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3 hours ago, Argos said:

Ah! But are you sure it's the right blue though Jim? :D

Looks pretty close to the present colour of 419 at Bo'ness (with the exception of the valences).DSC_0944.JPG.ae5997843077f5d9af16277207ba6765.JPG

 

Anyway, any blue is better than some colours I could mention!

 

Jim

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It is a very nice shade:

D6A9AD6C-4C30-4622-937D-554E6292465C.jpeg.cd902f95cd72899494bab79a84deec81.jpegDC965FC3-4902-4C10-A746-57490D8E7F39.jpeg.99d6109135e6fe299bb9a7b89cb7f29e.jpeg

 

anyway, before the GNR fades away, I should mention that their civil engineer, Mr. Mills, did develop a very distinctive style of architecture, well worth looking at:

https://irishrailwaymodeller.com/topic/10587-gnr-architecture-details/#comment-161992

Now your juices are flowing, here’s a nice small layout which shows how to get something going representative of the old line:

https://irishrailwaymodeller.com/topic/9334-brookhall-mill-a-gnri-micro-layout/#comment-145622

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785F9EDE-23F4-4434-A345-C2DD7625BE92.gif.337f4d852c47d6bbbc5033d0897153b7.gif

 

This time of year, I’m usually trying to compile a list of useful bits needed to try and finish some modelling jobs off, ready to go to the Reading Trade Show beginning of December, well organised by the Guildford Gauge 0 Group. But, no show this year, problems with the Rivermead venue, plus Covid uncertainty. Never mind, there’s always the great Bristol Gauge 0 show after the start of the New Year. Well, there I’m afraid the Hall at UWE has got itself turned into a Nightingale Hospital, so that ain’t on either. (Marvellous organisational skills displayed by our Government in the setting up of the Nightingale Hospitals at the start of the Covid outbreak, the only problem was they forgot there wouldn’t be any staff available, but hey, I’m only a taxpayer, what do I know)

What to do? Well, half way between the two is the City of Royal Wootton Bassett, for which I’m flying the flag, as there’s a Gauge 0 Trade Fair miraculously appearing here in a week’s time, which greatly deserves a link:

https://wiltshire7mmshow.com

I’m afraid the Memorial Hall where it’s staged lacks the spaciousness of the Rivermead Sports Hall or UWE Exhibition Centre, so morning and afternoon sittings are needed, which will be different, so I fancy space will be at a premium. (Note, if you do meet your mates, please be aware of how much aisle space you’re taking up while you stand talking.) Car parking is limited at the hall, head for the Borough Fields car park at Sainsbury’s, which is just ten minutes walk away. You can come by train to Swindon, head over to the bus station, five minutes walk and get a Stagecoach 55 or 54, roughly half hourly, or a Coachstyle 31 hourly, to the High Street. The refreshments there will be a bit limited, I think, but there’s some good pubs around, plus some small cafes, around the middle of town.

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1 hour ago, pete_mcfarlane said:

 

How about this for a Caledonian 4-4-0 in blue?

(OK, it's one of the Belgian 'Dunnalistair' copies, but close)

NMBS/SNCB : 18.051

 

I'd say the shade is distinctly on the lilac side!  Some where I recall seeing a photo of a bridge abutment in Belgium with the front of a Dunalastair carved in relief on it.

 

Jim

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14 minutes ago, Caley Jim said:

I'd say the shade is distinctly on the lilac side!  Some where I recall seeing a photo of a bridge abutment in Belgium with the front of a Dunalastair carved in relief on it.

 

John Thomas, The Springburn Story (David & Charles, 1964), plate on p. 110 (in the second, 1974, edition). But it's an 812, not a Dunalastair.

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2 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

 

John Thomas, The Springburn Story (David & Charles, 1964), plate on p. 110 (in the second, 1974, edition). But it's an 812, not a Dunalastair.

Thanks, Stephen.  I don't seem to have my copy of that anymore.  Must have loaned it to someone and never got it back!  :(

 

Jim

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10 minutes ago, Northroader said:

here you are, Jim, a nice shiny tram is about to be attacked by a concrete Dunalistair jumping out from behind the traffic lights. 

