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Hornby: A Model World


Phil Parker
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1 hour ago, ruggedpeak said:

Hopefully they have added the "don't try this at home" warning to the web version!

 

Perhaps NR could put 50kv through the OHL and see what speed they can get out of 91! Need quite a lot of bubble wrap at the end though.

SNCF raised the line voltage when they were doing some speed trials and increased the loco wheel diameter.

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Just curious but during one of the links between features there was a glimpse of a B-B-B or Bo-Bo-Bo loco, in green and looking a little like the English Electric Type 3 and Type 4 designs.

 

Does anyone know what that was?

 

Thanks Steve

 

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Initially I wasnt too impressed with this series but it most definitely is growing on me . Enjoyed last weeks APT episode and this week . Whats emerging is not just a story of Hornby but the wider hobby taking in Pete Watermans WCML layout last week, the large O gauge layout week before, the Barn layout this week  . I think this is giving a better overall and more wideranging  view of the hobby than I initially thought . I certainly prefer it to the Great Model Railway Challenge which had all that false jeapardy , dinosaurs and sci fi , that I'm sorry but I just dont see on the majority of model railway layouts and was just not typical.  Glad to see Sams trains  because he is part of the hobby with 100k subscribers . I do wish he wouldnt do things like sticking 30v to a loco , but was it any worse than Pete Waterman attacking a wooden layout with a blow torch ?

 

It does appear that Simon Kohler is in charge of everything . Isnt there a separate brand manager for Airfix?  Maybe another bit of TV theatrics 

 

Definitely enjoyable telly !

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The 1/72 is nice model .I was commissioned a pilot and some ground types for it .I might even make it .I bought an after market canopy. I am also doing  some for a 109 from Airfix ,again a good model .A few years a ago I made a 1/48 Seafire for an elderly Spitfire fanatic .Its the first model aircraft I have made since my twenties so a learning curve again .

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3 hours ago, lapford34102 said:

The starter kit seen had no cockpit to speak of, the 72nd one does. He took a lot of cockpit shots.

 

I'd expect that Spitfire cockpit shots are useful in the Airfix photo library for future projects. While the photographer is there, you get him to shoot everything - getting him there is the expensive bit. Maybe there is another, large scale Spitfire planned for the future?

 

29 minutes ago, Legend said:

It does appear that Simon Kohler is in charge of everything . Isnt there a separate brand manager for Airfix?  Maybe another bit of TV theatrics 

 

The Hunter Simon had "decided to bring in", was bought by Lyndon personally, so yes, the whole thing is full of TV theatrics. However, in this instance the brand manager for Airfix and Humbrol passed away during the year the series took to shoot.

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23 minutes ago, Legend said:

Initially I wasnt too impressed with this series but it most definitely is growing on me . Enjoyed last weeks APT episode and this week . Whats emerging is not just a story of Hornby but the wider hobby taking in Pete Watermans WCML layout last week, the large O gauge layout week before, the Barn layout this week  . I think this is giving a better overall and more wideranging  view of the hobby than I initially thought . I certainly prefer it to the Great Model Railway Challenge which had all that false jeapardy , dinosaurs and sci fi , that I'm sorry but I just dont see on the majority of model railway layouts and was just not typical.  Glad to see Sams trains  because he is part of the hobby with 100k subscribers . I do wish he wouldnt do things like sticking 30v to a loco , but was it any worse than Pete Waterman attacking a wooden layout with a blow torch ?

 

It does appear that Simon Kohler is in charge of everything . Isnt there a separate brand manager for Airfix?  Maybe another bit of TV theatrics 

 

Definitely enjoyable telly !

Using a blowtorch on teddy bear fur is an established, if not well known, technique in the hands of experienced modellers. Connecting an unsuitable, potentially high voltage,  power supply onto bare rails isn't a good practise for anyone. That Sam is an" influencer" with 100k subscribers surely demands that he should act responsibly.

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Phil Parker said:

 

 

The Hunter Simon had "decided to bring in", was bought by Lyndon personally, so yes, the whole thing is full of TV theatrics. However, in this instance the brand manager for Airfix and Humbrol passed away during the year the series took to shoot.

 Thanks Phil . Really sorry to hear the brand manager passed away. I thought I remembered seeing someone in that position in the James May program when they unveiled the Hellcat . 

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11 minutes ago, Phil Parker said:

While the photographer is there, you get him to shoot everything - getting him there is the expensive bit.

 

Yes. It seems to be de rigeur in the narratives of this series for Hornby juniors to be sent out on expensive safaris, e.g. the somewhat absurd APT paint-matching episode. Possibly the TV company was paying for these visits.

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28 minutes ago, Jol Wilkinson said:

Using a blowtorch on teddy bear fur is an established, if not well known, technique in the hands of experienced modellers.

 

I'm not sure why people are getting in a state about the blowtorch/fur thing. Since the fur is nylon, when you heat it, it shrivels. The blowtorch just provides handy heat - there's no need to hit the fur with the flame, you just bring them close and there's enough heat to have the effect.

 

I put metal handrails into plastic bodies by poking the with a hot soldering iron - melting the plastic around the metal handrail and letting it pass into the body. Take the heat away, the plastic solidifies and grabs the handrail. The first few times, doing this is a little nerve-wracking (hint: practise on some plastic sheet and an old wagon) but you pretty quickly get the hang of it. I assume blow torching the scenery is the same thing.

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17 minutes ago, Miss Prism said:

 

Yes. It seems to be de rigeur in the narratives of this series for Hornby juniors to be sent out on expensive safaris, e.g. the somewhat absurd APT paint-matching episode. Possibly the TV company was paying for these visits.

