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40 minutes ago, Dunsignalling said:

I'm also a track rubber user, the sort I use comes from Squires Tools, known as a Polifix Block. I think this is possibly the same as or very similar to the DOGA item. The Peco ones are cheaper but leave too much residue for my liking.

 

I used to use cellulose thinners too, but apparently contact with it should be avoided as its been rule carcinogenic. I now use lighter fuel (petrol type) from Poundland on a damp pad to wipe off any "leftovers" from the cleaning block remaining on the rail head. Finish off with a light hoovering.

 

John

John

 

Sorry to tell you, but petrol is also carcinogenic. I remember visiting a (or rather the) petrol station on the island of Rousay (off the Orkneys) to do a health and safety audit. He got his petrol off the ferry in 205 litre drums. When I asked him how he transferred that to his underground tank, he said that he siphoned it. So I asked him how he stared the siphon - by sucking! What do you put for that for Health and Safety? Though I suppose he will live to a hundred despite that.

 

Lloyd

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17 minutes ago, FarrMan said:

John

 

Sorry to tell you, but petrol is also carcinogenic. I remember visiting a (or rather the) petrol station on the island of Rousay (off the Orkneys) to do a health and safety audit. He got his petrol off the ferry in 205 litre drums. When I asked him how he transferred that to his underground tank, he said that he siphoned it. So I asked him how he stared the siphon - by sucking! What do you put for that for Health and Safety? Though I suppose he will live to a hundred despite that.

 

Lloyd

Thanks, I had a feeling it might be but as sales don't appear to have been restricted as severely as thinners, I'm hoping it's less so!

 

I remember reading once that pretty much everything is carcinogenic if one is exposed to enough of it.....

 

John

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I've used

1. Peco track cleaning rubber, then

2. Methylated spirits on a soft cloth.

 

That's worked very well in getting that black gungy deposit off rails that gradually builds up.  Trains run very reliably for hours after a cleaning session (layout's in the loft). 

 

I have tried Woodland Scenics "clean track solution" TT4554, on Gaugemaster track cleaning pads, the type that clip under a wagon axle with a pad that runs over the  rails. (Believe they're made by Noch).  Anyone else use these?   Just to keep track clean after cleaning session. 

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On 14/11/2021 at 04:22, Jesse Sim said:

I didn’t have doubt when I went into wagon building. After the first two or three they went together quite easily. I’ve build four coaches and a number of NPC’s….

I was teasing. It was the bit about building them with your eyes shut…my apologies.

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57 minutes ago, Dunsignalling said:

Thanks, I had a feeling it might be but as sales don't appear to have been restricted as severely as thinners, I'm hoping it's less so!

 

I remember reading once that pretty much everything is carcinogenic if one is exposed to enough of it.....

 

John

The one thing ‘elf and safety haven’t yet worked out is how to prevent widespread fatalities as a result of being present at one’s own birth…

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Track cleaning, I use a combination of Peco track rubbers, 2400 grit/emery paper and IPA or MEK applied with Tamiya Cotton swabs. No detriment on Nickel Silver/PB/steel track in my experience.

 

Always enjoy at a show when I get told by an 'expert' not to do any/all of the above....

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I decided not to mention fine abrasive paper for the really stubborn bits when I posted my first somewhat evasive reply, as I could imagine the numbers queueing up to tell me that you mustn't ever, ever, ever do that, notwithstanding the fact that it works. In fact, I once found that fine abrasive used across, rather than along the heads of the rails worked wonders after repeated use of a track rubber along the rail heads seemed to have polished the rails so well that lighter locos were becoming susceptible to wheel slip where it never used to be a problem.

 

Removal of the loosened debris after cleaning is, as stated by others above, a good idea. If nothing else, it plays havoc with electrical blade-contact if you have any points that rely on that. You may need to physically wipe the grot out of the gaps by pulling a piece of card through, as the blade is pushed gently towards the stock rail. Failing this, a fan of storage sidings with all of the trains trying to move at once is always amusing to see...

Edited by gr.king
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6 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Are cats naturally model railway enthusiasts?

 

It's simply that the cat will place itself wherever your attention is focused, because your attention should be focused on it. It's an "If the mountain won't come to Mohammed..." thing.

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There was one particular Rmwebber who wouldn't let anyone so much as mention track rubbers without chiming in loudly to say it would result in their rails wearing away almost

instantly. It was as if someone had said "I'm thinking of cleaning my track by dousing my entire layout in kerosene and then setting fire to it."

 

Like others I have been using track rubbers, abrasive paper etc on track without any detrimental consequences for at least as long as the typical life of a layout.

 

 

I do use use cleaning pads on several vehicles (in both N and 00) but by far the best way to keep track clean is simply to run trains often.

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Track cleaning = I just run longish trains (with metal wheels where possible) on all running lines at least weekly. Works for me in both OO & O scales. Very occasionally I use a very fine emery sponge block on some areas as needed. 

