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Hornby: A Model World


Phil Parker
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"Lucky he doesn't do anything else dubious with electrics. Oh wait ......"

 

Hmmm:

  • A RailRoad loco run on a carpet and hooked up to a Variac.
  • Hornby and H&M branded controllers tested in "pyro - mode".
  • We mustn't forget a long line of "Smokey Joe" locos, used for "torture testing" the controllers. I can only hope he wasn't trying to get the "magic smoke".

 

I wonder exactly how many "wagging fingers" his Variac routine would get.

 

I could imagine Simon dreading what further "delights" this guy might have in store for products of brands he's been connected with.

 

 

"None of these controllers is going to burn down your house." Probably not - but certain experiments might.

 

I wonder about this guy's long term career plans - testing for manufacturers, perhaps - or, more likely, just a new series on Quest: "Don't Try This at Home, Kids!"

 

The mind boggles ... .

 

 

Huw.

 

 

 

Edited by Huw Griffiths
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10 minutes ago, Steamport Southport said:

Where's Bob Symes-Shutzmann when you need him? 

 

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Never mind playing with things you shouldn't be touching, he made a fully working Class 47.

 

They don't make model programmes like they used to do....

 

 

Ah, now you're talking.  I remember his TV programmes with much fondness.  Such a character.  His model of Horsted Keynes that featured in one or two (some?) of his programmes was one of those key sources of inspiration for me when I started out building my own model railways.

 

Pete T.

 

 

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8 hours ago, Georgeconna said:

I would of expected given the amount of Spits they have produced over the years a Trip anywhere would not be been needed.

 

I think theres an element of "made for television" about alot of what we see on this show, to create more of a storyline with how they seem to design things or do things there, I cant imagine the majority of imagery theyve been taking as theyve shown on tv has been that useful when back at base trying to translate it to a CAD program, they were struggling to hold the measuring stick even remotely level the other week whilst taking supposedly critical measurements, and you dont see reference images blown up to magnify the detail sat around their workstations, with them cross checking the detail, which Id have expected was a key review stage.

 

though its also probably just as useful for Hornby to get their younger designers up close and personal with the objects they are modelling,and gaining that experience & insight as part of developing their skillset, but that doesnt translate well onto screen, so they come up with this ruse that they really need to go see a train or a plane to take some new measurements or photos,video of it, and it then lets them fill in some background on the vehicle, why Hornby want to model it as a product etc, explain some detail or history about it, and before you know it youve made 5mins of content.

 

it does feel like the filler content is increasing week on week though at the moment.

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On 09/11/2021 at 00:00, NIK said:

Hi,

 

I was surprised to see a Hornby 4 VEP get an airing in the latest episode (in the part on the repair department). I think that section on getting the coach work repaired was edited as I found getting the body off the motor coach quite difficult especially with the short lead between the chassis and the roof. I was kind of pleased to see the Hornby technician broke something while trying to release the motor bogie from its mount.

 

as a trained technician in my youth, the one thing I expected him to really break holding that kind of flat headed screwdriver in the way he did as he tried to pry the fixing apart was likely to be his hand if the screwdriver suddenly slipped, its definitely not the technique to use or copy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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8 hours ago, stonojnr said:

 

as a trained technician in my youth, the one thing I expected him to really break holding that kind of flat headed screwdriver in the way he did as he tried to pry the fixing apart was likely to be his hand if the screwdriver suddenly slipped, its definitely not the technique to use or copy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have you contacted him to advise him? I'm sure he'd appreciate the benefit of your experience....

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11 hours ago, PJT said:

 

 

Ah, now you're talking.  I remember his TV programmes with much fondness.  Such a character.  His model of Horsted Keynes that featured in one or two (some?) of his programmes was one of those key sources of inspiration for me when I started out building my own model railways.

 

Pete T.

 

 

Sadly deceased ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Symes ); I remember the Brush 4, which had a 'Taplin Twin' engine driving the generator. He intimated that he was going to try a diesel-hydraulic next; I don't know what became of that.

