and the resulting wall sections placed together for a photo: The stone paper is overlapping at the corners and would be carefully trimmed back and coloured with a soft pencil, once the wall sections were glued together. Next was to fit windows and doors. We had planned to use York Modelmaking products, but we couldn't find anything that matched the necessary window and door dimensions, so I made up window frames and sash units in the same way that I have for the Callow Lane cottages, namely individual strips of painted plasticard, which are glued in place behind the window openings and individual sash sections, with the glazing bars applied using a Bob Moore lining pen and enamel paints. Some flat sections of plastic strip were primed and sprayed with a dark green: A front door and also a side door to the 'lean to' were made up from plasticard: In reality, the 'lean to' of 'The Nook' these days appears to function as a garage, with an entrance slightly lower than the front door, but for the sake of a quiet life, I have kept everything on the same level and assumed that in the 1950s and 1960s, the 'lean to' was simply a store of some kind. Window frames and front door in place: Sash window sections being prepared: Windows and doors now glued in place. Front wall is still not attached to the rest of the building at this time, to aid fitting the windows and doors: Now it's all glued together: Next, a 'false roof' was glued between the various wall sections. At 1.5mm thick, Dalerboard is really too thick to stand proud of the walls: Top roof sections were then cut out of much thinner card ('postcard' thickness) and parallel lines drawn on, 5mm apart: Scalescenes individual slate strips (from one of their terraced cottages kits, which I already had) were cut out, the edges coloured with a grey felt tip pen and glued in place, using Prittstick, one at a time. When each roof section had all it's slate strips in place, they were placed between two sheets of clean paper and left overnight under a pile of heavy Ian Allen railway photo albums (other publishers will also do): The finished roof sections are then turned upside down and the slate strips trimmed very carefully along the edges, using a very sharp scalpel and are then glued to the 'false roof' sections using Evostick Impact adhesive: Guttering was made up from Wills half down pipes (finer section than their actual guttering) and spigots of 0.5mm brass rod epoxied in place. Also chimney pots were made up from Wills components and left overnight to harden off: Down pipes were then made up from 0.8mm brass rod, with fuse wire wrapped around in a couple of places and soldered on. This and the guttering was sprayed the same green and holes drilled in the Dalerboard to match the spacing of the respective spigots and the whole lot then epoxied in place: At this stage, I popped over to John's and posed the cottage in it's planned location on the layout: John then posed some of the resin walling that he's going to use, in front of the cottage: I then took the cottage back home to finish the roof flashing. The building then had the windows and the front door blanked off and the whole thing was given a light waft-over with Humbrol Matt Acrylic varnish, to take the printer's sheen off the stone paper. I then posed the building for some arty shots in the garden: It's just about done now, a little light weathering with some powders will be done in due course, particularly around the chimneys, but it's now time to think about making a start on the Police House.
    23 points
  40. Last year I needed some styrene sections and as it happened the only place with stock was Hattons. Oh well. Anyway having ordered the stuff I needed I had a look at the pre-owned stuff. Just for fun, honest. Anyway I saw a Hornby generic 4 wheel NBR brake which had been dropped. The end was well bashed, buffers and couplings broken, the whole thing bent, body off. But all the bits had been put in the box and it was a tenner. Add to basket. But why ? A lot has been said about these coaches but I didn’t want to comment until I had a chance to break one myself. Having someone else break it for me and then selling it to me for less than a third of full price seemed a good idea. So it arrived, I had a look at it, harumpfed a bit, put the bits back in the box and left it to fester. During the last month I have made some wagons. They are at the painting stage and I want them in a bit of a faded red lead colour. My usual method for this is humbrol 100 with a spot of 61 flesh mixed in to fade it pinkish. I opened a tin of 100, it was a solid colour. Um nope, it was just solid. So I opened my last new tin. Sludge, completely useless. This resulted in me going through all my enamels. Out of 80 tins I threw 40 away as unusable. Of course they were all the most recent and most useful ones, some tins dating back to the 1970s were perfectly ok, if i ever go back to making kits of ww2 aircraft. Now much has been said on rmweb about the decline of enamels and the subsequent withdrawal of many. So bite the bullet time, I shall have to learn how to paint with acrylics. Clearly this is two pronged experiment. Mess about with a generic coach and learn a bit about acrylics. So how did it turn out ? Perhaps I should have taken some progress pics, but I guess you will have seen similar. Anyway, chop a couple of panels out, shorten floor, weight and chassis to suit. Make proper footboards, add sprung buffers, safety chains, oil lamps, end steps, handrails, sensible door handles, lamp brackets, adjust brakes, reduce wheel flanges and adjust to my EM, chop off the huge coupling pockets and fit mag ajs and a CR number plate. I think I can justify this under rule 2, vaguely plausible. The Caley inherited all sorts from absorbed railways. So this is a bit of stock from perhaps the Scottish central now being used as a tool /riding brake by the pw department. Any other nebulous excuses gladly accepted….
