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Oxford Rail GWR Dean Goods...


coachmann
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I was called out before I could finish post #1. It was tested on DC and ran smoothly with no hickups.  The Tender body was released by two small screws at the front end before unclipping the back end. There is an 8-pin decoder socket and what is probably a plastic folder for a small speaker.  This is an area I will have to study, as I prefer 645 decoders and larger cube speakers plus a stay-alive...

 

post-6680-0-85063500-1508417631_thumb.jpg

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Finally a sensible review! It looks as though Oxford have made some changes. Must raid the bank, as this certainly looks like a Dean Goods to me.......

 

I agree entirely. But I think that our's was balanced too!

 

https://srmg.org.uk/news-blog/2017/7/27/review-oxford-rail-00-dean-goods

 

To be honest - and this is a subjective thing I accept - I didn't like the original livery and am looking forward to the GWR Green release shortly. It does look good in black however, and the changes made are most welcome.

 

Tony

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Thanks, Larry, and very nice pics. It does confirm Oxford has changed the cabside cutout and possibly the washout positions as a result of its 'robust exchange of views' with the NRM. Some removal of extraneous rivets with a scalpel would improve the the loco body even further, and Oxford's firebox waist depiction is now closer to a typical late-DG state. The 2500g tender looks excellent, as noted in the previous threads.

 

(Although whether any actually survived into BR black behind a DG is another matter.)

 

The only 2500g in BR black behind a DG I am currently aware of is:

http://www.alangeorge.co.uk/Images/DeanGoods_2538_MerthyrStation_May12th1956_img281_TrevorSnell.jpg
 

Edited by Miss Prism
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Thanks, Larry, and very nice pics. It does confirm Oxford has changed the cab and the washout positions as a result of its 'robust exchange of views' with the NRM. Some removal of extraneous rivets with a scalpel would improve the the loco body even further, and Oxford's firebox waist depiction is now closer to a typical late-DG state. The non-standard 15'2" driver wheelbase remains problematic for wider gauge conversion though unless a bespoke chassis and rod etch appears, and that is the factor that will probably preclude me buying one, even at the tempting price. The 2500g tender looks excellent, as noted in the previous threads. (Although whether any actually survived into BR black behind a DG is another matter.)

Thanks. From what I can detect from photos of the real 2538 and 2516, they had small tenders pretty well identical to the one on the BR model, although there could be detail differences I cannot see. This tender would look neat behind Dukedogs 9016 and 9026 with new cab end handrails to suit the wider loco. 

 

The coal is on a separate removable molding, which is handy if one wants to cut away the coal well to give more space for DCC sound decoders and speaker etc...

post-6680-0-46188100-1508423986.jpg

 

On a slightly different topic, it occurs to me there should be enough 'meat' on the cabside  to form the higher cutout as found on 2538 etc. One reason for saying this is I bought in plates for this particular loco and had been working on some lamp brackets for mounting on the sandboxes. 

Edited by coachmann
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From my limited observations of a few pictures the Dean Goods they had a smokebox number in later BR days.  Did all the survivors receive smokebox numbers?

 

Thanks in anticipation

 

Ray

 

 

I think there is a post on " the other " thread which states that  some ,being at the end of their working lives in early BR days,did not carry a smokebox number plate..In which case why no painted GWR number on buffer beam which I would have thought it would still have been showing ...any thoughts on that ? I suppose you could add an etched plate if you wanted.

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The splashers are plastic mouldings, clipped to the metal running plate. Anyone who is bothered by the rivets on the bottom edge of the splashers should be able to removed them quite easily with just a minor repaint of the splasher front needed afterwards. (CJL)

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The splashers are plastic mouldings, clipped to the metal running plate. Anyone who is bothered by the rivets on the bottom edge of the splashers should be able to removed them quite easily with just a minor repaint of the splasher front needed afterwards. (CJL)

I've just checked and they are more than just clipped in place. They must be glued.

Edited by coachmann
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I think there is a post on " the other " thread which states that  some ,being at the end of their working lives in early BR days,did not carry a smokebox number plate..In which case why no painted GWR number on buffer beam which I would have thought it would still have been showing ...any thoughts on that ? I suppose you could add an etched plate if you wanted.

Probably because there was no point in the cost of casting a numberplate and then making the mounting brackets to fix it to a locomotive which had such a short time remaining.

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I've just checked and they are more than just clipped in place. They must be glued.

 

I took a razor saw to a set but they parted company with the running plate before I'd cut halfway through them. They probably are glued, as are most of the fittings on the running plate - the sandboxes and the rear handrails, for instance. All these separate parts, glued in place, and folk wonder why models cost what they do. (CJL)

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Much thanks to Coachman for his detailed description.

 

New plan for the weekend. I may leak some cash and buy a black version, remove the BR emblem and give a light blow over of green to give a worn look. I have some plates in stock. Probably not the correct numbers for the tender, but hey, it's my trainset.

 

Mike Wiltshire

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Nice job, but which Oxford Dean did you start with?

 

Here is a view of the pre-production sample of 2409, https://hattonsimages.blob.core.windows.net/products/OR76DG002XS_3235499_Qty1_cat2.jpg, and shows the same tooling as found on the production model of 2309. It is different from the 2409 you have. 

 

Yours appears to have an improved cab-side profile and handrails that are not in conflict with the wash-out plugs (albeit still non-radial from the look of things).  This suggests that your model benefits from the improved tooling brought in to satisfy the NRM in relation to the Locomotion limited edition.

 

It is certainly different from, and a marked improvement upon, the tooling used on the fully-lined 2309.  Is your model a standard range BR black model?  If so, Oxford have produced a version that would require much less radical treatment than the initial release to get it to the state shown in your posts, and this is surely very good news. 

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Nice job, but which Oxford Dean did you start with?

 

Here is a view of the pre-production sample of 2409, https://hattonsimages.blob.core.windows.net/products/OR76DG002XS_3235499_Qty1_cat2.jpg, and shows the same tooling as found on the production model of 2309. It is different from the 2409 you have. 

 

Yours appears to have an improved cab-side profile and handrails that are not in conflict with the wash-out plugs (albeit still non-radial from the look of things).  This suggests that your model benefits from the improved tooling brought in to satisfy the NRM in relation to the Locomotion limited edition.

 

It is certainly different from, and a marked improvement upon, the tooling used on the fully-lined 2309.  Is your model a standard range BR black model?  If so, Oxford have produced a version that would require much less radical treatment than the initial release to get it to the state shown in your posts, and this is surely very good news. 

I made it clear in my intro that the images were of a model 'straight out of the box'.  It appears this version is what you get when ordering the BR black version. I also said it benefited from earlier feedback from RMweb members and NRM Shildon, ie: different and improved cab-side cutout and higher washout plugs.  I believe Oxford said it could not cost-effectively remove the rivets on the splasher beading.

 

Rivets remain in top of the splashers, but they were there on some locos anyway at some point in their lives. So far I have not come across these rivets on locos in BR days, but unless I decide to remove the splashers from the running plate (I doubt I will to be honest), then I will live with the rivets. I suspect that trying to remove them while in situ will not be wholly successful.......This area reflects light and so the splasher top really needs to be sanded down afterwards in order to restore its surface.

 

Finally, I now believe the alternative cabside cutout could be formed with care and new beading added from 5thou styrene sheet. Again, this is on my mind if only because I bought plates for 2538. A planned trip to Llangollen has been scuppered by lousy weather and so anything could happen on my workbench today...  :biggrin_mini2:

Edited by coachmann
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