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  1. Mo and I spent a wonderful weekend at The 2mm Scale Association's Diamond Jubilee Exhibition at the Derby Conference Centre. It was my privilege to be invited as after-dinner speaker. I don't know if I was entirely on my best form, but Mo and I attended my younger brother's funeral yesterday, and different thoughts were present. Anyway, I took the opportunity to grab some pictures............ Coal Road by Rod McCall. Copenhagen Fields from the MRC. Evercreech Junction by Alan Smith and Keith Gloster. Ivybridge by John Aldrick. Llangerisech by Nigel Ashton. Moretonhamstead by Pete Warren. And Padstow and Wadebridge by John Greenwood. I wasn't able to take pictures of every layout, but there were some absolute beauties. May I please thank all the Association members for putting on such a great show?
    68 points
  2. I recently showed a few refurbished wagons and, in addition to those, I also completed this more recently purchased Peco Parkside former LNER 12 ton ‘Lowfit’. Like most things I make and model, I try to add something or improve them in such a way that individualises them – while I get that the success, accuracy or otherwise is often limited by my time, ability, mojo and access to information. Many moons ago there was an article in MRJ203 by Geoff Kent on ‘Little Boxes – The H-Type Container’ and I had always fancied trying to recreate something similar, so with the build of this wagon that’s what I have tried to do. The H-type container was generally used to carry bricks and such like (and was permitted to travel in Lowfits) – the MRJ article has some interesting background history to their service use – with up to four being carried in a wagon. For the wagon, first up I modified the deck fixing by replacing the moulded fasteners with chain loops, secured by fine brass wire; not really seen or needed but I thought it an easy improvement. And then I built five H-Type containers from 30 thou plastic sheet (if doing it again, I’d use thinner); I built five because I guessed no matter how carefully I measured, cut and glued the plastic card, if I’d have done four and put them together, they would have been either too long or too short, so five meant I could swap them around to get the best fit. The corners had angle plastic strip glued, which were further ‘thinned’ and I made the lifting rings from thin brass strip with a wire loop soldered to the end. I did try filing brass strip, as described by Geoff to make these, but I couldn’t get the consistency I wanted. Further reinforcing strip and the end opening metalwork was represented with 5 thou plastic strip. Rivet detail was added from Micro Crystal Klear applied with a cocktail stick; I tried Archers Rivet transfers but the ones I have are too big. Four of the five boxes were test fit and then added to a base/false floor to keep them all together. I also decided to make up some brick loads from scribed plastic card, which are removable. The containers were then painted grey and weathered inside and out. In reality they seem to have had a hard life and were perhaps more worn and damaged than I’m portraying them. Basic home-produced transfers and a bit of weathering was applied. While mine are not as precise or fine as those modelled in the MRJ article, I’m happy with them. The fifth ‘spare’ container will likely find a home somewhere on my ‘one-day’ layout. Upgrades for the wagon were brake safety loops (Bill Bedford and .45mm wire), sprung buffers (the plastic housings drilled out and Gibson heads and springs fitted), vacuum pipes and screw couplings (Roxey). Lead sheet was cut and fitted to the underside of the wagon to provide weight. Kind regards, Iain
    68 points
  3. 67 points
  4. Seeing as I seem to have sadly lost most of my old pictures from previous threads on here, I figured it was a good excuse as any to whack a few back up, and probably expand my thread lurking to beyond the 3D printing arena!! :) Model village, know known as Lower Grampton on my dads model railway, the railway cottages, and the King Henry Arms below.
