Jump to content

Dave F's photos - ongoing - more added each day


Recommended Posts

That's very thin looking route indicator on that colourlight! Super moment in time photo with both old and new signals standing together.

Not a route indicator I don't think. There's no junction between Bingham and Aslockton that I can think of. I wonder if it's an oversize metal cross fitted to the colour light head rather than the bags we get nowadays?

 

Edit beaten to it!

Edited by great central
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold

Hi, Dave. I like the photos of Swayfield. They are most evocative, and I'm full of nostalgia on seeing them. It appears that the express trains in between the Deltic hauled services were mostly worked by 47's, which is what I remember well.

The HST in the last photo makes a fine sight in the livery which was designed for it.

 

With warmest regards,

 

Rob.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Swayfield was a super spot - you could see down trains heading up to Stoke for miles.

 

I remember taking pictures here when they were rebuilding the bridge for electrification. The contractors asked where I was from and when I said "Derby" (where I then lived), they thought I was an official BR photographer.

 

I didn't disillusion them..........

Edited by Peter Kazmierczak
  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

Back to the Tilbury line today, with a couple of ships just for a change.

 

 

 

attachicon.gifLeigh on Sea Class 302 Sept 74 C1783.jpg

Leigh on Sea Class 302 Sept 74 C1783  Not one of my better photos.

 

 

 

 

David

Hi David

 

Today I purchased some second hand Mk1 suburbans with the aim of making them into a class 302, so a photo of the MBS is worth a lot to me. Thank you.

 

Note the green ladies only sticker in the compartment next to the guard.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I can remember trips to Rothesay on PS Waverley from Glasgow Broomielaw back in the 60's I was always fascinated watching the paddles operate through the vision panels and yes the water level looked a little worrying even to a wee boy! The crew usually had a couple of musicians who performed impromptu sessions on most of the Clyde steamer trips, happy days thanks for the memories Dave.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold

Hi, Dave. I like the L.T.& S.R. photos. I think the sun was at a low angle in the first photo, so, taking into account the time of year, the train must have been an early morning service.

It's good to see PS Waverley. She makes a fine sight in your photo of her.

 

With warmest regards,

 

Rob.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice to see the Peckett "Triassic", C 2366, there are two others preserved, Liassic on a private railway, and Jurassic, currently well on with being restored at the Lincolnshire Coast Light Railway, Ingoldmells, nr Skegness.

 

I worked with Jurassic as a sixteen year old when the railway was at Humberston, nr Cleethorpes.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I can remember trips to Rothesay on PS Waverley from Glasgow Broomielaw back in the 60's I was always fascinated watching the paddles operate through the vision panels and yes the water level looked a little worrying even to a wee boy! The crew usually had a couple of musicians who performed impromptu sessions on most of the Clyde steamer trips, happy days thanks for the memories Dave.

 

Mike,

Hope they weren't playing "Nearer, my God, to thee" on the boat.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mike,

Hope they weren't playing "Nearer, my God, to thee" on the boat.

No Peter it was much more lively 'thank God' usually Scottish ditties like "Donald where's ma'troosers" "Bonnie bonnie lassie" (not the dog!) "Speed bonnie boat" ........I could go on but know where to stop hahaha :angel:

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting design of concrete sleeper on those photos of Kineton; a WD special? One of my drivers (long retired) did his National Service at Kineton. The tracks are laid out as a set of loops, with points giving access to each of those large bunkers visible in the distance. Locos would pick up groups of wagons at the main yard, then run around the site, and drop the cuts off at their destination; the object, on the morning run, was to try and do this as quickly as possible, so you got first dibs in the canteen. Inevitably, this involved lots of (officially forbidden) fly shunting, a risky activity, given the quantity of explosives on site.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Preferably "Sheep may safely graze" (J2617)

Jonathan

One of the most beautiful pieces of music ever written Jonathan. Very appropriate for the image in J2617 and strangely calming on a day like today when I can look at Dave's wonderfully evocative images, in an almost summery garden, with a beer - in quiet contemplation and nostalgia.

 

Best regards

 

MattWood

Link to post
Share on other sites

The East Coast Main Line today at Swayfield, between Peterborough and Stoke Summit.  The photos are spread over ten years.

 

 

attachicon.gif Swayfield Class 47 Newcastle to Kings X Aug 71 C684.jpg

Swayfield Class 47 Newcastle to Kings X Aug 71 C684

 

 

attachicon.gif Swayfield Class 47 down ex pass July 72 C0996.jpg

Swayfield Class 47 down ex pass July 72 C0996

 

 

attachicon.gif Swayfield Class 47 up empty cement May 74 C1614.jpg

Swayfield Class 47 up empty cement May 74 C1614

 

 

attachicon.gif Swayfield Class 37 up empty Cartics May 74 C1619.jpg

Swayfield Class 37 up empty Cartics May 74 C1619

 

 

attachicon.gifSwayfield Class 43 up ex pass 28th July 81 C5447.jpg

Swayfield Class 43 up ex pass 28th July 81 C5447

 

 

David

 

C5447 shows a 9 car HST rake, surely very rare at this time?

 

ROB

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold

Hi, Dave. I like the photos of Shildon. Especially Timothy Hackworth's house. The second set of photo's are quite remarkable. They show, in Kineton Depot particularly, a railway line which I am not familiar with, but I feel I know something about it now. And those concrete sleepers are interesting. I wonder why they were designed like that?

 

With warmest regards,

 

Rob.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Of the sleepers remaining in those places at Kineton, many are still of that design. The layout of the depot has changed completely sine 71. The whole depot was rebuilt to a new design where fork lifts and road traffic is the tran sport method of choice with 5 road rail transfer platforms. Much of the old layout can still be seen on Google Earth or similar.

 

Kineton was built first in the 1930s, extended in the war and the 50s, rebuilt in the 50s then completely changed in the late 80s. The sleepers may have been a design to reduce concrete usage or to set more quickly... I can confirm they are still extremely heavy!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Of the sleepers remaining in those places at Kineton, many are still of that design. The layout of the depot has changed completely sine 71. The whole depot was rebuilt to a new design where fork lifts and road traffic is the tran sport method of choice with 5 road rail transfer platforms. Much of the old layout can still be seen on Google Earth or similar.

 

Kineton was built first in the 1930s, extended in the war and the 50s, rebuilt in the 50s then completely changed in the late 80s. The sleepers may have been a design to reduce concrete usage or to set more quickly... I can confirm they are still extremely heavy!

 

Fascinating place. I did some courses there in the late 90's and got to travel around a lot of the system.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...