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Image restoration from pre-May 2021 continues and may take an indefinite period of time.

Train stuck in snow in Sweden


dmustu
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The train loco is a very much bog-standard SJ Rc6 1329, for-bearers of which (the Rc1) have been on Swedish rails since at least the 70's. The Austrians actually ordered a considerable series of a later model, also build under licence in Austria, quite a few of the later sub-series are still running there too. 

Not so sure about that.  Austria had just ten of the ASEA locomotives (class 1043), of which nine were returned to Sweden in 2001 (and added to the existing Rc2 fleet).  I'm not aware that ÖBB had home-built locos derived from them - which classes are you thinking of?  (On the other hand, there were numerous local derivatives in Romania and Yugoslavia).

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Thanks.

 

I'm not sure that the 1044 class was a licence build development of the 1043.  Though it did utilise the thyristor technology of the Swedish design, it was a larger and more powerful type with completely different styling (whereas those mentioned earlier from Romania and Yugoslavia closely resembled their Swedish prototypes).

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The crew of these had to be rescued by helicopter, as there was no access for miles. Judging by the angle that is where the photo was taken from!

 

snownews31wr.jpg

 

 

There is a pair of 26's in this picture somewhere....

 

snow26drift.jpg

Edited by Titan
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I remember seeing a similar image with a 33 in Kent somewhere.

More rotary snow ploughs is the answer.

 

Alas not really - rotaries are reputedly not particularly effective with what generally tends to be 'wet' snow in Britain and they would be even less happy with snow which has been through the typically British 'freeze/melt' daily cycles which tends to make it much more 'solid' than powder snow.  If they had ever had any chance of success there's no doubt that at least one British Pre-Group company would probably have gone in for a couple of them to deal with the very deep snow they repeatedly faced during winter - but they didn't.

 

NR of course have got one but it does not appear to be intended to operate in very deep snow

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For British conditions there is probably nothing that surpasses a couple of steam locos working back-to-back with a hefty snow plough fore and aft. Simple technology, less prone to seizure in cold weather or electrical failure compared to diesels.

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