    62 points
  5. Thanks for those very kind words Covkid, I do have a few more pics I will try to add on here in the next few days if doesn't start to get a bit repetitive! View from the railway up to the railway cottages at the back of the farm to the left View down to the Brick Dairy at the bottom of the hill, past old Betty's cottage to the right! And a overview of the model showing where everything is in relation to each other. Apologies Rookie error with the picture spacing
    61 points
  6. The Damaged Roof Part 2 The covering 1. The covering is some plain napkins cut roughly oversized 2. I use all the time Roket glue as it sets quickly and bonds very well At this point you need to decided what is going to be covered and what is going to be exposed, do not allow any glue to get on the boarded area otherwise its game over and you'll have to start again....! Glue applied and ready for napkin... 3. Carefully apply the napkin straight onto the roof and don't drag in about as it will tear incredibly easily plus could spread the glue to areas you don't want it 4. Apply some more glue to the top with a stiff brush to ripple the napkin, again care needed. And leave at least an hour to dry otherwise if still wet/damp you won't be able to cut if properly 5. Using a very sharp lines use the pencil lines that will be ghosting through the napkin to cut the sheets as required to expose the painted planks underneath 6. Then, using your imagination, start pulling back the pieces of napkin and fold over. In my case I used the pin vice with the needle in to carefully manipulate the napkin into the right position When happy dab some glue on with a paint brush to seal and fix in position 6. Seal all the unglued pieces of napkin, very clear to see as they will be white and this glue goes a yellowy colour. Cut some card as battens and fix along the pencil lines ghosting though, only on the roof covering as they will have assumed to have been ripped off the exposed area. 7. Leave to dry, normally an hour will suffice and then paint. In this case I have just done Black grey with some white powder brush lightly on. The battens are a weak wash of light grey and the nails are a felt tip pen crudely applied as I could find my nice sharp one!!!! I have also used the pin vice to give some nail effects to the boards... One thing that does show up nicely is the slightly rippled effect you can get by stippling the glue into the napkin, again applies a roof beginning to be in distress Well, I hope that is of use and now I have a piece of roof that I have no use... Anyone want it, let me know and I will send it on.... otherwise It will be the bin...
    59 points
  7. My 10 ft x 2ft layout Park Road Tmd. Built originally by Craig Watson.
    59 points
  8. The power of social media never fails to amaze me at times. Details of the theft of all the locomotives on Liverpool Lime Street model railway was put on Facebook and here on RMWeb. The posts had 500 shares and reached over 14000 people. Some comments received gave us information that may help retrieve the models. This information has been passed on to the police who are actively looking into the case. In addition one of the persons we reached sent us a surplus EM gauge model of a Black 5 loco to replace one of the stolen locos. Such generosity amongst the model railway fraternity shows how we come together in the face of adversity.
    58 points
  9. Summer at Corwenna Clay Dries. This model at Beaconsfield show this Saturday.
    55 points
  10. Thanks once again for all the messages of condolence. They are appreciated, and it shows what a caring community RMweb is. Things are slowly 'getting back to normal', inasmuch as I've got guests visiting again. Today, it was Geoff Cook from Rugby (another ex-teacher). He brought with him some delightful GNR/pre-Grouping items; including........... Some assorted scratch-built/kit-built wagons. Two scratch-built bogie brick wagons. A Craftsman C12 and scratch-built vehicles. A scratch-built ECJS twelve-wheeler. A scratch-built Howlden six-wheeler. And a Little Engines N1 and further scratch-built stock. Thanks for bringing these, Geoff. How nice to see some excellent examples of personal, 'proper' modelling.
    55 points
  11. I had another trip to 'York' yesterday and took a lot of pictures, some of which hopefully replace some of the lost ones. The area I did last time has gained some trees and the land on the right has been surfaced and the railway part fenced off. We spent a lot of time yesterday fitting facia boards to the edges of the laoyut; like framing a picture it finishes things off neatly and makes it look finished. I use white faced hardboard for this as it can be but with a Stanley knife, curved and it takes paint well. It will be painted dark grey when it's all in place. I finished off these platform ends which just need a spot of weathering now. Station nameboards and lamps have been put in place now too. Just the tops of the coal drops need finishing off in this scene now. Facias have been fitted on the other side too. I've tidied up the garden along the edge. We've reinstated the backscene behind the riverside houses. Next stop Newcastle. Peter
    54 points
  12. My latest build came off my workbench about a week ago : It's a GWR 70'0" Steam Rail Motor to Diagram O finished as built in March 1906 condition. The body (sides and ends) are Worsley Works (scratch aid "kit"), the rest is scratch built (the kit represents the preserved No. 93 of Diagram R (of 1908) so I've subtly amended the etches to model the earlier diagram. Livery applied by me including the transfers for the "prize monogram" that some of these carried when out-shopped late 1905/early 1906. Oh, by the way it's 2mm Finescale. Thanks for looking. Ian
    54 points
  13. Over the last few weeks, I have been focusing on my other layout East Road TMD. This layout has been through many changes. This may well not be the last change but it is one that I am completely happy with. It is a 5ft by 18in end to end diorama. DCC operated with 3v powered lighting. The few images below give in insight in to the layout.