 

But by doing the paint matching scene, you have a hook to take the viewer to the real APT and can tell the story. That's the point, not matching paint. With the shooting taking place over the last year, and the APT due to be delivered in 2020, it's likely that the paint decisions had already been taken before the scene was filmed.

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36 minutes ago, Jol Wilkinson said:

That Sam is an" influencer" with 100k subscribers surely demands that he should act responsibly.


I think “Influencer” and acting responsibly are mutually incompatible.

 

Cheers

 

Darius

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2 minutes ago, Darius43 said:


I think “Influencer” and acting responsibly are mutually incompatible.

 

Cheers

 

Darius

Seems to be par for the social media course......

The whole "Influencer" thing just seems to be full of nobodies passing on their dubious ideas as facts or recommendations for the gullible to follow.

And from that they get a blossoming career. What a strange world we live in.:scratchhead:

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9 minutes ago, Darius43 said:


I think “Influencer” and acting responsibly are mutually incompatible.

 

Cheers

 

Darius

In some sense yes, but there are people out there doing good content which is 'influencing' but also well produced.

 

Mrs Woodenhead and I are currently watching a channel on YouTube about solo hiking, young lady walking 230 miles on the Cape Wrath trail from Fort William to Cape Wrath.  There is definitely influencing going on, the food, the tent, the clothing etc but it's good stuff and she is doing the walk single handed, camping out at night, getting lost, getting wet.

 

It really all depends on the type of 'influencer' you watch or are drawn to and many are drawn to Sam.

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10 minutes ago, melmerby said:

Seems to be par for the social media course......

The whole "Influencer" thing just seems to be full of nobodies passing on their dubious ideas as facts or recommendations for the gullible to follow.

And from that they get a blossoming career. What a strange world we live in.:scratchhead:

 

Andrew Marr's Start the Week  show, BBC4 on Monday morning this week included a discussion about influencers (in the current sense). Apparently people do it because they can monetise their lifestyle. Apparently this appeals to those in Generation Z (look it up, I had to).

 

 

2 minutes ago, woodenhead said:

In some sense yes, but there are people out there doing good content which is 'influencing' but also well produced.

 

Mrs Woodenhead and I are currently watching a channel on YouTube about solo hiking, young lady walking 230 miles on the Cape Wrath trail from Fort William to Cape Wrath.  There is definitely influencing going on, the food, the tent, the clothing etc but it's good stuff and she is doing the walk single handed, camping out at night, getting lost, getting wet.

 

It really all depends on the type of 'influencer' you watch or are drawn to and many are drawn to Sam.

 

Which is perhaps an indication of how his followers perceive railway modelling.

 

Clearly there are some very positive influencers out there (David Attenborough springs to mind) and it could be said that much of anything we see in magazines, newspapers, on social media, tv, advertising, etc. is about influencing. Increasingly it seems that the influenced are less able to sort the wheat from the chaff, or has it always been so?

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8 minutes ago, Jol Wilkinson said:

Clearly there are some very positive influencers out there (David Attenborough springs to mind) and it could be said that much of anything we see in magazines, newspapers, on social media, tv, advertising, etc. is about influencing. Increasingly it seems that the influenced are less able to sort the wheat from the chaff, or has it always been so?

The young lady on the hike to Cape Wrath is clearly funded, she has patrons and at least some of the food had been provided by the company that produces it (albeit for a different video series about canoeing).  But on the other hand, if the result is watchable content I don't mind, she clearly has good skills, she understands hiking and is relatable.

 

Influencing is nothing new, it's just got easy as a result of social media for people without access to large amounts of funds or can control the media, which means all sorts of crackpots can spout all kinds of nonsense now and get a global audience which then attracts funds to do more of the same.

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1 hour ago, Jol Wilkinson said:

Connecting an unsuitable, potentially high voltage,  power supply onto bare rails isn't a good practise for anyone. That Sam is an" influencer" with 100k subscribers surely demands that he should act responsibly.

I think that extends to the programme makers as well. The commentary doesn't help!

 

948117233_Samstrains.jpg.16c153f45080e00c58156b13bf2b1203.jpg

 

Quite a good short clip for safety toolbox talks.

Edited by ruggedpeak
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31 minutes ago, LNER4479 said:

I was amused at how the fastest steam locomotive in the world was in fact No.4469 Gadwall and not Mallard at all?

 

Everyone in the world knows the fastest loco in the world is an original Smokey Joe. Everyone.... (except for 100,001 people).

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3 hours ago, melmerby said:

SNCF raised the line voltage when they were doing some speed trials and increased the loco wheel diameter.

This raises the obvious question as to whether anyone has put NOS into a diesel loco?

 

200mph Class 43?

150 mph Class 66?

:D

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53 minutes ago, Jol Wilkinson said:

Increasingly it seems that the influenced are less able to sort the wheat from the chaff, or has it always been so?

 

I like being influenced. RMweb is quite a good place for being influenced. The influences sometimes come from unexpected sources. But I'd like to think I am quite picky about who influences me. 

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2 hours ago, Jol Wilkinson said:

 Connecting an unsuitable, potentially high voltage,  power supply onto bare rails isn't a good practise for anyone. That Sam is an" influencer" with 100k subscribers surely demands that he should act responsibly.

 

 

 

I would be more concerned with the structural integrity of his roof. His "loft conversion" looks like unmodified trusses with boards laid on the bottom chord. Altering the imposed load of trusses is an accident waiting to happen. 

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