Jump to content

Gladiator WW2 Railgun


Garethp8873
 Share

Recommended Posts

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold

 

At only twice the price and in N scale. DC powered.

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold

Gosh,

Its war in slow motion. The enemy with Binoculars has at least a 30 minute warning of "incoming"... needn't rush their breakfast.

 

Watching that video, I understand where the National Debt came from, any why WW2 took 6 years.

You'd need at least 100 of them to make any impact.

If you were the crew working on that thing, it'd look good on your CV but you'd have some explaining to do, to rank and file soldiers to convince them of your war credentials.

Edited by adb968008
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Of course, when I think through which one to buy, it cannot be justified on an SECR layout, it would only be assembled on the western front (unless someone digs up evidence that they were test fired on Sheppy island). The WW2 version, fits in with all my WWII collection. Some of the German rail guns survive in preservation (trophies of war) but none of the UK ones survived (except the odd gun itself).

 

 

The 18" barrel was doing service on Grain ranges prewar.

 

One still left at Fort Nelson

a5b4704a81ac9b8be2dc2fe83f3f1af6--portsm

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

I suspect Oxford did their homework with regard to how many of these Lima sold. Despite being 'HO' and having European couplings, it was offered in the UK and was reviewed in Model Railway Constructor. Not all railway modellers have a layout set in a particular place/time so that they have to 'justify' every purchase in some way. Many simply run what they like, and that's where the gun will score - something to impress the grandchildren when they visit! (CJL)

post-1062-0-10814500-1516745051_thumb.jpg

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

Time will tell whether or not it sells.

 

£50 for something that looks a lot bigger and more complex than a Warwell or a coach. Looks great value. Many Military modellers in Braille scale will surely snap at least one up for no other reason than adding one to the collection. Contrary to popular belief, we don,t like everything to be uniform, ship shape and Bristol fashion.

 

I respect that this won,t fit into many people's layouts, it would be like adding a class 68 to mine. I have no problems someone making making 68s and people buying them, however I will not buy a 68 because it does appeal to my railway interests. On the other hand, this gun does.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

As a practical model for running on a layout, the 9.2in guns are probably better, being smaller and not needing to be dismounted in order to run on the mainline.

 

Presumably the carriage could run on the mainline even if at low speed and under out of gauge conditions.

Perhaps in a train with gun set wagons to carry the barrel, and I think I remember reading somewhere that you need a couple of large rail cranes to then mount the barrel.

 

I wonder if Bachmann have put them up to this so they can sell more of their new rail cranes, if the barrel easily lifts off the carriage you will know I am right.  :jester:

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Premium

with the N Hobbytrain model trotting out again I won't be surprised if Hornby International don't re-issue the ex Lima K5 again as it's been in the catalogue on and off for years with just a neater paint job. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

They seem to have done a pretty good job of flattening Calais: it's very easy to see the limits of their range, as there are older buildings surviving. If you drive south-west out of Calais via Sangatte towards Wimille, you pass the 'Dover Patrol' memorial at Cap Blanc-Nez; turn off and park here, and look around. The whole area is pitted with shell craters from the Kent guns.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Presumably the carriage could run on the mainline even if at low speed and under out of gauge conditions.

Perhaps in a train with gun set wagons to carry the barrel, and I think I remember reading somewhere that you need a couple of large rail cranes to then mount the barrel.

 

I wonder if Bachmann have put them up to this so they can sell more of their new rail cranes, if the barrel easily lifts off the carriage you will know I am right.  :jester:

The British rail guns were within the loading gauge.

 

The 18" barrel was doing service on Grain ranges prewar.

 

One still left at Fort Nelson

a5b4704a81ac9b8be2dc2fe83f3f1af6--portsm

The 18 inch gun in the photo is a different weapon to Bosh Buster which was a 18 inch Howitzer. I believe the rail mounting it is on was to transport it, it is too light for firing. There were a few of these monster 18 in guns built for a planned battleship but the Washington treaty meant the battleships had smaller guns, I think something like 15 inch.

Link to post
Share on other sites

They seem to have done a pretty good job of flattening Calais: it's very easy to see the limits of their range, as there are older buildings surviving. If you drive south-west out of Calais via Sangatte towards Wimille, you pass the 'Dover Patrol' memorial at Cap Blanc-Nez; turn off and park here, and look around. The whole area is pitted with shell craters from the Kent guns.