    54 points
  14. A little offering, hopefully it will not offend the objectionable critics who are having such a bad day they had to say it twice!!! Maybe the garden wall in the background will be objectionable with this one?
    53 points
  15. Time for a cheeky bit of MoD wagonry! VAA Vans by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr Last year's loco projects were very all-consuming, taking almost every spare bit of modelling time to get over the line, so now that they're all done, it gave some time to pick up some smaller fun little projects in-between building the big layout. VAA Vans by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr Today welcomes a trio of VAA wagons to the fleet, based on examples active on MoD traffic through Didcot in the late '90s. The project here dates back to deep in pandemic-time, Autumn 2020 and I picked up a bundle of Bachmann VAA's and set about painting them up to match photos found on Flickr. VAA Vans by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr There's nothing I love more than buying a cheap wagon, knowing there's a fun project ahead. I picked these VAA's up some years back from a good friend at the club, knowing that the subdued brown liveries would soon make way for something more colourful! VAA Vans by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr Each wagon replicates an actual prototype, all sporting the classic BR Railfreight red & grey of the 1980s, albeit looking somewhat more battered and faded by the late 1990s. Various Humbrol paints were mixed together to replicate the faded shades, before being gloss varnished and Railtec & Modelmaster decals applied, before a final coat of Railmatch matt varnish to seal in the decals. This was late 2020, and at this point, life got in the way (not to mention 11 model ZKV 'Barbels', 40 diesel locomotives and a pair of Great Western HST power cars!) but fast forward to 2022, I could now dig these out and start finishing off from where I'd started! VAA Vans by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr Armed with some free time and Green Day on the iPod, I set about doing some paint-on/wipe-off weathering coatings to each wagon, to take the edge off the sharp liveries, and get a build up of grime in the hard-to-reach places on each model. Layers of colour were built up over a few weeks, with rusty browns and darker grime colours, being painted on almost neat, wiped off with kitchen towel, and wiped down with cotton buds dipped in enamel thinners. The roof tops of the VAAs are most interesting, each one being slightly different, and generally in pretty bad condition by my modelling time period! VAA Vans by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr Notably the roof strapping could be seen on each wagon, so lots of masking tape was cut up and laid on to mottle in some dark brown/dark grey strapping over the basic colour of the roof. It's key to look at the photos here of the chosen wagon to get its unique roof appearance, this dictates not only the base colours but also the additional patterns/fading/patches on top. VAA Vans by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr Some of the roof tops had a more textured surface than others, so talcum powder comes in handy for adding a teensy bit of texture to wet paint, being puffed very lightly onto the roof and brushed in. It also serves to mute the colours down and gives a pleasing finish to the roof. VAA Vans by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr Moving back down to the sides, the plethora of tiny marks can then be added on, using a fine 5/0 paintbrush. VAA Vans by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr Areas that were interesting to model on the trio here were the streaking marks around the door handles, plus the rusty/dirt/oil build ups in the hinge mechanisms, as well as some of the general bodyside markings. Once satisfied, each wagon was then given a final coat of Railmatch matt varnish to seal in the weathering and give it some protection agains the rigours of exhibition life ahead! First up is VAA 200100, a brightly coloured red example, holding on to the majority of its livery, although the old Railfreight logo has been patch-painted out. VAA Vans by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr One fiddly part of the weathering was touching in each of the rivets where needed, using the tiny 5/0 paintbrush, following the Flickr pictures available. Next up was VAA 200031, in a much more faded version of the same livery, although, holding onto its lovely Railfreight logo! VAA Vans by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr Peppered with little dinks, scratches and scars left by removed MoD explosives stickers, the bodyside was great fun to model and portrays a very hard worked wagon towards the end of its mainline career. VAA Vans by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr Little finishing touches on the wagon include adding the Colin Craig etched brake discs onto the faces of the wagons, I believe that nowadays these are available from Stenson Models. I stick these onto the wheel using Krystal Klear PVA glue, and once dry, paint over & wipe off a layer of dark grey to take the sheen off the stainless steel metal disc. The rear face and front edges of the wheels are also painted to remove any unwanted shiny metal from showing through. VAA Vans by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr The last wagon in today's trio is VAA 200126, another faded derivative of the classic Railfreight livery, with painted-out logos and damages across the sides in a number of places. VAA Vans by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr For the underframes, these are left as delivered by Bachmann, and painted dark brown, with highlights of darker brown, dark grey and gunmetal grey around the oily parts. VAA Vans by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr I've had great fun with these vans, although a protracted project, it was good to pick these back up again and since doing these, it has reignited an interest in tackling the wagons again, it is refreshing how much of a quicker project they make compared to some of the big diesel locos seen further up the pages! VAA Vans by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr Keep an eye out for more fun quickies coming soon! Cheers, James
    52 points
  16. I'm pleased to report that, whatever might have been going on elsewhere, a full service of trains - passenger, goods and parcels - ran through Stoke Courtenay today. John C.