    22 points
  41. Merry Christmas to one and all! Here’s hoping everyone has a festive time and 2022 is less of a problem than 2021! Happy modelling BW Dave
    22 points
  42. It’s some time since I modelled horse drawn vehicles but recent discussion on @Mikkel's blog raised my interest in the subject again. In Janet Russell’s book: ‘Great Western Horse Power’, there is a photograph of the Britzka carriage in which Brunel travelled while surveying the route of his planned Great Western Railway. This vehicle caught my imagination and the first question it raised was: “what on earth was a Britzka?”. The question led me to research many long-forgotten terms from a lost world of local craftsmanship. According to ‘The Carriage Foundation’ : “A britzschka has the same configuration as a barouche – but whereas a barouche has a canoe-shaped body, the body of a britzschka has a straight, or nearly straight, bottom line and the end panels are either concave or ogee shaped. The earliest britzschkas were suspended on C springs, and under springs were added soon after they were introduced.” This technical description did not help much, as Brunel clearly had other ideas in most of his design details! A more useful description, given in terms of its function, is currently on 'Wikipedia': “It was constructed as to give space for reclining at night when used on a journey. Its size made it suitable for use as a 19th-century equivalent to a motorhome, as it could be adapted with all manner of conveniences (beds, dressing tables etc.) for the traveller.” In other words, it served Brunel as a kind of ‘Dormobile’, which must have been very useful to him, since his chosen route for the railway ran through the sparsely populated Vale of the White Horse. I wonder if he ever regretted not following the route of the Great West Road to Bath, with its plentiful coaching inns! Unfortunately, Brunel’s carriage has not survived, although it can be seen in the background of a photograph of the Swindon carriage shop, 1872, shown in Alan Peck’s book: ‘The Great Western at Swindon Works’. It is thought to have been scrapped during the cull of ‘old relics’, including the original ‘North Star’ and ‘Lord of the Isles’, in 1906. Background Road carriages or ‘chariots’, as they were often called, were not popular in earlier years, when the few people who needed to travel preferred to do so on horseback, in view of the general state of the roads. The first carriage designs were similar to farm carts, with an unsprung undercarriage over which the body of the carriage was suspended by a combination of springs and leather straps. I found copious information on choosing and maintaining a carriage, including the costs of the various parts, in a 2-volume work: “A Treatise on Carriages” by Felton, published in 1798. The explanation of the various parts introduced me to a whole new vocabulary of craftsmen’s terms! The bar linking the front and rear axles was called the ‘perch’. - possibly related to the unit of length, which I learned at school : rod, pole, or perch = 5½ yards, although these carriages are shorter than that. The fore-carriage, which provided the capability for the front axle to turn the carriage, introduced a great selection of terms – ‘splinter bar’ at the front, to which the harnesses of the horses are attached, ‘nunters’ are short strengthening pieces of timber, ‘futchells’ are timbers that link the ‘splinter bar’ at the front to the ‘sway bar’ behind the axle. Many of these parts can be identified in the photo of the fore-carriage of Brunel’s Britzka: Fore-Carriage of Brunel’s Britzka A major difference in Brunel's carriage is the absence of a ‘perch’ running the length of the carriage. In Brunel’s version, this longitudinal component terminates in a finial at the back of the fore-carriage, while the rear axle carries the carriage body by means of a pair of three-quarter elliptic springs. These modifications allowed the floor of Brunel’s carriage to be lowered between the axles. The introduction of turnpike roads and a general improvement in surface maintenance led to very rapid advances in carriage designs during the early part of the 19th century. A major change was the introduction of full-elliptic springs between the axles and the main parts of the fore-carriage. Structural improvements included increasing the use of iron, initially to reinforce wooden parts and later to replace them in many roles. These new methods of construction included the introduction of the ‘fifth wheel’ – a horizontal wheel, which provided a bearing surface to provide much better control of the steering of the front axle. A Britzka carriage built in 1829 by Adams & Co of London and now in the Shugborough Estate, owned by the National Trust, shows these improvements very clearly: Fore-carriage of the Shugborough Britzka (1829) There is a delightful video, extolling the virtues of the