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The Chaldrons, By Accurascale


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2 minutes ago, Islesy said:

 

C44647D6-3D22-4B73-9FD4-4D1411B2BE2D.jpeg

 

Crickey!  that's what I thought was a "cow" on the Stella wagons.  So what was a cow I hear you ask? or probably not. It was attached to the rear wagon coupling and it's low end dragged along the ground. It prevented the wagons running "amane"  (away) on inclines when the rope or a coupling failed.

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Completely irrelevant to the models themselves but why is everyone on the video in the Accurascale blog pronouncing chaldron with a ch, as in church? According to the Chilton Ironworks book, and to various internet sources, the word is a derivation, or older spelling, of cauldron, so who has added this ch in speech? Surely it ought to be pronounced with a silent h, as in Christmas? That's how I've always said it.

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Well Dave, I guess it depends on local dialects and pronounciations. Considering that Paul J at Beamish is a local, and that it’s a North-Eastern term, I’ll settle on his way of pronouncing it. To me, a Cauldron is a big pot, but then again, I’m from the sticky out bit of North Hertfordshire that’s neither Anglia, the Home Counties or the Midlands.

I really won’t be judging anyone for how they pronounce the word…

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17 minutes ago, Ruston said:

That's how I've always said it.

 

Aye but who taught yer?

 

In Co. Durham it the pronunciation depended on which town or village you came from and in some instances which part of the town or village you lived in. As I travelled around different collieries you soon learned that the same words could have different pronunciation and quite often a totally different meaning.

Taking things to a regional level take the word "bait" in Co. Durham coalfield and "snap" in Yorkshire.

Edited by Porcy Mane
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7 minutes ago, Islesy said:

Well Dave, I guess it depends on local dialects and pronounciations. Considering that Paul J at Beamish is a local,

I know Paul and he's from that famous Durham village of Manchester. :lol:

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3 minutes ago, McC said:

One assumes it’s from the Middle French chauderon and this pronounced with a soft ch 

 

True, there is a great deal of Middle French spoken in Northumberland - must be the Percy influence. But chauderon is from the same root as cauldron.

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1 minute ago, Compound2632 said:

must be the Percy influence.

 

Thanks.

 

Regardless of pronunciation I'm sure they'll fly of the shelves like hot cakes.

 

We'll soon have the Dubliners all driving about in Chimeras (or Bentleys).

 

I mean you don't even need track to run them on, as this pic of a rake of chummins* show.

*Pitmatic for empty rail wagon or tub.

 

ChauldronsHomeFarm.jpg.192ffc796af705a1b5312361afc1223c.jpg

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12 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

 

True, there is a great deal of Middle French spoken in Northumberland - must be the Percy influence. 

My dear old Uncle Joe was a Percy from Northumberland (but from one of the impecunious branches of the family), 

He worked on the construction of Motorways driving a grader and was fluent in Anglo-Saxon.

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5 hours ago, Porcy Mane said:

 

And variations were built in Australia  (Newcastle).

 

6 hours ago, Mark Saunders said:

They made it to France and Chile!

 

...maybe the second run will include French, Chilean and Aussie liveries!

 

I know people have ideas about what Accurascale's next announcement should be, and which colliery company's dumb-buffered loco they will choose.  Personally I'd like to see something more like this, though I don't think it would achieve  the runaway sales I expect the chauldrons to produce   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:National_Railway_Museum_York_Oct_2013_281.jpg

 

But I think they will pull another rabbit out of the hat and surprise us with something altogether more radical - such as erratically wavy NCB track that needs an uneven baseboard !

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"a common outline, for the transportation of coal, brick, timber, stone and ‘muck’ across the North East of England."

 

I think I can model most of those loads ... muck in 00... not sure if Im up for that.

 

incredible idea Accurascale... hope you sell cauldrons of em .

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, ChicagoNick said:

"a common outline, for the transportation of coal, brick, timber, stone and ‘muck’ across the North East of England."

 

I think I can model most of those loads ... muck in 00... not sure if Im up for that.

 

incredible idea Accurascale... hope you sell cauldrons of em .

 

 

 

 

In colliery usage, 'muck' meant spoil; anything that had to be shifted to get at the desired commodity, rather than what we tend to associate with the word today.

 

However, that's not to say the railway companies didn't move that around..... 

 

John

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29 minutes ago, Wickham Green too said:

Apologies .... I did check the website before putting foot in mouth !

 

No need to apologise, as you said they're not currently on the website. We are working on them at the moment and should have prices and availability on them in the coming weeks.

 

Cheers!

 

Fran 

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15 hours ago, Islesy said:

Dave @Rustonasked about the magnetic couplings and, as is often the way, the first prototypes weren’t quite ready when the EPs shipped. @Accurascale Franhas added the pictures we received from the factory and there’s not much else I can really explain without having them to hand to demonstrate! In a nutshell, there’s a length of fine length chain attached to each coupling pin, and at the head is a housing containing a (very) small magnet. Of course, this works with the wagons, but how then to attach to a locomotive, or additional item of rolling stock? Well, each pack will come with at least two NEM fit magnetic couplings, something akin to the attached picture.

C44647D6-3D22-4B73-9FD4-4D1411B2BE2D.jpeg


These couplings with nems either side would be a very nice lazy way for a lot of different freight wagons.

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15 hours ago, Ruston said:

I know Paul and he's from that famous Durham village of Manchester. :lol:

From Manchester ?

wouldnt that pronunciation be Chuldrun then ?

:D
 

Round the corner from me was the worlds first “railway”.., The Surrey Iron Railway and they used a form Chaldron in Coulsdon..

Edited by adb968008
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