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Bath Queen Square


queensquare
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2 minutes ago, Re6/6 said:

Glorious here too, though not a flake to be seen. A bit different to just down the road mind you!

Too blooming cold to work in the shed.

Ah ! The benefits of being "Beside the seaside, beside the sea"  :dirol_mini:

G

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We are surrounded by sea and connected to the UK by just one road, we had snow yesterday that caused some problems. Ours has gone but snow can still be seen on the hills around Dorchester.

It's lovely here today but freezing cold!

I was going to come and say hello last week at Southampton but you seemed very busy every time I passed, maybe next time.

Martyn

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6 hours ago, mullie said:

We are surrounded by sea and connected to the UK by just one road, we had snow yesterday that caused some problems. Ours has gone but snow can still be seen on the hills around Dorchester.

It's lovely here today but freezing cold!

I was going to come and say hello last week at Southampton but you seemed very busy every time I passed, maybe next time.

Martyn

for one awful moment I thought you lived in Sheppey  :jester:  (no offence intended or meant)

 

Nick

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These are the sort of scenes I want to be able to recreate, all very much in my broadly 1920s time period. The 0-6-0 and 2-4-0 were common, everyday locos at Bath, the Spinner would have been a much more occasional visitor and regarded as a good cop by the local spotters. The local passenger headcode suggests its on a filling in turn with a local from Bristol (that's the duty my part built Spinner will have), but why it needs quite so much coal is anybody's guess - it won't be making a trip south over the Mendips!

 

IMG_0928.JPG.32d29587e9d1a355e180f494354402ea.JPG

 

img083.jpg.aee1c04627d2d288cf569e6277d06f1d.jpg

 

Spinner_at_Bath_004.jpg.3d3b58f02ac53f0e01b9301c5c9d9ffd.jpg

 

Jerry

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While Tim's suggestion is doubtless very appropriate to a 2FS model, I suspect that the coal visible in Jerry's photo of the real thing isn't in the tender but behind it. (I have to admit to having been caught the same way a few times in the past myself.)

 

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1 hour ago, bécasse said:

While Tim's suggestion is doubtless very appropriate to a 2FS model, I suspect that the coal visible in Jerry's photo of the real thing isn't in the tender but behind it. (I have to admit to having been caught the same way a few times in the past myself.)

 

 

Well you've been caught out again because the coal is definitely in the tender, the way it's stacked around the tank vent is clearly visible. I've seen plenty of coal stacks from the early 1920s, very common due to the fear of strikes and coal shortages, and it's never stacked in a heap like that.

In addition there's  a row of huts behind the tender so unless it's piled up on the roof......

 

Jerry

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3 hours ago, queensquare said:

 

Well you've been caught out again because the coal is definitely in the tender, the way it's stacked around the tank vent is clearly visible. I've seen plenty of coal stacks from the early 1920s, very common due to the fear of strikes and coal shortages, and it's never stacked in a heap like that.

In addition there's  a row of huts behind the tender so unless it's piled up on the roof......

 

Jerry

Sorry, Jerry, we are obviously talking about two different heaps of coal, one in the tender which I accept is a bit high (waiting for the fireman to break some of the larger lumps up perhaps) but not excessive and one behind which is quite a remarkable stack - and doubtless there in anticipation of some sort of supply problem, the 1911 strike perhaps?

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No David, that coal is all in the tender.  It is wrapping around the front tool box and has had some removed from the nearside front corner.  It’s so Jerry can justify using a Peco Jubilee mechanism.

 

tim

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3 hours ago, bécasse said:

Sorry, Jerry, we are obviously talking about two different heaps of coal, one in the tender which I accept is a bit high (waiting for the fireman to break some of the larger lumps up perhaps) but not excessive and one behind which is quite a remarkable stack - and doubtless there in anticipation of some sort of supply problem, the 1911 strike perhaps?

 

Nope, youv'e lost me on the two different heaps of coal.

 

The date is the early 1920s 

 

Jerry

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2 minutes ago, CF MRC said:

No David, that coal is all in the tender.  It is wrapping around the front tool box and has had some removed from the nearside front corner.  It’s so Jerry can justify using a Peco Jubilee mechanism.

 

tim

 

Oddly enough I was writing about Jubilee tender mechanisms today and how in the 70s and 80s almost everything was powered by them. My Spinner will have a finescaled Dapol Terrier chassis in the tender, both the wheels and wheelbase are perfect- and it will only require a very modest heap of coal:rolleyes:

 

Jerry

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19 hours ago, bécasse said:

While Tim's suggestion is doubtless very appropriate to a 2FS model, I suspect that the coal visible in Jerry's photo of the real thing isn't in the tender but behind it. (I have to admit to having been caught the same way a few times in the past myself.)

 

 

I think we've all suffered from a tender behind at one time or another.

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58 minutes ago, Miss Prism said:

 

 

58 minutes ago, Miss Prism said:

I'm surprised you do not need a longitudinal purlin over that length:

 

jerry-big-purlin.gif.eb929591f678bab396de32f1389163b0.gif

 

The clue is in the post, it's greatly simplified, my roof is plasticard not timber :-)

The timber you have highlighted is the ridge board, its not a purlin. On a roof this size there would probably be a couple of purlins each side to support the span of the rafters between the wall plate and the ridge. I've not seen the need to represent any of them on the model - they can't be seen. 

 

Jerry

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Inspirational stuff, Jerry.

Those shots of the interior through the shed doors are already really atmospheric.

 

8 hours ago, queensquare said:

I've not seen the need to represent any of them on the model - they can't be seen. 

So that's why it takes me so long to build anything! :tease:

(He says, whilst at the same time trying to understand properly the pipe runs under the cab of a 9F... especially the tricky ones to the exhaust steam injector which is completely hidden away behind the live steam injector and it's own spaghetti...)

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39 minutes ago, Miss Prism said:

Sorry about the misuse of 'purlin', Jerry. I meant a thing or things running longitudinally along some part(s) of the underside of the roof.
 

 

There would have been but as you can see in the prototype picture everything above the roof lights is in murk and darkness so can be safely ignored on the model as they will be invisible from all available viewing angles. There should be a whole forest of timbers and stays in addition to the ones I've included but Im happy that the ones I've included give the right impression and, importantly, will throw convincing shadows when peering into the shed.

 

001.jpg.5438b65fca3d50c24e6566fa3617cca0.jpg

Jerry

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4 minutes ago, Nick Mitchell said:

Inspirational stuff, Jerry.

Those shots of the interior through the shed doors are already really atmospheric.

 

So that's why it takes me so long to build anything! :tease:

(He says, whilst at the same time trying to understand properly the pipe runs under the cab of a 9F... especially the tricky ones to the exhaust steam injector which is completely hidden away behind the live steam injector and it's own spaghetti...)

 

Many thanks Nick. I do tend to take a broad, brush approach, particularly with scenic items - it is 2mm after all!

 

Your antics with working motion and such like on 2mm locos are inspirational - your recent series on building the Jubilee chassis is brilliant and, in my view RMWeb at its absolute best. Its completely barking mad of course but no more so than attempting a large, prototype station in 2FS in the 1920s pretty much single handed!! We really should get out more:crazy_mini:

 

Jerry

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Apropos of nothing current, I have just come across several pages of photos of the building of Tucking Mill Viaduct, in 'Somerset & Avon Railways in Old Photographs collected by Kevin Robertson' (Alan Sutton Publishing) I expect they have come to your notice - but just in case...........

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