Britzka while deploring the depredations of the newfangled railways, on YouTube . My Model After a long period of research, it was time to consider a model. The complexity of the undergear cannot be represented fully in 4mm scale, so compromises had to be made but I feel it is important to know what is being simplified. I only had the side-on photograph to work from, so many of the dimensions and details are informed guesses, on my part. The Carriage Body I followed my usual method of extruding a 3D ‘body from a ‘canvas’, using ‘Fusion 360’ software. For a reference dimension, I set the diameter of a hind wheel at 4 feet – see footnote. Extruding my Model Carriage Body At first, I only extruded half the final width of the carriage. I then added the door and other detailing onto the side before creating a mirror image, to complete the width of the carriage, with the opposite side automatically detailed. I made the front boot as a separate extrusion to fit against the curved leading edge of the body. Similarly, I extruded the box seat for the coachman from the same ‘canvas’. I created each of these parts as a separate ‘body’, so that they could be printed individually in the optimum orientation. The Wheels, Once again, I extruded these directly from the ‘canvas’ but I only extruded one spoke and then used the ‘Circular Pattern’ command to create the correct number of spokes for each wheel, in a regular pattern around the hub. 3D-Printed Wheels on Printer Bed The complete set of wheels took just 4 minutes to print. I also made a spare set of wheels, to replace the very skinny and weak set on my ‘Scale Link’ Horse Bus. Fore-Carriage I felt sure that this part was going to be difficult and spent some time planning my way forward. In order to prepare a plan-view drawing of the fore-carriage, I took a screen-shot of the 3D model of the carriage body and used this to prepare outline sketches in Photoshop. I designed the fore-carriage in two parts – the lower swivelling carriage, carrying springs and wheels, while the upper fixed part is attached to the carriage body. A central pin allows the lower part to rotate about a vertical axis. Sketch Plan of Fore-Carriage I imported the above sketch as a ‘canvas’ into ‘Fusion 360’ and used my usual extrusion method to create the upper and lower fore-carriage parts as two separate ‘bodies’, ready to place in the correct alignment with the Carriage body. My 3D Model Fore-Carriage For a 4mm scale model, I decided not to attempt to replicate all the complex curves in the prototype but used simple rectangular transoms and other parts. I made an exception for the ‘horn bar’, since the curvature is the reason for its name. Springs and Axles I created these as a series of separate components, extruded with reference to the original ‘canvas’ shown above and then manoeuvred into their correct places within the ‘Fusion 360’ model. The 3D-printed axle trees are a pair of hollow tubes to hold each pair of wheels at the correct distance apart. The wheel bearings will be provided by 1 mm diameter metal rods, passing through the wheel hubs, The front springs are full-elliptic and were drawn using the ‘3-point arc’ tool, then extruded. They fit between the front axle and the main transom. The hind springs are three-quarter elliptic, with one end attached to the side of the carriage and the other to a block carried on a bracket attached to the rear of the carriage. A bar links the brackets on the two sides. These parts were drawn with reference to the original ‘canvas’ and then extruded. Fore-carriage brackets On the prototype, the fore carriage was attached to the underside of the front boot by means of an array of iron tubes. I considered using metal wires for my model but then, after making a few modifications, decided to create these supports as an integral part of the 3D-printed fore-carriage. I extruded a support bar across the width of the underside of the front boot and then made two curved bars between the horn bar and this new bar. I extruded another straight bar from the ‘perch’ at the back of the fore-carriage up to the same support bar. For the diagonal struts, I used the ‘Sweep’ tool in 'Fusion 360' to extrude from a circular pattern, drawn on the top of the horn bar, then following a diagonal path to the support bar below the boot. For drawing the path, I enabled the ‘3D Sketch’ capability of ‘Fusion 360’ (in the Sketch Palette), which can be rather confusing when viewed on a flat computer screen. I found it best to draw the path approximately first and then make small ‘Move’ adjustments to the end points, while viewing from a couple of orthogonal directions. My 3D Model of the Front Frame with Struts General Assembly As I have mentioned several times, I have kept many of the parts as separate ‘bodies’ so that they can be printed individually, in the optimum orientation for each component. To ensure that