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On 09/11/2021 at 09:33, sjp23480 said:

Just curious but during one of the links between features there was a glimpse of a B-B-B or Bo-Bo-Bo loco, in green and looking a little like the English Electric Type 3 and Type 4 designs.

 

Does anyone know what that was?

 

Thanks Steve

 

As already linked to, it's an Electrotren Renfe Class 278. The Renfe Class 277 Co-Co Electric Loco's look very similar and were built by English Electric at the Vulcan Foundry. The Class 278's were built in Spain I believe. Electrotren also do make a model of a 277, although not in stock at the moment.

 

I'm not sure how many people are aware, but Hornby do have a large Continental presence, also owning Rivarossi, Lima, Jouef and Electrotren as part of Hornby International. Electrotren focuses mostly on Spanish prototypes, Lima on Italian, Jouef on French, and Rivarossi the rest, plus the US. Whilst i've mostly only experience of their Electrotren range, the models i've come across / bought are stunning examples of modelling.

 

Back to the programme itself, i'm really enjoying it so far and not just for the model railway content. The stand design for the new Spitfire was ingenious, including the silhouette of the aircraft was an excellent idea. Whilst speaking of the latest episode, personally, I would never run my trains on the carpet (it was something drummed into me when I was very young) or hook them up to anything more than the regulated 12V DC supply(or DCC in my case), but if other people want to do that, then it's up to them. Tbh I'd rather my models survive with me into old age.

 

Next week's episode should be a good 'un, as it's featuring Everard Junction.

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1 hour ago, The Stationmaster said:

The 'Hornby Show' continues to do exactly what it says on the tin and basically it is there to entertain but with a strong element of information about the wider parts of our hobby.   

 

...   Sam's piece was different and really should have come with several very clear health warnings but within the programme it was all about adding a bit of fun and entertainment.

 

...   Maybe we should stick to watching it for what it is and not for what we think it ought to be?

 

To a certain extent, I find myself "sitting on the fence" here.

 

You've got a point about watching the series "for what it is and not for what we think it ought to be" - however, when we see stuff on there which we know to have the "potential" (sorry about the pun) to be very dangerous indeed (such as the Variac routine), I suspect that many people here would understand us finding it next to impossible to "belt" up and shut up.

 

Just for the record, I'm not accusing you of telling us to do this - far from it, in fact. However, a number of us have, at various times, been in jobs which have required constant vigilance regarding health and safety. Some of us have electrical engineering backgrounds - some have been involved in "H & S" enforcement - some work histories which include aspects of both.

 

If we see stuff that we really don't like, there were probably only ever two chances of us saying nothing - Slim and None - and Slim has just "bolted".

 

 

Of course, the series gets a number of things right - even though they might surprise some people.

 

In a previous episode, mention was made of "light bleed" on a test model of the APT - followed by ideas for how they'd be able to deal with it.

 

"Light bleed" seems to affect a number of RTR models of coaching stock and multiple units. In fact, I've sometimes considered putting together a small demo about this and other carriage lighting stuff - something which could fit into a cardboard box (which could double as part of the demo setup) - something which could easily be used as a "cameo" on a society / demo stand at an exhibition.

 

OK - it probably won't "see the light of day" - but I don't regard the underlying point as unreasonable.

 

Whilst on the subject of the APT, I don't know how many people noticed the programme narrator suggesting that colour / shade matching of paint on prototype models sometimes involves the use of a "Mk 1 eyeball". I could imagine some people thinking "yes, right". This actually struck me as credible (even if a few steps might not have been shown on the programme).

 

A few years ago, I was intrigued to notice a long, thin, box on a stand at a trade show. This box turned out to be a Farnsworth Munsell D15 colour vision test - which I was invited to try out.

 

I had no difficulty in quickly arranging all the coloured discs in the correct order - with no errors.

