Jump to content

Weathering Locos and Wagons


Recommended Posts

I have decided to start a blog on my attempts at weathering Steam and Diesel locos and wagons. I use many different products for weathering. Paints start with Humbrol enamels, Railmatch Acrylics, Carrs Powders, Talcom powder, and some water colour pencils and chalks.

I will start with a coup[le of pics of some Bullied Pacifics 34043 Combe Martin and 34007 Wadebridge both were re named and numbered from the original Wilton, done about 10 years ago just with the Carrs Powders

post-9335-0-65507600-1335556527_thumb.jpg

post-9335-0-67617700-1335556639_thumb.jpg

Edited by Andrew P
  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ahh kingsmill. One of the layouts that got me back into model railways. Infact it might of been you that gave me the idea of cutting out all the layouts from magazines that caught my eye for a layout file?

 

Guy

Thanks Guy, yes that is what I do, infact you have just reminded me that I have almost 2 years of R.M, MR and Hornby, so a lot to do, but well worth the effort as I have loads of info on weathering from other people, signaling and loco upgrades etc plus loads of cracking layouts..
Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice. Can you detail what products you have in the first of that series of pics? I.E. product/manufacturer/colour/number.

Much appreciated

Guy

Hello Guy, here is a breakdown as best I can of the products I use, I am not saying they are the best as I have not tried some other manufactures so I can not compare.

 

Lets start withe Enamel's they are from Humbrol and I use

Matt Black = 33, for general dirtying down of locos to give an oily sooty tone for roofs and sides and a s a base cote over the bogies to take away the shiny plastic look.

Glos Black = 21, this is for wet oily runs and for coil springs on loco bogies ect, use very spareingly as otherwise it looks wrong!

Metalcote = 27004, when dry this will burnish into a metalic shine and is great for steps on locos and things like that, this is sometimes used in conjunction with Matt Black for Diesel Roofs around the exhaust ports.

Matt Brown = 113, this is the darker of the two browns and I use this as a base for rust along with,

Matt Brown = 63, this is a lighter almost tan colour, again like all Enamel's all are best used with the Dry Brush technique.

 

Actylic's are from the Railmatch Range and are,

Weathered Black = 2412, BE CAREFULL AND SHAKE OR STIR WELL! this tends to come out as a blueish colour if you dont, I use this on some wagon underframes but again dry brushed on and ALWAYS used in conjunction with any of the following, BUT DO NOT MIX ON THE PALLETT, blend on the subject,

Frame Dirt = 2402, as above really.

Sleeper Grime = 2406, as above again,

Humbrol White = 22, used for Lime stains and blending

All the acrylics are used for track colour as well as loco and wagon underframes, and as I only build small layouts (Glen Roy, Kingsmill, Deesdale Road, St Budoc, LochLeven and Trebudoc) its not to big a job. I dip the tip of my brush from one jar to another so as not to give an even rail or sleeper colour, the secret here is again to blend on the rail BUT NOT ALWAYS, as sometimes a deffinate colour change can look good and focus the eye into the different colours used. Remember Darker where locos or coal wagons stand.

 

Weathering powders are from the Carrs Range and I have had them for so many years that I do not know the correct names or numbers but let me try to describe them,

Matt Black, dose what it says, and is great on steam locos and also undreframes.

Sooty Black, this seems to have some brown in with it and is great for older steam locos to get that sooty/ rusty look to boilers etc.

Reddish Brown, I use this as part of my rusting process and dab into wet acrylic or enamel,

Orange, I use this again as above and combined with the Reddish Brown for dusting over Steam loco underframes.

And finnaly household Talcom Powder for lightening up the dark tones.

Dont be afraid to moisten a brush for some parts BUT always keep the main brush dry.

 

I hope this is a help to anyone not only not owning an Air Brush but also to demonstrate that even an Air Brush user can use other tecniques to add veriety to their models.

 

Below are some photos of a Hornby Railroad 9f done entirely with the powders apart from the white lime staine that was done with the white acrylic, I also added Front Steam Pipes, Real Coal, Crew, Lamps, and I also cut off the front steps and mounted them under the front chassis.

post-9335-0-55555300-1335862537_thumb.jpg

post-9335-0-94160800-1335862589_thumb.jpg

post-9335-0-52072800-1335862634_thumb.jpg

Edited by Andrew P
  • Like 16
Link to post
Share on other sites

That has to be some of the best weathering I've ever seen; I had to look twice at some of the photos to be sure they were models, and not the real thing. The ballast hoppers were particularly well done, I thought.

Thank you Brian, Nice of you to say such kind things about my efforts, I will post new pics every couple of days ranging from Steam to modern image.
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice weathering, l like the in depth instruction's as well, maybe we all can try a little weathering, following your lead, well done, keep posting the picture's please.............

Link to post
Share on other sites

Guest Max Stafford

Nice work Andrew. It's a good demonstration of what can be achieved even if your budget doesn't stretch to an airbrush. I particularly like the subtle textures on the Limpet.

 

Dave.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice work Andrew. It's a good demonstration of what can be achieved even if your budget doesn't stretch to an airbrush. I particularly like the subtle textures on the Limpet.

 

Dave.

Thanks Dave, Yes the cost of a half decent Air Brush is certainly a deciding factor in my case, but, also my Den only has a small extractor fan for ventilation and the fumes and spray dust would circulate around the House as it is part of the original garage with the main door sealed up.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Super weathering, Andy. The fuel tanker and mineral wagons that you recently did for me are excellent.

 

Binny

Thanks Binny, I must get some photos of them for this site.
Link to post
Share on other sites

That has to be some of the best weathering I've ever seen; I had to look twice at some of the photos to be sure they were models, and not the real thing. The ballast hoppers were particularly well done, I thought.

 

I will second that. Marvellous photos. Thanks very much for giving me some inspiration.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...