all the parts will fit closely, I have moved them together within 'Fusion 360'. The result of this ‘general assembly’ is shown below: General Assembly of my Model in Fusion 360 3D-Printing The real work when making a 3D-printed model lies in the research, followed by the design of the model within the chosen Computer Aided Design software. In my own case, I have been reading about horse-drawn carriage design since the beginning of this year. Apart from the ‘Treatise on Carriages’ mentioned above, I also learned a lot from a ‘A History of Coaches’ by G.A.Thrupp, 1877, and ‘The Development of Center-Pivoted Fore-Carriages’ bv Dr. Gordon S. Cantle in The Carriage Journal: Vol 26 No 1, Summer 1988. See also 'Carriages and Coaches' by Ralph Straus, 1912. Since I only had a single photograph of Brunel’s Britzka, I spent a considerable amount of time deciding what details were appropriate for a carriage that was presumably built around 1830. I then had to break my overall design down into parts that could be printed on my 'Geeetech' E180 FDM printer, with minimal need for additional support structures. After going through this lengthy period of research and design, the actual printing was simply a matter of loading the files onto a memory card, inserting the card into the printer, and pressing the start button! For the record, the print times (estimated by the ‘Cura’ slicing software) were: Carriage Body: 29 minutes Front Boot: 8 minutes Box Seat: 7 minutes Fore-carriage: (2 parts, printed together): 5 minutes Wheels: (4, printed together): 4 minutes Springs: (5 parts, printed together): 5 minutes Once all the parts had been printed, I took the ‘group photo’ shown below: My Britzka Model Components, as printed. I am especially pleased with the appearance of the fore-carriage, which I had anticipated might have proved too delicate to print in 4 mm scale: My 3D-Printed Fore-carriage (2 parts) I shall pause for breath here. There’s a fair amount of fettling and fitting together of the various parts, then the painting and the addition of details such as carriage lamps. I plan to cover these in a future post Footnote: since my initial estimate, I have realised that the photo shows the carriage straddling some broad gauge track. Scaling from this track yields a hind wheel diameter of 4' 2" - close to my original estimate. Mike
    22 points
  43. One of the models that's survived with me down through numerous upheavals and house moves is this Hornby Battle of Britain class "Spitfire". It was a Christmas present in 1981 so will soon have been in my possession for forty years. The model was much anticipated as the original Triang-Hornby Spamcan had been out of the catalogue for some years and I had high hopes that Hornby would have used the gap to improve the product a bit. After all, this was the time when Airfix, Bachmann and even Lima were putting out models that, at least in looks and finish, were a huge step above what had been available before. Hornby had started to meet the competition with models like the Schools and Fowler 4MT that, for their time, were nice products. However, when the Spamcan reappeared not much had been done to it! I think there were shiny wheels, possibly a keeper plate with some incorrect brake blocks, and that was that. However, I did like mine and thought it looked good with a bit of weathering. I added rear cab sheets out of plastic card, filled in the sand box holes, and added front steps and some extra weight in the body. Forty years on, and although I was still fond of the model, it had to be said that with its solid plastic deflectors and lack of brake gear, it couldn't stand muster next to one of the modern Hornby Spamcans from the early 2000s. I didn't fancy building a new chassis as I felt that we could rapidly get into Trigger's Broom territory! More importantly, and allowing for it being powered by an X04 motor, it still ran fine. So what to do? Ebay came to the rescue with the purchase of a vintage Crownline detailing kit intended for this very model! I'd been aware of such kits when I was younger but they were well out of range of my pocket money, not to mention skills! Before tackling the body I thought I'd work on the chassis. There was no point doing anything else if this bit couldn't be made to work properly. On with the brake gear! This already makes a huge difference in my opinion. The gear is a flimsy etch which needs to be glued to the Mazak chassis block. For added peace of mind with regards to short circuits, I first glued very thin acetate to the chassis block, then glued the etches onto that - the idea being that each half of brake gear is totally isolated from both the wheels and the chassis. The kit also includes proper slide bars, to replace the dummy plastic ones on the original model, as well as parts to adapt the piston rods into proper ones that fit into the slide bars. Next I tacked the