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GER 10T Goods Van announced!


Garethp8873
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GER 10T Goods Van announced. Three examples have been announced:

 

OR76GEGV001 Great Eastern GER 10t Covered Van No.32109
OR76GEGV002 NE GER 10t Covered Van No.630616
OR76GEGV003 BR GER 10t Covered Van No.E612630

 

I look forward to this entry.

Edited by Garethp8873
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Do we know anything about this one? What diagram is it/when would it have been introduced?

Edit: Photo from the Oxford Rail Facebook page:
 

82596438_2517196161826019_42739496287238

I'll admit to not being a GER wagon expert, so any info would be much appreciated.

Edited by Skinnylinny
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The first railway wagon that I was ever 'close up and personal to' in 1:1 scale was of this type. It had been left behind when Commercial Road Goods Depot (London ex-LT&SR) was closed.

 

IIRC, D&S Models made a very nice 4mm scale kit for one of these in whitemetal some decades ago.

 

Martin

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Looking in LNER Wagons Vol.1, the first wagon they're looking at is 32109 (incorrectly 23109 on their listing) which is a timber framed example to GER Diagram 78/W.

 

630616 is to 47/S and E612630 I can't find info for... these two I assume are steel framed examples.

 

*Update* received a message on Facebook that they are aware of the 32109 error and it is correct in the catalogue.

Edited by Garethp8873
32109 is of the 78/W diagram and not a 72/S diagram
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A very nice choice, these were distinctive and attractive wagons which the GE produced in numbers over a lengthy period. They were long lived and came in both fitted and unfitted versions. A GE 20t brake of the period would be a good companion to these and a trio of TK/ BTK/ CK 50' corridor coaches would be a welcome addition as well.

 

The underframes on these were quite slender and I hope that Oxford do them justice but I think I might hang on to my D&S kits for a while yet, just in case!

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I'd really been hoping for an LMS van of some kind, but I've got plenty of kits to go at, so no complaints from me- If they do a decent job, I'll be in the market for a couple of these- you really can't have enough pre-grouping wagons...

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2 minutes ago, truffy said:

 

If these could've made their way to the SR, I may well have a couple.

 

The East London line is your friend

 

Seriously - the SR generally supplied only a modest proportion of the vehicles in its own goods trains, thanks to the Common User arrangements. A common type of van on the LNER (the second largest wagon fleet in the country) would certainly have ended up on the SR, especially as the London docks were basically served by the GE

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8 minutes ago, TrainMan2001 said:

Does anyone know if these would have ended up anywhere near Barrow? They certainly are very nice looking wagons.

 

Again , in principle they might well have done under Common User arrangements. LNER Wagons includes photos taken at Stewarts Lane ex SECR in 1937 and Dunbar in 1946

 

There were 3200 of them left in 1938, and 2700 left in Dec 1947

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8 hours ago, Garethp8873 said:

GER 10T Goods Van announced. Three examples have been announced:

 

OR76GEGV001 Great Eastern GER 10t Covered Van No.32109
OR76GEGV002 NE GER 10t Covered Van No.630616
OR76GEGV003 BR GER 10t Covered Van No.E612630

 

I look forward to this entry.

 

With a rrp of only £15 these could be a good seller for OR.

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8 hours ago, Skinnylinny said:

Do we know anything about this one? What diagram is it/when would it have been introduced?

Edit: Photo from the Oxford Rail Facebook page:
 

82596438_2517196161826019_42739496287238

I'll admit to not being a GER wagon expert, so any info would be much appreciated.

 

 

No location given, but the fencing and glimpse of a signal box on the far right suggest an ex MR line to me

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Already seeing what other liveries are possible for these vans... post-36 as well as fitted examples are possible too...

  

1 hour ago, gwrrob said:

 

With a rrp of only £15 these could be a good seller for OR.

 

I think so too but providing they are well done.

  

1 hour ago, truffy said:

 

If these could've made their way to the SR, I may well have a couple.

 

These were well travelled so I don't see why not :)

Edited by Garethp8873
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9 hours ago, Bucoops said:

If they do a decent job of it I'll have a few :)

 

That was my thinking. Hopefully they've learnt from the basic errors that blighted a few of the earlier models.

 

For those wondering about uses, if I'm thinking of the right vans then I believe that quite a few of these ended up as departmental stock.

 

 

 

Jason

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Nobody's been explicit about which diagram this is, unless I've missed something, but I take it this is the 19'0" long  type of which 1,794 were built 1911-1923, GER diagram 72? The fly in the ointment there is that the GE number given, 32109, belongs to one of the batch of 100 wood-framed vans built by the Gloucester RC&W Co. in 1920, GER diagram 78 [P. Tatlow, LNER Wagons Vol. 1 (Wild Swan, 2005) p. 206].

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30 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

Nobody's been explicit about which diagram this is, unless I've missed something, but I take it this is the 19'0" long  type of which 1,794 were built 1911-1923, GER diagram 72? The fly in the ointment there is that the GE number given, 32109, belongs to one of the batch of 100 wood-framed vans built by the Gloucester RC&W Co. in 1920, GER diagram 78 [P. Tatlow, LNER Wagons Vol. 1 (Wild Swan, 2005) p. 206].

 

I think a different running number is given on the Oxford site. 

 

Yes, I suspect we might end up with the later 19' vans, rather than the 19'3" versions of 1903. 

 

Anyway, joking aside, it's a welcome and commendable choice by Oxford.  The GE version would have given the Model Rail C53/J70 something to pull if they'd produced it in a pre-Grouping livery.  After pooling, it can go anywhere, of course. 

 

We shall have to wait to see what exactly we get and how it turns out. 

 

Whether Jenny's comment that this will be a first pre-Grouping van in pre-Grouping livery will hold good depends, I suppose, of whether Rails release their ex-SE&CR van in SE&CR guise. 

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8 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

Nobody's been explicit about which diagram this is, unless I've missed something, but I take it this is the 19'0" long  type of which 1,794 were built 1911-1923, GER diagram 72? The fly in the ointment there is that the GE number given, 32109, belongs to one of the batch of 100 wood-framed vans built by the Gloucester RC&W Co. in 1920, GER diagram 78 [P. Tatlow, LNER Wagons Vol. 1 (Wild Swan, 2005) p. 206].

 

I think someone has already said upstream in this thread that Oxford have stated that 32109 is a typo in the publicity material and the released version will have a correct number.

 

I'm not too bothered about which actual GER diagram it is so long as it's a reasonably accurate model of it. What would be even nicer is a rake of three with different numbers.

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10 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

Nobody's been explicit about which diagram this is, unless I've missed something, but I take it this is the 19'0" long  type of which 1,794 were built 1911-1923, GER diagram 72? The fly in the ointment there is that the GE number given, 32109, belongs to one of the batch of 100 wood-framed vans built by the Gloucester RC&W Co. in 1920, GER diagram 78 [P. Tatlow, LNER Wagons Vol. 1 (Wild Swan, 2005) p. 206].

 

Well, this is as far as I've got!

 

Neither of the running numbers quoted for the GER version makes any sense, but the LNER version, according to Tatlow, suggests the earlier diagram of 1903.

 

But, frankly, Oxford is not known for its research capabilities, so who knows!

 

 

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