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Continous run N scale layout


dave ottney

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OK, I'm going back to my model RR'ing roots and am tinkering with N scale after 35 yrs (this is a diversion from my 1:20 scale modeling). I'm interested in primarily running passenger trains with very little switching, Right now I'm picking up current Amtrak stock but I have a line on a collection of Graham Farish passenger equipment. Most of the GF stuff are models of British passenger trains from the 1960's though there is one train with a Flying Scotsman in the lead , two with class 47's and one with a DMU(?) in the lead.

There's the equipment background.

 

I've been looking at the continous circuit (roundy rounds as you guys put it) here and have been kind of amazed at the widths of the layouts. There's one that is 10'x3' with tons of track and another that is 8'x'2' again with a lot of track. At 3' wide the largest practical curve is about 16" and at 2' wide its 11", yet looking at these plans they have multiple mainlines thus bringing the inner curves progressively down. I like the idea of at least 2 mainlines, it looks like the mainline running near to me and the some of the lines I just road on in Europe,

 

Question 1- What is the limit here for curves keeping in mind that passenger trains are going to run?

I know my Kato P42 Genesis can make it around a 9-10" curve (I have an old loop I tested it on when I got it yesterday) but it looks pretty goofy.

 

Question 2- What are the practical operating limits on the Graham Farish stuff I've listed?

 

Thanks for any advice offered,

Dave

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Graham Farish stuff all does 9 inch curves.. Some of the newest steam locomotives are much happier on 10.5 or require 12" curves to fit optional accessories like the accurate front wheels and some steps (otherwise the front truck fouls the accessories on sharp curves).

 

Visually and for close coupling 9 inch is best avoided, 12 inch is great if you have the room and looks far better.

 

For a double track mainline remember we drive on the left ...

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From a purely visual point of view. go for the largest curve that you can on scenic areas. Where the curve is hidden I would try to aim for a 12 inch minimum. Whilst the locos and stock that you have will travel round tighter curves, putting in larger ones future proofs the layout against purchases not yet made.

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Thanks guys. I'm just amazed that even some of the larger stuff can negotiate such tight curves as exhibited on some of the plans and actual layouts. 12" sounds like a good minimum. When I did HO modeling I had minimum 24" into sidings and 30" on the mainline so I'm going to see if I can grab as much real estate as possible in N.

Ah yes Etched, left hand running. I believe there's some of that here in the States too.

Dave

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