 

Whilst chatting with the guy manning the stand, I explained why I was so keen to do this test. I wasn't testing my own colour vision (which I already knew to be excellent). I was actually trying to see if the exhibition hall lighting affected the results of this colour vision test.

 

In case you're wondering why this company had a colour vision test on their stand, it was a reference to a line of business. They sell colour matched batches of plastics - and they employ people to do at least some of the colour matching by eye. OK - I suspect that machines are probably also used to some extent - but they certainly seem to find the "Mk 1 eyeball" rather useful in this regard.

 

Somehow, I suspect that we haven't seen the last of the Farnsworth Munsell discs - Shinobu Ishihara's colour dot patterns - or the City University's colour chameleon like rectangle patterns ... .

 

 

Huw.

 

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Regarding the programme being called Hornby: A Model World, I think we need to remember that, to the vast majority of the public outside of the hobby, model trains are Hornby. When i've had friends ask for advice about buying a train set for their kids, they're amazed when I tell them that there are a lot of other companies making model trains, other than Hornby. I guess to the wider public, Hornby is like what Hoover is for vacuum cleaners.

 

I'm just happy that we have model railway programmes on the TV. However, I just don't want people to know quite how much they are worth.... especially SWMBO :D

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3 hours ago, Geep7 said:

 Hornby is like what Hoover is for vacuum cleaners.

 

 

Not quite.

Hornby sell lots of model trains and is still a large part of the market.

Hoover is very much a generic name for a vacuum cleaner, very few these days actually being made by Hoover.

 

As in e.g. "I've just bought a Vax* hoover"

*insert brand of choice

 

Edited by melmerby
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6 hours ago, Huw Griffiths said:

Somehow, I suspect that we haven't seen the last of the Farnsworth Munsell discs - Shinobu Ishihara's colour dot patterns - or the City University's colour chameleon like rectangle patterns ... .

 

Interesting... 

 

Have you read Jasper Ffordes "Shades of Grey" (which has nothing to do with dodgy bedroom practices) ?  The plot revolves around Munsell discs and Ishihara colour dot patterns in a dystopian world.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shades_of_Grey

 

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12 minutes ago, Hroth said:

Have you read Jasper Ffordes "Shades of Grey" (which has nothing to do with dodgy bedroom practices) ?  The plot revolves around Munsell discs and Ishihara colour dot patterns in a dystopian world.

 

I'm afraid I haven't read this book - I actually hadn't heard of it.

 

The reason I mentioned this stuff is that, at one point, I considered optometry as a career - to be honest, I suspect I would probably have found it much more fulfilling than electrical engineering.

 

However, we both know how things worked out in practice.

 

 

Huw.

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1 hour ago, Huw Griffiths said:

 

I'm afraid I haven't read this book - I actually hadn't heard of it.

 

The reason I mentioned this stuff is that, at one point, I considered optometry as a career - to be honest, I suspect I would probably have found it much more fulfilling than electrical engineering.

 

However, we both know how things worked out in practice.

 

 

Huw.

 

I would heartily recommend any thing by Jasper Fforde. “Shades of Grey” is an excellent stand-alone novel (although there is due to be a sequel next year) - but I’d start with the Thursday Next series.

 

(just for context, my favourite authors are Terry Pratchett, Iain M. Banks and Jasper Fforde)

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Fifty Sheds Of Grey is probably more apt to most on here....   :prankster:

 

Look in charity shops, they probably have it for about 50p. I wouldn't pay much more. You can read it in about ten minutes.

 

A pastiche of the book, but not very rude (more Carry On style).

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fifty-Sheds-Grey-Erotica-not-too-modern/dp/0752265458

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Going OT.

I was once doing a demo of yellow stuff at a show (at around the time of the book) , when the local Mayoress was being shown round.

She seemed to take an interest in my stand of bright colours and asked about them.

I was explaining that yellow faded into many other shades, but there were only three shades of grey on the roofs though....

I think she "got it"

 

The club chairman's face was a picture........