    51 points
  17. As the sun begins to set 'Merrdin Emrys', 'Livingston Thompson' and 'Prince' shunt the sidings at Avalon shed.
    50 points
  18. Thanks Simon, And all who've responded. It was very sudden (and unexpected); a massive heart attack. Being close in age (he born in '47, me in '46), we were both lifelong friends and mortal enemies (such is sibling rivalry), but did most things together, trainspotting being our principal hobby as boys. We also built train sets together. He kept the original stuff, after I took railway modelling 'more seriously'. He leaves a wonderful, extended family. Regards, Tony.
    50 points
  19. The roof is done, didn’t take as long as I thought it would once I had come up with how I was going to do it…..
    50 points
  20. Yes it does so I find that a quite offending comment to make; you have no idea how much time and effort has been expended at this end. I'm here on a Sunday evening helping some users with queries but, when I read posts like that, I question whether it's any good for me anymore.
    50 points
  21. Now the part my customer had done while I've been unable to visit. For the first time we have been able to run trains around the whole circuit which was hugely satisfying. Still work to do in this area, but the trains run through the crossing beautifully. The track in the loco yard is complete and the baseboard for the tracks in the foreground is in place. The area I did today is in the distance. This fiddle yard is temporary but it does allow trains to be run right round at last. I brought the lorry today, not perfect but the best I could find. A view along the station to the new fiddle yard at the far end. There's still a lot to do, but we're certainly making progress. I'll be back for more next week, Peter
    49 points
  22. Nottingham to Loughborough on the Midland line in black and white today. Nottingham Midland 4F 43947 light engine west of station c1949 JM010 Kegworth area LMS 8F 8178 goods 1947 JVol1399 Loughborough Midland 3F 43232 le c1951 JVol4021 Loughborough Midland 8F 48606 up goods 1955 JMImageB04 Loughborough Midland crossing the line - not allowed now! c1955 JBWImageU05 Loughborough Midland Jubilee 45566 Queensland down ex pass c1955 JBWImageU03 David
    47 points
  23. After a quiet period, the local passenger working is due. The passengers are waiting on the departure platform, looking expectantly towards Kirkby Heights bridge for the tell tale plume of smoke. Deeley 0-6-4T simmers on the up line. Later in in the day, the local stopping goods from Grassington has arrived and the engine is sorting out wagons which arrived yesterday for the main line goods to Hunslet yard, Leeds.
    47 points
  24. Easy ... another two feet ... slowly now ...
    47 points
  25. Hi everyone, Just to bring you up to speed with everything. The containers of Deltics arrive at our warehouse today after arriving at port late last week (and delayed of course with the Bank Holiday weekend) Once they arrive they will be unloaded, pallets broken down, counted into stock, checked, then picked, packed and posted out to several thousand of you. As you can imagine this will take a number of days to complete (well over a week, perhaps closer to two) but we will keep you updated on how it is all going. We will then inform you that we have finished the process and if you have not heard anything by then we will encourage you to email us with your order number for an update (there is always one order that slips through cracks, but the stock will be accounted for so there will be no need to panic!) Cheers! Fran