 

Quite good pathe news clips about Dover under fire during WW2 try "hellfire corner 1944", also some good clips "Railway guns 1940" I use youtube.

 

If I research anything WW2 now always try pathe clips, I've been going though a lot of North West Europe 44-45, amazing what you can discover, especially interesting finding out that quite a lot of military books have incorrect information such as a certain armour fighting variants etc never saw combat, only to see on film such vechiles fireing on German lines.

 

Going back to "Railway guns" 1940, I think they are 9.5 inch howitzers now they would make an interesting model

Link to post
Share on other sites

Gosh,

Its war in slow motion. The enemy with Binoculars has at least a 30 minute warning of "incoming"... needn't rush their breakfast.

 

Watching that video, I understand where the National Debt came from, any why WW2 took 6 years.

You'd need at least 100 of them to make any impact.

If you were the crew working on that thing, it'd look good on your CV but you'd have some explaining to do, to rank and file soldiers to convince them of your war credentials.

No large gun has a rapid rate of fire, with each shell being 1,250 lbs things are not going to be fast.

 

With a range of 40,000 yards (that is a tad over 22 1/2 miles) the 13.5 inch guns were not going to be seen even with the best Zeiss made binoculars.

 

I suppose bombarding the enemy held coast line while the army was practicing to invade the same coast line wasn't something your Royal Marine gunner would not be proud of. But then he did go off and either man a landing craft or crew a gun on the invasion fleet when the Royal Marines gave the army back their guns.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Quite good pathe news clips about Dover under fire during WW2 try "hellfire corner 1944", also some good clips "Railway guns 1940" I use youtube.

 

If I research anything WW2 now always try pathe clips, I've been going though a lot of North West Europe 44-45, amazing what you can discover, especially interesting finding out that quite a lot of military books have incorrect information such as a certain armour fighting variants etc never saw combat, only to see on film such vechiles fireing on German lines.

 

Going back to "Railway guns" 1940, I think they are 9.5 inch howitzers now they would make an interesting model

I seem to recall they are 12 inch howitzers, Jon Hall has a thread on scratchbuilding one.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I seem to recall they are 12 inch howitzers, Jon Hall has a thread on scratchbuilding one.

My fault, have a picture somewhere which states they are 9.5" but other sources state 12", following the thread as well, might try building one myself

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The British rail guns were within the loading gauge.

 

The 18 inch gun in the photo is a different weapon to Bosh Buster which was a 18 inch Howitzer. I believe the rail mounting it is on was to transport it, it is too light for firing. There were a few of these monster 18 in guns built for a planned battleship but the Washington treaty meant the battleships had smaller guns, I think something like 15 inch.

I believe the 18" naval guns built for the large light cruiser Furious were different to the 18" rail howitzer. Three BL were built and saw service in WW1. They were designed to be adaptable for land use and they ended up in artillery ranges or being used to develop new shells for a while I think. Their range was much longer than the 18" rail howitzer entered service several years after the naval gun, was lighter and had a shorter range. The Washington treaty limit for battleship guns was 16" (hence Rodney & Nelson), the British later tried to reduce this to 14", hence the main armament of the KG V battleships.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The British rail guns were within the loading gauge.

 

 

The 18 inch gun in the photo is a different weapon to Bosh Buster which was a 18 inch Howitzer. I believe the rail mounting it is on was to transport it, it is too light for firing. There were a few of these monster 18 in guns built for a planned battleship but the Washington treaty meant the battleships had smaller guns, I think something like 15 inch.

The photo seems to be an 18 in howitzer https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/BL_18_inch_railway_howitzer

 

Concerning RN 18 inch, 3 18in guns were made for HMS Furious in WW1. Only one was mounted before she was converted to an Aircraft carrier. 2 were used in monitors (coastal bombardment ships) in special limited mounts (ROF 4 minutes as design, 2.38 minutes in practice). This weapon was a scaled up 15 in naval gun. All three are known to have been scrapped in 1933 and 1947.