 

The round the garden G gauge (with Peco track) gets a two or three times a year rub with an emery sponge block on the end of a broom handle, spray a bit of WD40 on the point blades & mechanism. A touch of switch cleaner spray on loco wheels / slider pick ups helps also. The garden loop will overwinter now. Track is about 20 years old & after such a clean everything runs well.

 

Little tip - on my OO layout one six foot long steepish grade on the high level goods lines occasionally gets a rub crossways with a rough grade emery block. The cross scratching really does help adhesion, especially some Bachmann steam locos. I do this when slip becomes evident, every 4 months or so. No problems with either locos or track (Peco N/S).

 

Brit15

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7 hours ago, FarrMan said:

If I am allowed to pick the assembled brains here again, what advice would you give for cleaning old nickel silver track. It has not been touched for 25 years! I have come across suggestions for alcohol (on the track, not in me!), acetone, a cleaning pad and CRC 2-26. All appear to have advantages and disadvantages, and any advice will be much appreciated.

 

Lloyd

Good afternoon Lloyd,

 

I wonder how many self-appointed experts exist on this thread? Thankfully, not many!

 

Track cleaning or, perhaps more-important, track-keeping-clean...........

 

Because, as mentioned, Little Bytham exists in a largely dust-free atmosphere (as opposed to one full of soft furnishings/carpets/fabrics, etc.,) then track getting really dirty isn't a problem - dirty track means arcing, which means more dirt, more arcing, more dirt......................... And so on. 

 

I find the simplest way of keeping track clean is to run the layout. And, this means running locos with more-than-adequate pick-ups and all stock equipped with metal wheels (plastic wheels are anathema to clean track). While running the layout prevents most dirt build-up, I also employ two further methods for 'keeping-the-track-clean'. 

 

These have been shown before but not everyone has read through near-2,500 pages! 

 

1488585315_Nochaxlepad.jpg.ff096242ea25e9a97507409f0900512c.jpg

 

This is a most-useful device, made by Noch and sold through Gaugemaster. It's a simple felt pad which just clips to an axle and rubs along the tops of the rails when its vehicle is in motion. No fluid is put on it. It was recommended to me by a good friend.

 

I've got at least one goods train equipped with these on all four main circuits.

 

A very effective method of keeping track clean is this...............

 

1139021050_trackcleaningwagon01.jpg.73efef3801ca74147554b3b05afd0f2a.jpg

 

284927373_trackcleaningwagon02.jpg.a972b5b95a97e0fe90278b587e722ab9.jpg

 

1894199820_trackcleaningwagon03.jpg.5b6dbc600dd5368e4a73c8a543dadb59.jpg

 

Made by another dear friend of mine, it consists of no more than an old bogie wagon to which is added lead. Further lead presses down on to a pad of hardboard (rough-side-down). The wagon is then either pushed or towed several times around each main circuit before a running session. It won't clean dirty track (though there's plenty of muck on the pad, which is scraped off regularly), but it keeps the trackwork clean. 

 

Occasionally, there'll be a stubborn bit of dirt. I remove this with my DOGA track rubber (seen in the last image). This is far superior to the Peco equivalent (which crumbles in my experience and can leave a gritty residue). 

 

I've never tried fluid track cleaners, so cannot comment first-hand. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

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Thanks again for all the advice. Any suggestions as to where to obtain DOGA track rubbers? All I seem to get when looking it up on Google, is references to yoga for dogs. I haven't got a dog, and cannot see how that would clean the track anyway.

 

Lloyd

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1 minute ago, FarrMan said:

Thanks again for all the advice. Any suggestions as to where to obtain DOGA track rubbers? All I seem to get when looking it up on Google, is references to yoga for dogs. I haven't got a dog, and cannot see how that would clean the track anyway.

 

Lloyd

It's the Double O Gauge Association, if that helps. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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1 hour ago, 30368 said:

Afternoon Tony,

 

I wanted to thank you for the advice and help regarding the Pro-scale V2 kit that I have spent about 3 months building, at times it seemed a lot longer...

The etches supplied to convert the tender to the high front type fitted to most V2 tenders fitted perfectly, thanks again for them. I am fairly happy with the results and with the HL coreless motor and HL gearbox the loco pulls well. The total cost came to about £130 with the various additions, the kit cost me £50.

My pictures are a bit rubbish and that is not all down to the dust etc....

 

2080255159_IMG_6878(2).JPG.50e036e1bc656374a813b2e3a44a3ba5.JPG

Some rectification required to tender lining this side.

1992252562_IMG_6876(2).JPG.46c91fc416041f32d20fb309c251ced6.JPG

1359199757_IMG_6874(2).JPG.58f461f197f9779e82e88da73a3bb128.JPG

 

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

Thanks for showing us your V2 Richard,

 

A very fine job, too.

 

I'm delighted those bits I sent you for the tender worked. I believe they came off a DMR fret, where both options were available. I made a GS tender with the low frontplate and symmetrical cut-outs at the top.

 

Keep up the good work.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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