 

I'm pretty sure that's (a) not concrete and (b) the same 812 as in the photo in The Springburn Story:

 

212048813_CRClass7214-4-0No_732.jpg.d6d3f97c1d0817d9cc69473b1760ddee.jpg

image.png.25a5c9e2f5819cfc2fb9fa257d1f7a97.png

 

It's all in the front footplate sticking-out-e-ness.

 

The Belgian Railways bought some of each and built more of their own, along with a 4-4-2T derived from the Dunalastair.

Edited by Compound2632
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37 minutes ago, Northroader said:

FEF2F3AA-1FD3-4788-992A-9D602E9FF25E.jpeg.8b507e6890b21f8f1b92c03e65b8ec2f.jpeg

here you are, Jim, a nice shiny tram is about to be attacked by a concrete Dunalistair jumping out from behind the traffic lights. Place your bets.

Oostende if I remember rightly, what was the NMBS/SNCV, now De Lijn unless it's been reorganised again.

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3 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

I'm pretty sure that's (a) not concrete and (b) the same 812 as in the photo in The Springburn Story:

812's shared many features with the Dunanlastair 1's (721 class) and were sometimes referred to as 'Dunalastair goods'.

 

Jim

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Let the good times roll. After lunch today, I ventured out for a ten minute walk to the Memorial Hall, the Wiltshire 7mm Show being on, yeeaay!! Agreeably surprised how well the traders had slotted into the place, with decent circulation and good space on the stalls. From the bit I heard it looked to be a successful show, even if not on the hurly burly scale of Reading or Bristol. The folks I talked to were just very happy to be at a show, meeting like minded people.

i tried to do my bit to help things on, if only simple things: plastic and brass strip and rods, plus a needle file from Squires; a package of wagon crate loads from Skytrex; wagon axleguards, buffers, and ba screws from Heywood; a few figures from Omen miniatures; a pack of wagon wheels from Connoisseur; and a lowside goods wagon kit to join the general pool from Gladiator. Thanks to all involved in bringing the circus to town.

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On 19/11/2021 at 20:48, Northroader said:

I very rarely take pictures of trains, but I felt impelled to, so here’s two I took

 

I had to "clap" when seeing those photos (not clap literally, my wife would have found it odd). Lovely machines, and to think they were right there in front of you.

 

 

On 19/11/2021 at 20:48, Northroader said:

“Aha!” you say, “the Guinness Brewery”.

 

There's a handful of photos of the Guinness brewery in Dublin on Britain from Above. They aren't very clear, but this crop seems to more or less match the trackplan on Roger Farnworth's pages:

 

image.png.c930c89eb4abe54a1f88062cdff5c3fe.png

Source: Britain from Above, embedding permitted.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Northroader said:

I didn’t see any, but the “S” class had big brothers, the “V” and “VS” classes, which were totally magnificent engines, guaranteed to make you forget all about Swindon.

 

They would turn your thoughts Derby-wards. The Vs were closely based on the LMS Standard Compounds and the VS were simple versions of the same - not that many 3-cylinder simple 4-4-0s around, only the Schools (also Class V) spring to mind.

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13 hours ago, Northroader said:

I didn’t see any, but the “S” class had big brothers, the “V” and “VS” classes, which were totally magnificent engines, guaranteed to make you forget all about Swindon.

20AC0600-7A36-49D1-9740-FF925713B08F.jpeg.51f0efc00034a8a868d566083009611a.jpeg

Looks to me like Edward on steroids... :jester:

 

Hat, coat, etc...

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On 05/12/2021 at 10:03, Compound2632 said:

 

They would turn your thoughts Derby-wards. The Vs were closely based on the LMS Standard Compounds and the VS were simple versions of the same - not that many 3-cylinder simple 4-4-0s around, only the Schools (also Class V) spring to mind.

Don't forget the Gresley D49 "Hunts" and "Shires".

 

The "Shires were mainly the D49/1 type with Walschaerts valvegear and Gresley conjugation to the centre cylinder, while the D49/2 "Hunts" were the ones fitted with Lentz rotary cam operated poppet valves. There were 6 D49/3 "Shires" fitted with "Oscillating" cam operated Lentz poppet valves - but these were rebuilt to D49/1 spec relatively early in their lives.