main work on the body. This involves some major surgery to the front end, but it's nothing too difficult. The solid deflectors are removed, blanking pieces are fitted in to replace the gap in the casing, and then nice etched deflectors can be fitted over the top. Along the way, the front of the loco, with the smokebox door, is also replaced by a new casting of the right width. Throughout the process I tried to limit damage to the original moulding and paint job, as I felt I would save myself a lot of work if the basic Hornby finish could be preserved. For old time's sake I wanted to keep the name Spitfire. The kit also includes replacement buffer beam and buffers, new castings for the ash-pan and bogie, and some etches to improve the look of various details on the body. With the major work done, I indulged in some test-running. The loco was hooked up the fairly taxing "Pines Express", which is seven Bachmann mark 1 coaches which are somewhat on the heavy and draggy side. Other than some initial slipping, the Battle of Britain was well up to the task. Once run in, though, I imagine it will rarely be asked to pull such a heavy train. More work followed with the addition of some of the more fragile parts, such as front steps and cylinder pipes. I also used some of the parts intended to improve the tender. Touch-up painting then ensued, using Railmatch malachite which was a fair match to the Hornby shade. To my eye, it looks almost bang-on but the camera inevitably picks up some variation in hue, as evidenced between the body and the deflectors. The model very much still displays its Triang-Hornby heritage around the wheels and rods, but I feel that, taken as a whole, it's now far more at home among the more modern models - a testament to the basic body shape being very good, and in proportion. So there you go - nothing very clever, and very far from finescale modelling, but a nice way to keep an old loco in running condition. Cheers and thanks for reading.
    22 points
  44. Not much active modelling recently, but i took advantage of the good weather to take a section of the layout into the back garden and pose a couple of trains. First up, we see the part completed Rebuilt Royal Scot, 46109, having arrived with a returning Wakes Week holiday excursion. Then a more prototypical push-pull train, hauled/propelled by BR Standard Class 2 tank, 84012. Dave.
    22 points
  45. With the tinking table open again, I’m trying to get another loco finished before Stonehouse goes to Expo EM. It’s one of the ex PD&SWJR 0-6-2T’s built by Hawthorn Leslie. The origin of the model is a CSP kit and has been on my to do list for a while. The chassis will be compensated and I’ve got the body done. Frames are done with rods etc and next will be to fit the wheels. The high level gearbox is in the bench so hopefully not too far to go now.
    21 points
  46. I have been relaxing a bit, doing some layout maintenance and just running trains. All is now running smoothly and I can sit back and watch….. Well that was the idea. One of the problems with having a real good clean up of the railway room is that you end up with a nice clear workbench. All the tools put away tidily, the materials stocked in the right drawers. Yes, well. They say nature abhors a vacuum. I think we should change that to plasticard abhors an empty workbench. So a read of the wagon book, a look at some diagrams. Diagram 21 Loco Coal wagons. All easy shapes to cut on the silhouette, stick them together. Add a few bits of wire and brass and I end up with a couple of wagons. A pic of them in the raw state ready for a spot of primer. Compared to a photo. In the last blog Mikkel noticed the old dumb buffered pig iron wagon sitting there as the GCS passed. It is a funny wee thing, pre diagram and based on a photo. It is a bit of a pet wagon, probably the first scratchbuilt EM wagon I made way back about 1990. It really does look like wood, because it is made of wood with brass bits stuck on. The bolt heads are just spots of epoxy. Rather crude perhaps, but I’m rather fond of it.
    21 points
  47. Happy to report the tinking table has been reinstated! It’s been a quiet (by my standards anyway) couple of years on the modelling front. Primarily due to a divorce which thankfully is now all resolved. The house was sold in December and I moved into my new abode just after Christmas. After sorting the essentials I was able to build a new modelling bench in the box room. This also houses the office desk on the opposite wall but I’m left with a 6ft bench to play with. It’s so nice to have some space again and somewhere to put things. Still some more to do, shelves etc and a new task light. Plenty of layout space downstairs too when I have time. Just need to unpack everything now! The 1361 was the first customer having the rear wheels’ back to back pulled out as somehow they’d gone too tight. Happy days!
