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The BRM Guide to DCC Decoders

 

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The concept of ‘going digital’ is no longer something new, yet there’s still a widespread lack of knowledge when it comes to decoder options. It has to be the second most-asked question, closely following “Which DCC system should I use?” Just as there isn’t a ‘one-size fits all’ DCC controller, the same can be said for decoders, though many modellers are left confused by what they require and the suitability of a decoder for a particular locomotive.

 

Read more - https://www.world-of-railways.co.uk/Techniques/dc-dcc/the-brm-guide-to-dcc-decoders

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Building a 16mm scale Slater's War Department Railway D Type wagon

 

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Built in very large numbers and with the minimum of variations between the builds, the D type bogie wagon was produced during World War 1 by numerous builders including Robert Hudson and the Gloucester Wagon Company.

 

After the conflict ended, wagons were repatriated and found their way to numerous railway lines, some surviving into the preservation era.

 

Slater's kit is produced in a mix of injection moulded plastic and brass castings. 33cm long and just under 9cm wide, it's a substantial model, but one that can be assembled in a couple of leisurely evenings. Levels of detail are designed to match the firm's locomotive kits but the construction seems robust enough for normal garden railway use.

 

Find out how to construct one here - https://www.world-of-railways.co.uk/Techniques/Kit-building/building-a-16mm-scale-slaters-war-department-railway-d-type-wagon

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How to cosmetically improve track points

 

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In our latest practical feature, we turn our attention to enhancing the appearance of this most standard element of model railway infrastructure.

 

The main objective is to improve the points appearance by removing the spring block, thus making the sleepers look more prototypical, and to enhance the point changing operation. The strength of spring was causing the actuator rod to bend slightly, mainly due to the thickness of my baseboards.

 

Find out more here - https://www.world-of-railways.co.uk/Techniques/Track/model-railways-how-to-cosmetically-improve-track-points

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5 ways to improve the reliability of your layout

 

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A reliable layout is a fun one to operate. With time on your hands, we've put together a few ideas to help you fettle your model to make it run like a Swiss watch.

 

Read more here - https://www.world-of-railways.co.uk/Techniques/Track/5-ways-to-improve-the-reliability-of-your-layout

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How to fit a DCC uncoupler

 

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Uncoupling locomotives from rolling stock can at times prove frustrating, particularly as the standard - yet notoriously tricky to uncouple - tension-lock coupling appears to be here for the foreseeable future. Those with shunting layouts will encounter the problem more-often than large layouts with express trains that can be uncoupled behind the scenes, unseen by the scrupulous yet judgemental eyes of the exhibition-goer. If smooth operation is the key to success on our models, surely there’s an easier way to perform the basic task of separating locomotives from stock?

 

Read more here -  https://www.world-of-railways.co.uk/Techniques/dc-dcc/how-to-fit-a-dcc-uncoupler

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Brush Painting – Top Tips

 

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Painting models isn’t like painting emulsion on your walls at home. The model must be clean, the spread of paint must be even and the way it's applied must be methodical. Many a model can be brush-painted, though with the latest RTR models having such an excellent finish, it is best respraying these with an airbrush if a repaint is required.

 

Read more here https://www.world-of-railways.co.uk/wor/techniques/model-railways-brush-painting-top-tips/

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Using Weathering Powders – Top Tips

 

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Weathering powders work best over a matt paint finish, hence if used on an RTR model, we’d advise a little airbrush work beforehand. Consider powders as a semi-permanent form of weathering. They will stay in-situ if left alone, but must be sealed if you intend to handle the model. Buildings aren’t much of a problem, but locomotive, coach or wagon sides should ideally be sealed with a quick spray of matt varnish paint.

 

Read more here - https://www.world-of-railways.co.uk/wor/techniques/model-railways-using-weathering-powders-top-tips/

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Wiring your model railway: top tips

 

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When it works, we ignore its existence, when it doesn’t, we can be tempted to lose all patience. Wiring is perhaps the railway modellers’ least favourite subject to become enthused about, but it’s a necessary requirement to permit all of our track-powered models to function.

 

Read more here - https://www.world-of-railways.co.uk/wor/techniques/wiring-your-model-railway-top-tips/

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Modelling Inspiration on RMweb - Our Top 5 Picks

 

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As Britain's modellers pull up the drawbridge, there's no shortage of activity on their workbenches, with some truly inspiring projects on show in our topic on RMweb. Here's our top five picks from this week.

 

Read more here - https://www.world-of-railways.co.uk/Techniques//modelling-inspiration-on-rmweb-our-top-5-picks

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Working with Plastic Sheet – Top Tips

 

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From buildings to wagons or locomotives, these sheets can be used to good effect on models, though the most common procedures used will be the cutting and gluing of parts. Attempting to cut plastic sheet to the uninitiated might require a learning curve because of its smooth nature and the tendency for a knife to slip if not used correctly.

 

Read more here - https://www.world-of-railways.co.uk/Techniques//model-railways-working-with-plastic-sheet-top-tips

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Using Pencils on Brickwork – Top Tips

 

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Unless you have a lot of spare time, or are building for Pendon, painting bricks on a model building individually isn't an option because of the time required. Some laser-cut bricks are too sharp-cornered for this technique to work effectively though, so test on an inconspicuous area first. The method works in all scales from N to O.

 

Read more here - https://www.world-of-railways.co.uk/Techniques//model-railways-using-pencils-on-brickwork-top-tips

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Making Holes – Top Tips

 

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Whether it’s wood or brass, quite often you’ll need to make a hole in a piece of work when making something. From small holes for handrails to large openings in chimneys, the methods will differ depending on the material you plan on cutting through.

One essential is a set of good quality drill bits, while a mini-drill is also a good investment. Here's our top tips.

 

Read more here - https://www.world-of-railways.co.uk/Techniques//model-railways-making-holes-top-tips

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Top tips to fighting dust on your model railway

 

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Don’t we all wish that our model creations, which we’ve slaved countless hours over, could access the fountain of eternal youth? Howard Smith provides ideas to combat the perennial problem of dust on our model railways, to ensure your layout remains clean.

 

Read more here - https://www.world-of-railways.co.uk/techniques//top-tips-to-fighting-dust-on-your-model-railway

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How to build a laser-cut signal box kit

 

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Signal boxes are an essential part of the railway scene, but it's not always easy to find the right one for your layout. Here we build a laser-cut kit from LCUT Creative - a fine addition for many layouts.

 

Read more here - https://www.world-of-railways.co.uk/Techniques/Kit-building//how-to-build-a-laser-cut-signal-box-kit

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