    47 points
  26. Today we've mainly been fine tuning the DCC programming :)
    46 points
  27. Works progressing on sheds… Quick snippet….
    46 points
  28. Hi Al, It's an interesting one. We have made improvements to parcel packaging since the first day (really wasn't acceptable and caused issues for sure) and it has cut down on reports significantly. The return ratio to locomotives sent out is under 1% so far, so while damning photos (and they kill us to see, really do) stick in the mind and show something that shouldn't happen, there are literal 1000s who are happy out and have had them arrive intact and ready to go. I think bad news always sticks in the minds rather than good news, hence how newspapers sell. But, while we likely did push the detail envelope to the real outer edge with the bogie chains, overall most have arrived spot on and have been enjoyed. Will we make improvements going forward? You bet. Should there be bits in the box? Absolutely not. But, in the vast majority of cases it has not been occurring. If it has, just one email to us and we will sort you out. Cheers! Fran
    45 points
  29. A further study of D3509 at Sheep Dip. Rob
    45 points
  30. Whilst I go and find my Thompson B1s and will take some photos accordingly, I shared with Tony recently a few pics of a W1/Hush-Hush build that was started with the purchase of two damaged Hornby bodyshells off eBay. Here they are as purchased: As you can see, the deflectors in particular are very badly damaged. No problem, I thought...so after some careful gluing/filling/sanding/and paint on the less damaged one to check a paint match, here were the two bodyshells: A cruel closeup on the one with the paint match test. It has since been brushed back for a coat of aerosol paint on the offending area of the deflector. Nevertheless, the paint chosen for the burnished steel and the deflectors match Hornby's original colour scheme. In the meantime, I put together spare parts, approaching Graeme King for the cartazzi parts from his resin W1 kits (these have been altered slightly to match the as-built loco, Graeme's kit is for the rebuilt locomotive). The other parts were two Hornby A3 chassis I had spare (and had been lying around doing nothing for at least six or seven years), and two Hornby Railroad Flying Scotsman 1928 tenders, which were subsequently modified and painted accordingly. Another cruel closeup shows I have to modify the position of the cartazzi, and then build it up, at the rear end to match the as-built W1. The tender paint and lettering (Fox Transfers) matches Hornby's bodyshell perfectly. The current state of affairs: There are many more modifications to carry out on the model, including but not limited to the cylinders, the eccentric, new extension frames, correct bogie type and in the right colour, but... ...recycling these damaged bodyshells into something workable has been very pleasing, and hopefully the results will be worth the effort, with one loco going on eBay to help pay for my upcoming wedding, and the other locomotive going into my private collection of L.N.E.R. machines. Is a brand new Hornby W1 better than my way? Absolutely, for a frills and all model of the W1. Has mine come out cheaper? At £25 a bodyshell plus £70ish for all of the parts (and using up two spare chassis that had sat around for years), also yes. Is recycling the bodyshells good? I think so, maybe there's a bit of the environmentalist still in me that hates waste and would rather take someone else's broken things and fix them and make them into something workable. By far the thing I am happiest about is the paintwork. I nailed the colour choices, I feel, and I hope you agree. I'll post an update if it is of interest once the models are complete. Thanks to Graeme King for digging out his moulds and providing me with the impetus to fix the locos.
    45 points
  31. NEW ANNOUNCEMENT - Delicious Subs! Mark 1 56ft 11" Suburban Coaches in OO/4mm Our latest announcement sees us tackle the star of 'wish lists' across the land. The people movers of the 50s. 60s, and 70s. The unsung heroes of the Mark 1 family and of course, the perfect bedfellows for our forthcoming Class 31 locomotives. Welcome everyone, to the 56ft 11" Mark 1 suburban coaches, by Accurascale. The latest addition to our "Moving Britain" range of coaching stock! As you can imagine, we have gone to town on these coaches, offering all the body variants so you can build up a prototypical rake for your layout. Not only that, but we have a fully lit, fully detailed interior packed with easy access and other innovations, beautifully detailed underframe, bogies and bodysides as these distinctive carriages get the full Accurascale treatment. Multiple running numbers in both BR Carmine and BR Blue make up the first run, with runs in BR Maroon to follow later. Delivery is anticipated for Q3 2023 with decorated samples due later in the year. Prices for all this awesomeness is £64.95 per coach, with 10% off when you order two or more, as well as free postage and packaging across the UK. If you order two or more coaches direct from Accurascale, you can also select to pay a deposit and then the balance when the coaches arrive in stock, or easy installments over six months at no extra cost! These buttons will appear in your cart ahead of check out. You can also order them from your preferred local stockist. Read all about our latest coach range and place your pre-order right here: https://accurascale.co.uk/blogs/news/delicious-subs-welcome-to-our-mark-1-suburban-coaches-in-oo-4mm (As always, usual caveats about fit and finish on these early samples apply, but constructive feedback is always welcomed!) Cheers! Fran
    45 points
  32. The Midland around Nottingham today in black and white. We have travelled back to the early 1950s. Annesley MR 3F 43369 down goods May 52 JVol6128 Basford 3F 43587 up goods c1950 JVol4166 Basford Gas Works EMGAS Ruston 4wds Victoria c1952 JVol4129 Basford Tilbury Tank 41947 Nottingham to Mansfield c1951 JVol7171 Bobbers Mill 2P 40518 up pass c1953 JVol4259 Bobbers Mill 8F 48675 up goods c1952 JVol2240 David
    45 points
  33. Now, I can't quite put my finger on it but this picture caught my eye... Space, depth and lighting seems nicely balanced, another iPhone effort.