 

Pity the Hornby "0" gauge No.2 Special D49s didn't carry any representation of the valvegear - but I would give one house room if one came my way at a reasonable price!

 

Regards

Chris H

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Chris, with you all the way with the D49s. Trouble was they were on a line which was well stocked with Pacifics, V2s, and even Atlantics, so did get a back seat on what duties were given. The GNRI Vs were at the top of the prestige work with no rivals, and even the Midland Compounds got top line jobs like the “Andy Capp Special”.

The ones I really liked were the ones with the Lentz Cam gear, a marvellous piece of engineering. You had a cam shaft which spanned the width of the engine, there were about five inlet cams for each cylinder, and these all flowed into each other, you couldn’t have steps as the camshaft moved sideways across the followers. The exhaust cams were just one profile, the beauty of being able to have the valve events separate. It was made from special hardened steel, with burnished surface. Then the valves were big double beat discs which you lapped in with paste, just like the valves on a motor bike decoke, only so much bigger. You can see the loco in totality at a railway station, but things like a Lentz camshaft were never appreciated generally.

 

 

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3 hours ago, Metropolitan H said:

Don't forget the Gresley D49 "Hunts" and "Shires".

 

I did, such things being well outside my circle of knowledge! I was intrigued to read that the D49/2 group were initially planned to be compounds on the Smith system, as originally used on the first Midland Smith-Johnson compounds and of course Smith's NER prototype No. 1619. Deeley eliminated any Smith patent features from the Midland Compounds, so they, the LMS Standard Compounds, and the Great Northern Class V compounds were Deeley Compounds.

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sp.
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Anyway, enough gallivanting around for now, I’d best get back to showing some modelling. At present, I’m typing under the handicap of watching dodgems swirling round on 40% of the area I’m typing on, thanks to some damned software change that happened a week ago, let’s hope it’s fixed soon.

One nettle that’s been grasped is pushing on with ballasting the track and texturing the platform surface area. The main material being used is old spent ballast gathered from previous versions, crunched up, and redistributed, with fresh added, including ballast from smaller scales, and sand. I’m trying to get a sort of grainy texture, of varying colours. Perhaps I should try Chris Nevard’s technique of working in modelling clay, which gives a very good appearance:http://nevardmedia.blogspot.com/2011/08/creating-effect-of-ash-ballast.html

Looking at it, I want to lighten the platform surface a bit more yet.

10DFFEF6-43D2-475F-9670-86B561293BCA.jpeg.529cee87bc7dbf297081daab307d574e.jpeg0C488DFD-FD27-42BF-AD07-36FE9CA925BE.jpeg.1e29e703f2e1b046acdf9e790b135c7c.jpeg

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IThe other job is a wagon kit I treated myself to at the trade fair the weekend before last. One from Gladiator, of a LNWR diagram 1 oneplank, with fixed sides and ends, which will be a useful addition to the general wagon pool. It’s made from a one piece resin casting, well detailed, then white metal casting additions, buffer housings, axlebox/ guard/spring assemblies, and brakegear, also wire loops for horse hooks. I invested in some new drills, as I had to drill out the buffer housings and the axleboxes. I don’t like superglue, I go for 24 hour Araldite for these parts, and checked that the wheels were touching down square on a flat surface all round before leaving it to set. The buffers are also glued in, rather than sprung. A piece of lead flashing was stuck under the floor to add some weight, and I’ve replaced the couplings with my own pattern having forward and backward facing slot and a single long link. The wagon has had a coat of Humbrol light grey primer.

8D66C4D8-2CFE-4468-8ADC-4DD5DDD0B5B9.jpeg.71956d60db4042a3ffe36632eaded34f.jpegFB7FDB8A-7F46-466D-93EA-D835FB1C8D7F.jpeg.e39777f8a2cda372bd4ad5bed9d47307.jpeg

 

The other happening the weekend before last was my daughter ringing to say she was bringing her family, plus my son, over this last weekend. (They’re all away over Christmas proper) So we ordered a load of goodies, and we had a family Christmas a fortnight early, which was very nice.

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