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Just checked “Dalkey Archive”, fiction about a mad scientist wanting to kill everyone by removing oxygen from the atmosphere, and now can appreciate the comment.

There was a concise article about the Kingstown and Dalkey origins in the “Irish Times”

https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/steaming-to-kingstown-and-sucking-up-to-dalkey-the-dublin-kingstown-railway-1.2506780

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3 hours ago, Northroader said:

Just checked “Dalkey Archive”, fiction about a mad scientist wanting to kill everyone by removing oxygen from the atmosphere, and now can appreciate the comment.

There was a concise article about the Kingstown and Dalkey origins in the “Irish Times”

https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/steaming-to-kingstown-and-sucking-up-to-dalkey-the-dublin-kingstown-railway-1.2506780

 

If you want to hear what Flann O'Brien (or Myles na gCopaleen, or plain old Brian O'Nolan) had to say about railways, start here:

 

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/cruiskeen-lawn-june-24th-july-8th-1942-1.614120

 

Maybe someone could design a compound 2-8-2 for use on the C&L coal trains, though the authorities in Inchicore might have something to say on the subject: those are the boys that don't forget a slight in a hurry, particularly one published in the Times.

 

 

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Now when the Great Northern actually wanted to build compounds in the early 30s, Glover sent over to Derby for advice, with highly satisfactory results. But Bowman Malcolm up on the Northern Counties had been building Worsdell-von Borries compounds since the 70s.

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26 minutes ago, Northroader said:

Derby took over the Northern Counties so they must have pinched his ideas to start with, then?

 

By no means, though I think there is a link - Walter Mackersie Smith (of Japanese Railways fame) as usual. The Midland's Smith Johnson compounds of 1902 of course precede the Midland's acquisition of the BNCR and have their roots in Smith's 3-cylinder compound experiment on the North Eastern, where he was Wilson Worsdell's chief draughtsman. He had been Johnson's chief draughtsman at Cowlairs before he went to Japan. On the North Eastern, he had been involved with the testing, at least, of T.W. Worsdell's two-cylinder compounds. I gather that he put together the test report that includes the maximum speed of 90 mph obtained with the Class J 4-2-2 compound No. 1517, which is the joint highest authenticated speed on British railways in the 19th century. (The other 90 mph being recorded by Charles Rous Marten with Johnson's piston-valve 4-2-2 No. 117 on a down express on the Midland main line out of St Pancras.)

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Of the four MGWR locos I’ve showed here, one was from a Leinster Models kit, one had a CCW chassis kit, and the other two were scratchbuilt. I’m afraid Leinster and CCW are no longer with us, but it is possible to do two of the locos from more recent kits. I should stress that I have no interests with the maker of these kits, but would like to draw your attention to them if you fancy a go at the MGWR. The two are etched brass in 7mm scale, with the possibility of doing them as standard gauge or Irish 5’3”, and are the 2-4-0 tender engine and the 2-2-2 tank engine. They are by Alphagraphix, who had the trading method of having a sales stand at shows, notably the Guildex O gauge show, or doing postal orders out of a catalogue. Since April they have got a website up and running:

https://www.alphagraphixkits.co.uk

You'll find there are several kits for other Irish Lines, plus a few coach kits. In addition there are some kits for 4wheel coaches for British Light Railways, which I find very tempting. Besides this there is a range of printed card kits, both rolling stock and buildings, in 7mm and 4mm scales. These are quite cheap, and I have seen them used as templates for models in plastic, besides getting done on their own. I find it is necessary to paint the buildings with flat varnish to try and arrest fading, which happens with printed card, particularly things like red brick.

Here are three Alphagraphix card kits for Irish vans, the card being glued on a supporting card backing, then cut out and the cut edges tinted. I build them around a wood block to add some weight, and one has a corrugated iron roof out of plastic sheet, as well as receiving the “soft top” wagon sheets. Then I’ve made up a chassis from strip brass, plus buffers and draw gear. Two came with GSR and CIE markings, these have been blobbed out and pregroup markings substituted.8D11D714-3B80-4C0A-B9F6-2E492D811C3A.jpeg.4ac908e116028adfdef5f9435c2cd0ee.jpeg

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1 hour ago, Northroader said:

They are by Alphagraphix, who had the trading method of having a sales stand at shows, notably the Guildex O gauge show, or doing postal orders out of a catalogue. Since April they have got a website up and running:

https://www.alphagraphixkits.co.uk

Oh wow! - this is wonderful!  Thank you Mr Northroader for posting the link.