    20 points
  48. Next step is to get on with some chassis building. Drummond designed these engines with a 7’6 + 8’9 wheelbase. This layout proved successful and was repeated on a number of subsequent designs. I therefore started with a set of Gibson milled frames for the 782 class, these are solid and of a heavier brass than normally found in etch kits. First things first. A set of coupling rods. These are the Gibson universal etch, soldered up so that the fluted parts go to the inside creating plain rods. Basic frames made up. The spacers are double sided copperclad, the strong glass fibre type. I didn’t include a vertical spacer, solder it all up vertical and it stays like that, one advantage of the thicker Gibson frames. The 323s were long at the rear, 8’ 8 3/4 “ from rear axle cl to buffer face. These frames have been extended to suit, a bit more than needed so I can trim them to the rear of the buffer beam when the footplate is made up. Brake hangers are 1 mm od brass tube, makes the brakes an easier fit later. I have given it a coat of black, I know a lot will come off but so long as the areas behind the wheels stay on I’ll be happy. A running chassis. All very conventional with a simple compensation beam. The plunger pickups are 1mm brass rod in a brass tube with a 9 thou guitar string spring. I have had issues with the Gibson style plungers in the past and if they go wrong its a devil of a job getting at them. This way they can be removed and replaced easily. Carbon brushes might be better, if I could think of a way of making them. High level gearbox and a Chinese motor, final position to be worked out later. Of course the question is does it run? A bit of video of it scuttling back and forth through pointwork. Footplate next.
    20 points
  49. Over the last month PPD have been kept busy with a couple of projects. I've been helping my friends at Brassmasters with a potential EasiChas project. As I mentioned a couple of months back the cab windows provided for the J17 in the PDK kit I'm building didn't seem to match the GERS drawing very well. I received the replacement etches from PPD and will see how they go together over the next week or so. The second project has been considerably more complex. Following on from the Easichas for the Hornby J15 i thought I'd try to apply the same principles to the Bachmann Ivatt 2MT. This is very much a work in progress and at this point I'm still at the 'can I get these bits to fit together well enough for me to keep going with the build and find the next set of problems with the etch?' stage. So far I have made the Easichas overlay fit and got the basic drive assembled. This utilizes the original chassis block, motor and gear tower. I've spotted several mistakes, mostly in the form of 'that hole needs moving by .5mm' but nothing too catastrophic. I over compensated for the lack of clearance between coupling and connecting rod so the cylinders, which are currently too far apart, can be moved back to a more scale spacing. I was quite pleased with the way the cross head folded up and soldered together. Using a similar principle to the brakes on my J15 these etchings can be tinned, concertinaed together and soldered up before removing from outer frame. There are some minor tweaks to make but not bad for a first attempt. The replacement tender chassis etch also folded up easily. Obviously I still have to assemble the valve gear, brakes, cylinders etc but it is coming along. Wish me luck as I make my second attempt of Walschaerts valve gear. This time I have will not have the advantage of etches from Dave Bradwell or his helpful advise on the Scalefour Forum. If this doesn't fit together I have only myself to blame! David
    20 points
  50. I had the opportunity over the last few weeks to model up a batch of Cavan and Leitrim four wheel vans. These started out as rather odd wagons, with an external wooden frame and a central section of roof left open to be covered with a tarpaulin. Apparently they doubled up as both general goods vans and cattle wagons depending on weather it was cattle market day! As with all things C&L they were rebuilt over the years and the appearance in later years depended very strongly on who was in the workshop during the rebuild - it seems no two are the same. I've printed these at .03mm layer resolution on my Phrozen Sonic Mini 4K, print time was about 5 hours for the 3 wagons, I could have got 4 on the plate bed if I hadn't added another little project. I think this is called getting the maximum out of one print run. I've not done any clean up on these other than to remove the support structure, the bottom etches will need a bit of tidying up with a file. For reference these wagons as in 4mm scale for 3' narrow gauge and each wagon is ~ 62mm x 30mm x 32mm First up with have a van with full external framing, full length centre doors and sun roof. Next we have one with a drop down section and diagonal bracing on the centre doors. Finally we have a later rebuild with a lowered complete roof, planked centre doors and the original ventilation planks replaced. These will be delivered to the chassis workshop soon to be married with some etched chassis. This has been a fun little project and I look forward to seeing what the C&L (North Essex division) makes of them. At the same time I also drew up the back-head detail for my J17, this came out pretty well only I didn't allow enough space for the rear wheels (doh!). I think I'll probably add a few more pipe runs but I'm struggling to find any pictures of J17 back-heads. I'm very impressed with the Phrozen Aqua-Grey 4K resin, it does appear to print very nicely. David
    20 points
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