    44 points
  34. At Yelverton a sailor returning from leave prepares to board the train which will take him back to Plymouth and his ship.
    44 points
  35. Middle Farm expansion building works are complete. Trees and vegetation planted and taking root. Daft, illogical, impractical layout it is but doesn't that follow real life where you look at something and think...why did they do that like that... More items in hand to dress the area and make look like it's in use.
    43 points
  36. Been growing ivy today Need to let the glue dry before sealing and adding some paint detailing.
    43 points
  37. A few more iPhone efforts....
    43 points
  38. Hi everyone, We would never expect anyone to accept a paint defect. If we include the Sam's trains review there have been 3 reports of paint issue. The one reported here is (I believe) in the hands of our customer service team for replacement and the other is a no quibble replacement emailed to us. I think it's important to remember that we are here to help too, and it's not just "there's your lot, don't call us, we'll call you so accept it". We want all our customers to be happy with what they have bought. Of course, there are 1000s of Deltics out there all perfect, but as two reports of paint defects come are posted online the anxiety kicks in and the narrative can soon become "oh all the Accurascale Deltics have paint issues" when it's obviously not the case. As we said, we welcome the constructive feedback, it helps us do better. However, some sense of perspective in the grand scheme of things is always good too. If there is an issue, you just email us and we will assist you to get it rectified. Cheers! Fran
    43 points
  39. It did manage two bricks totalling 8.6kg, equivalent to 53 Mk1 coaches but the tension lock couplings couldn't hold out any longer.
    43 points
  40. “Quick, he’s not looking. We can nip over and see if there’s anything else.”
    43 points
  41. Some more wanderings around Park Road Depot.
    43 points
  42. Forge forging ahead, brick paper to add to chimney stack then Next task painting.
    43 points
  43. 33008 taking cement empties to Barnstaple: And something that doesn’t get modelled very often. A 50 on an HST rescue mission…
    43 points
  44. Another lucky dip of photos for today, I hope they are enjoyable. Bebside Blyth and Tyne Class 43 up diverted ex pass April 81 C5319 New Holland Town Class 114 dmu leaving for Barton on Humber 11 Aug77 C3470 Mistley on the Harwich line Class 37 Parkeston Quay to Liverpool St The Day Continental, line to quayside on left July 75 J4534 Tilbury Town 302 226 approaching station in distance 4 May 80 C5038 Tywyn Classes 101 and 103 Machynlleth to Pwlhelli July 82 C5765 David
    42 points
  45. Last in the sequence of iPhone pictures, generally pleased with the results but next set back to my proper camera.
    42 points
  46. My Dad died at one o'clock this morning. RIP Dad. Dave
    42 points
  47. Forge update Most of the painting done, just needs some weathering. Chimney done, complete with lead flashing! Left to dry overnight now as I am close to damaging the previous finishes......
    42 points
  48. First pass at painting. Need to let dry otherwise we are back to reactivating previous coat.
    42 points
  49. This picture was taken on my iPhone with the main room light off, so in effect reduced lighting but the phone used its low light ability, compensated and I got this. I have to say it is rather crisp and sharp, again taken from further way but cropped to bring closer so giving the effect of more in focus. I will be trying this again.....
    41 points
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