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Having a backscene support, I really need to stick a backscene onto it. This job is really a patchwork quilt, having been with me for several sizes of layout, and as a result having been trimmed and patched for the different sizes. It’s also had patches from scenes Ive made that I liked stuck on to the backing paper, and more recently I’ve overpainted pieces that made the composition look too crowded. I prefer blue skies and small clouds, but following recent conversation on here I’ve gone for more like eight tenths cloud, any more and I fancy it’s going to get very dowdy. There ‘tis, my fancy for an Irish countryside scene.

706D23F5-D027-4A73-AB9A-112C433E943F.jpeg.ccdced887ac1401a48d079dca76d0bb2.jpeg6FD24325-5B89-4F99-AF30-055CCE23F408.jpeg.70fd3ea2148a19a22063d7ae292a28a0.jpeg

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I’ve been looking over the fence admiring the white hot progress of technology from folks who are adept at computers, and how designs they produce can be turned into 3D so easily. Seeing 3D printing some years ago at model shows left me unimpressed, mainly because of the “layered” look they were getting, but there’s realisation that technical improvements have been in progress, so I thought I really ought to see what things are like now, and made a visit to the highly industrious Simon Dawson’s site.

http://www.rue-d-etropal.com/3D-printing/3d_printed_designs.htm

Here i picked out a four wheel coach for a sample, and placed my order through to Shapeways. About a week has passed, and postie dropped off a cardboard box full of bubble wrap this morning. I have to say I was quite pleased at the finish of their print, no layering to see, a nice slightly grainy surface, a reasonably tough material, and really good detailing. Now to order some wheels and see how I can fit them, also drawgear, plus a few fine details such as door handles and handrails. It’s very light, and the other job will be how to attach some lead flashing. When I've done this, I’ll report back. The print was to me quite a reasonable price, and I feel I’m buying time to achieve a model which needs minimal work to finish, and quickly contribute to a model picture I’m trying to form.

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As will I.

 

I have had the standard finish in 4mm, and it was expensive and really not good. I'm rather re-thinking this supplier, however, because there are now a few items in the superior material and the price differential is not as great as I expected. I think they will prove reasonable value. 

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The other plus is that pretty well all the Rue d’Etropal/Shapeways designs are offered in all the scales, quite a few designers are just interested in 00.

edit: here’s a warts n all close up of it (o scale, natch)

E06B46DE-4D12-46FE-9060-AD75D4B0B9F5.jpeg.0e90d4ff6982bc426930803dbc999e42.jpeg

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On 03/07/2021 at 19:25, F-UnitMad said:

Looks like a 'fine, soft morning' to me!! ;) :good:  :mosking:

Dhera, would you go away out of that with your soft morning? 'Tis fine. Can you not see the sun is shining in town - and over the sea too, judging by the colour of it, but that's a different matter entirely. And it might clear up later entirely, Michael, so it might.

 

(Just being picky, do you think the sea should be a bit greener under all that cloud?)

 

Alan

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16 minutes ago, islandbridgejct said:

(Just being picky, do you think the sea should be a bit greener under all that cloud?)

 

The snotgreen sea, as Buck Mulligan calls it, in Joyce's Ulysees. He provides the reference too: Epi oinopa ponton - Homer's wine-dark sea. But Joyce was describing the Irish Sea as seen from the Martello tower at Sandycove, not the wild Atlantic.

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I thought I’d stick to the convention green for the land, and blue for the sea, as I’m not a coast dweller used to seeing all the changing moods. TBH, I’m dying to get to the seaside again, haven’t been since November 2019. Up here in mid-continent it’s 31 degrees C this afternoon, and I’m in a state of torpor, although right after breakfast I did put some primer on the 3D print. Folks do say rub it in denatured alkanol, or go over it with emery paper, but I’ve just painted it straight on. You can pick out a slightly streaky appearance, I fancy this could be lost with another coat of paint. My wife says I put the paint on too thickly, but it does help me get out of decorating.

