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Jim Stringer / Andrew Martin Mysteries?


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I recently learned about these Jim Stringer mysteries by Andrew Martin. I just received my first copy -- Murder at Deviation Junction -- today. Just wondering if many other folks have read these and what your thoughts are? Apparently, they're loaded with accurate railway details, set in the early-1900s.

 

Thanks!

 

Rob

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I recently learned about these Jim Stringer mysteries by Andrew Martin. I just received my first copy -- Murder at Deviation Junction -- today. Just wondering if many other folks have read these and what your thoughts are? Apparently, they're loaded with accurate railway details, set in the early-1900s.

 

Thanks!

 

Rob

Hi Rob,

 

I've read most of them (but not that one!) and I think they're terrific; very atmospheric and detailed, and a cracking detective story as well.

Enjoy!

Dave.T

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Hi Rob,

 

I've read most of them (but not that one!) and I think they're terrific; very atmospheric and detailed, and a cracking detective story as well.

Enjoy!

Dave.T

 

Thanks, Dave -- that's what I've heard as well. Just as I enjoy watching a good "train movie" I'm hoping I will enjoy a great railway-themed mystery novel. I used to really enjoy mysteries as a kid and teen, so I'm hoping these books will get me back into this type of book. I usually don't read much fiction these days.

 

Rob

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Rob,

 

 

 

 

Yes, I'd agree with Dave, they're a good read, very atmospheric, and, though I'm no expert on railways around 1900, the railway details ring true.  I've read all four novels and probably enjoyed Murder at Deviation Junction the most. 

 

Arthur

 

 

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The Bobby Dazzlers, one of his earlier, pre-Jim Stringer books, is also very enjoyable - and inclues some train-related stuff (nasty incident at a marshalling yard - the word "bacon slicer" having particularly gruesome significance).

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They're very well written - accurate as far as I acn tell (1900-14 is not my era, neither is the NER my area), but that aside, they're a cracking good detective novel - surely someone will take them up for a tv series?

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Rob,

 

 

 

 

Yes, I'd agree with Dave, they're a good read, very atmospheric, and, though I'm no expert on railways around 1900, the railway details ring true.  I've read all four novels and probably enjoyed Murder at Deviation Junction the most.  Arthur

They're very well written - accurate as far as I acn tell (1900-14 is not my era, neither is the NER my area), but that aside, they're a cracking good detective novel - surely someone will take them up for a tv series?

0

 

 

Thanks, John & Arthur ... 1900-14 is still too early for what I model and also a different region too. But I'm still really interested in reading these books because they're about steam engines and I still enjoy the northeast (Yorkshire) parts of England as well.

 

I mainly model the S&DJR in in the 1950s/60s, but have enough stock to also the S&DJR in the 1920s & '30s. The buildings on my layout, colours, etc., depict an S&DJR station of the 1950s/60s. However, I also have enough locos & coaches to occasionally run some 1930s LNER trains! :O

 

It sounds like they would also work well as a TV series (or even a few movies?). I wonder which heritage railway(s) they would film them at?

 

Cheers, Rob

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Rob,

 

 

 

Yes, I'd agree with Dave, they're a good read, very atmospheric, and, though I'm no expert on railways around 1900, the railway details ring true. I've read all four novels and probably enjoyed Murder at Deviation Junction the most.

 

Arthur

 

 

I spotted a new one in Waterstones the other day, but I can't remember the title.

Dave.

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The latest one is Last Train To Scarborough.

 

If I remember correctly, the others are:

 

The Necropolis Railway

The Blackpool Highflyer

The Lost Luggage Porter

Murder at Deviation Junction

Death on a Branch Line.

 

All very well written and highly recommednded.

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They're very well written - accurate as far as I acn tell (1900-14 is not my era, neither is the NER my area), but that aside, they're a cracking good detective novel - surely someone will take them up for a tv series?

I quite enjoyed them- I can imagine that any TV series based on them would bring forth scores of postings on here about the inevitable inaccuracies and anachronisms.

The protagonist seems to have got about a fair bit; in the Necropolis story, he worked for the LSWR, on the Blackpool Flyer, the L&YR, and then for the NER in Last Train to Scarborough (or was he just piloted by an NER driver in that?).

This sort of semi-historical crime fiction seems to be quite vogueish at the moment- there's a French series set in about the same period, based around a bookseller's, but with some railway content.

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