The Washington treaty cancelled N3 battleships, would have used another design of 18 in gun. Three test guns were ordered but all were cancelled as per treaty rules. This was Similar in design to the 16in (the maximum calibre allowed by Washington) carried by HMS Nelson and HMS Rodney built in the late 1920s.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The photo seems to be an 18 in howitzer https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/BL_18_inch_railway_howitzer

 

Concerning RN 18 inch, 3 18in guns were made for HMS Furious in WW1. Only one was mounted before she was converted to an Aircraft carrier. 2 were used in monitors (coastal bombardment ships) in special limited mounts (ROF 4 minutes as design, 2.38 minutes in practice). This weapon was a scaled up 15 in naval gun. All three are known to have been scrapped in 1933 and 1947.

The Washington treaty cancelled N3 battleships, would have used another design of 18 in gun. Three test guns were ordered but all were cancelled as per treaty rules. This was Similar in design to the 16in (the maximum calibre allowed by Washington) carried by HMS Nelson and HMS Rodney built in the late 1920s.

Hi

 

According to Ian Hogg in his book British and American Artillery of World War 2 he states after examining the Shoeburyness gun, "It is shorter, has trunnions, and has a old type three motion breach". Looks I was off target with my 18 inch battleship gun but the gun that was at Shoeburyness  is not the same as Bosh Buster.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I suspect Oxford did their homework with regard to how many of these Lima sold. Despite being 'HO' and having European couplings, it was offered in the UK and was reviewed in Model Railway Constructor. Not all railway modellers have a layout set in a particular place/time so that they have to 'justify' every purchase in some way. Many simply run what they like, and that's where the gun will score - something to impress the grandchildren when they visit! (CJL)

 

Yes, this is the sort of thing that could sell well in the train set market. It's certainly priced at a level which would support that.

 

Plus, of course, this does have an obvious crossover with Oxford Diecast's own military range. Someone modelling that setting could easily justify adding a short length of track in order to have one of these as a static model.

 

In this context, it's important to bear in mind that Oxford Rail is an extension the existing Oxford Diecast, unlike Bachmann and Hornby it isn't a purely rail-focussed brand. So that maybe gives Oxford more scope to look at potential crossovers between different segments of its product range. They've already dipped a toe in that with the Warwells - both the version with a tank load and the version with a road roller load are directly related to other distinct catalogue categories, for example. It wouldn't surprise me at all to see Oxford Rail come up with more products that link to their other ranges in the same way. I'd buy an NER agricultural implement wagon with a suitable load!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Premium

Update email from Oxford Rail:

Hello from Oxford Rail,

Following our email release yesterday we have two price updates on the OR76BOOM01 and XS versions. Please find updated details below, apologies for any inconvenience.

 

 

OR76BOOM01 WWI Boche Buster - Camouflage and ROD2330

Scale: 1:76

Retail Price: £169.95

Barcode: 5055530130470

 

OR76BOOM01XS WWI Boche Buster - Camouflage and ROD2330 DCC Sound

Scale: 1:76

Retail Price: £279.95

Barcode: 5055530130487

 

OR76BOOM02 Railgun Gladiator WWII Railgun

Scale: 1:76

Retail Price: £49.95

Barcode: 5055530130494

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

My fault, have a picture somewhere which states they are 9.5" but other sources state 12", following the thread as well, might try building one myself

No fault, both weapons looked similar as like all early 20th century artillery there was a gun and its partner howitzer. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

The subject header should be edited as by the below mail from Oxford state that 2 releases for WW1 and the gun on its own in WW2 guise (albeit a different name).

 

Update email from Oxford Rail:

Hello from Oxford Rail,

Following our email release yesterday we have two price updates on the OR76BOOM01 and XS versions. Please find updated details below, apologies for any inconvenience.

 

 

OR76BOOM01 WWI Boche Buster - Camouflage and ROD2330

Scale: 1:76

Retail Price: £169.95

Barcode: 5055530130470

 

OR76BOOM01XS WWI Boche Buster - Camouflage and ROD2330 DCC Sound

Scale: 1:76

Retail Price: £279.95

Barcode: 5055530130487

 

OR76BOOM02 Railgun Gladiator WWII Railgun

Scale: 1:76

Retail Price: £49.95

Barcode: 5055530130494

 

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...