 

 

 

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23 hours ago, Steamport Southport said:

Fifty Sheds Of Grey is probably more apt to most on here....   :prankster:

 

Look in charity shops, they probably have it for about 50p. I wouldn't pay much more. You can read it in about ten minutes.

 

A pastiche of the book, but not very rude (more Carry On style).

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fifty-Sheds-Grey-Erotica-not-too-modern/dp/0752265458

I've got 50 sheds of grey in my back bog! 

There's a great line in there... something to the effect of:

"She bent over my workbench and said "Hurt me".

So I told her she had fat ankles and made a rubbish rhubarb crumble. 

 

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23 hours ago, Steamport Southport said:

Then again I'm pretty sure that Humbrol did a Fifty Shades Of Grey style advert.

 

Might have seen it in one of the plastic kit modelling magazines rather than a railway one.

 

Here it is.

 

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Shouldn't the US ones be spelled "gray"?

The German ones are "grau", but #243, RLM 72 is just grun (green)!

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On 09/11/2021 at 06:59, ruggedpeak said:

Hopefully they have added the "don't try this at home" warning to the web version!

 

 

No, they didn't. And, quite frankly it's the sort of thing that I don't think should be shown with or without a warning. What are the chances of a teenager (or even someone slightly older) thinking "If it goes that fast at 30V, how fast will it go at 240V"?

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On 09/11/2021 at 15:49, Georgeconna said:

I would of expected given the amount of Spits they have produced over the years a Trip anywhere would not be been needed.

 

There's nothing like looking at the original though - otherwise you can fall into the trap of making a model of a model and reproducing errors.

 

Personally I think sending the staff out to view the prototype and get a feel for it is a good thing - especially if it's their first design. I often think it must be quite strange for the workers assembling locos etc in China whose chances of having seen the prototype (or anything vaguely resembling it) are pretty thin.

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On 09/11/2021 at 23:05, Huw Griffiths said:

 

 

As for GMRC, I agree that it was flawed - however, I'd still like to see it brought back when the Corona menace is finally kicked into touch. GMRC could definitely be improved - but I'd still much prefer it to some of the garbage certain TV networks seem intent on ramming down our throats.

 

 

Huw.

 

Agreed, not least because I wasn't allowed to take part in the first series (I'd already recorded something for BBC and they wouldn't let me appear in anything else until it had - belatedly - aired) despite at least two teams inviting me to take part, and wasn't chosen for series 2.

 

I get some of the thinking behind the more 'wacky' ideas on GMRC - they don't want to be turning out the same thing each week - but Series 2 pushed it a bit too far IMO.

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32 minutes ago, RJS1977 said:

 

Agreed, not least because I wasn't allowed to take part in the first series (I'd already recorded something for BBC and they wouldn't let me appear in anything else until it had - belatedly - aired) despite at least two teams inviting me to take part, and wasn't chosen for series 2.

 

I get some of the thinking behind the more 'wacky' ideas on GMRC - they don't want to be turning out the same thing each week - but Series 2 pushed it a bit too far IMO.


I’d argue that this latest program  Hornby:a model world reflects the hobby much more accurately  than GMRC did . As I’ve said I’m settling into this program and really enjoying seeing the various layouts Heaton Lodge etc . I’ve got over the initial disappointment as its really not  going to give you any insights into the really interesting decisions in Hornby ( James Mays program did this better) it’s really a PR platform for Hornby .However it is showing layouts outside Hornby and is much more typical of the hobby than Daleks, Dinosaurs and Martian Landscapes!   I know people say oh it’s telly and it needs to be entertaining to the general public but are we really saying that this hobby isn’t entertaining enough without resorting to these gimmicks? The other thing GMRC introduced was false jeopardy of doing something by a timeline . Aside from making a layout for an exhibition surely one of the major points of our hobby is the relaxation aspect . Hours can go past and it’s enjoyable , this was completely missing from GMRC . Overall I’d say this program is much more representative of the hobby as a whole . I hope people are enjoying it . 

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