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1 hour ago, Northroader said:

I thought I’d stick to the convention green for the land, and blue for the sea, as I’m not a coast dweller used to seeing all the changing moods. TBH, I’m dying to get to the seaside again, haven’t been since November 2019. Up here in mid-continent it’s 31 degrees C this afternoon, and I’m in a state of torpor, although right after breakfast I did put some primer on the 3D print. Folks do say rub it in denatured alkanol, or go over it with emery paper, but I’ve just painted it straight on. You can pick out a slightly streaky appearance, I fancy this could be lost with another coat of paint. My wife says I put the paint on too thickly, but it does help me get out of decorating.

 

I have just been up the top of the garden and the sea is still there looking nice and blue. The bit we can see is the Bristol Channel looking across to Aberthaw and Barry. I must admit though I haven't been within toe wetting distance for months. Funny my wife complains I dont put it on thickly enough.

 

Don

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That is a lovely view, Don. My favourite outing down there is on the vintage opentop bus from outside the WSR station, through Dunster and Wheddon Cross to Exford, then up over the top of Exmoor, and you get that view right on top. Then tiptoe back down Porlock Hill, magic!

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If you are ever in this area with your bicycle  at Weddon Cross as you take the Exford road just out of the village you take a right turn  which skirts the edge of Dunkery Beacon even if you dont fancy a walk to the beacon the view from the road is tremendous.

The spectacular view from here is south to the Brendon Hills. Somewhere out in the view is Comberrow the longest incline in the country in its day.

 

Don 

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Just tried that walk on Google Maps. Very nice. Though not quite the same as doing it live, I imagine!

 

image.png.96ab44382c669dda8bd1bc586877f632.png

 

image.png.50c5e3cb3ba58f0d5ecba2d87807b58c.png

 

 

Edited by Mikkel
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Time was when I lived on a pushbike, Don, but then stuff like families happened. Some years ago, self and wife went to Brockenhurst on the train. There’s a cycle hire place in the station yard, and off we went into the New Forest, first time on a bike in years. After five miles we stopped for a picnic, we were that saddlesore, and it was a real struggle to get back to the station, so I haven’t been on a bike since. When I retired I took up walking, and have managed a lot in your area, including over Dunkery Beacon. More recently I’ve slowed right down, and it’s more of an excuse to find a country pub these days, not that I’ve out much with covid happening.

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38 minutes ago, Northroader said:

Time was when I lived on a pushbike, Don, but then stuff like families happened. Some years ago, self and wife went to Brockenhurst on the train. There’s a cycle hire place in the station yard, and off we went into the New Forest, first time on a bike in years. After five miles we stopped for a picnic, we were that saddlesore, and it was a real struggle to get back to the station, so I haven’t been on a bike since. When I retired I took up walking, and have managed a lot in your area, including over Dunkery Beacon. More recently I’ve slowed right down, and it’s more of an excuse to find a country pub these days, not that I’ve out much with covid happening.

 

Of course its Nearholmer that is the bike man. We like Walking but find doing short distances up to 5 or 6 miles is more pleasurable. We used to go off in the motorhome park on a site for several days and not use the van  just walk everywhere. These days the sites are so busy and people seem to have lost consideration for others.  Mind you we have a lot of walks on our doorstep here provided you can cope with hills .

It is a great way to explore old railways even better when you find a site like Hendy on the Tal y Llyn where the railway ran along the top of the field. The farm had its own halt. Train up to the terminus in the mountains with the dogs nice walk then lunch at Abergnolwyn station.

Don

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6 hours ago, Mikkel said:

Just tried that walk on Google Maps. Very nice. Though not quite the same as doing it live, I imagine!

 

image.png.96ab44382c669dda8bd1bc586877f632.png

 

image.png.50c5e3cb3ba58f0d5ecba2d87807b58c.png

 

 

 

To get the full virtual reality experience, put your electric fan at the top of the stairs and set it to maximum. Then climb the stairs forty times, ideally with a small child on your shoulders, while following the path on Google maps. You are allowed to take chocolate or whatever for consumption at the top.

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1 hour ago, Compound2632 said:

 

To get the full virtual reality experience, put your electric fan at the top of the stairs and set it to maximum. Then climb the stairs forty times, ideally with a small child on your shoulders, while following the path on Google maps. You are allowed to take chocolate or whatever for consumption at the top.

 

Except you miss out any chance of treading in Horse/Sheep/Cow/ Deer poo or the fun of comming face to face with a Belted Galloway or the local hunt coming through, 'Just exercising the dogs '

Don

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