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GWR Buffalo (1076 class) in 2FS

Posted by Ian Smith , in Rolling Stock - Locomotives 03 August 2015 · 998 views

2FS GWR Bufallo
GWR Buffalo (1076 class) in 2FS For my next 2mm scale engine I had been considering an Armstrong Goods 0-6-0 tender engine (which I will also build) but in the end I've decided to begin work on a GWR "Buffalo" 1076 class. This engine is effectively a tank engine version of the Armstrong Goods, having the same wheelbase but slightly smaller wheels (and obviously no tender), and also has outside frames. For my chosen period (c.1906) nearly all of this class still had their saddle tanks (they were later rebuilt with pannier tanks).

Drawing on the experience of my first 2mm scale engine (my 1854 class saddle tank), I decided that this one will be fully scratch built (the predecessor being a "conversion" from a Farish 57xx - I say "conversion" because in reality there isn't a huge amount left of the Farish model!). One of the main things that bothers me about the previous model is that there is no rivet detail on the saddle tank where the plates of steel were joined together. It looks OK from normal viewing distances, but I know it's missing - I could add some using Archer's rivet transfers I suppose, but as I said in my blog when I was building the model there are other compromises so eventually I will probably give it a complete new body. That said, it did what I hoped it would do - to allow me to prove to myself that I could model in 2mm Finescale, and more importantly get a locomotive to work in the scale.

However, I've digressed. So on to the "Buffalo"...

As mentioned above, for this model I intend to put a representation of the rivets on both the saddle and the outside frames. To this end, the first thing I needed was a rivet press!! So, armed with various pieces of steel I made myself one!
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This has been made so that I can locate it in the lathe chuck, and use the cross slide and top slide (locked at 90 degrees to the cross slide) to allow evenly spaced rivets to be pressed into some sheet material.
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So today, I have done just that. A piece of 0.005" brass was cut roughly to size and mounted on the lathe and a good many rivets pressed in at a 0.020" separation. Once all of the rivets were pressed, the brass was finished to size and rolled to the profile of the saddle - I had previously fretted out a pair of formers of the correct profile for the front and rear of the saddle (one will actually be the smokebox front eventually) - and the whole lot soldered up. Below are a couple of photos complete with the requisite coin of the realm to illustrate the size.
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Now I've managed to prove that my riveter works, and that I can form the saddle the next stage will be to begin work on the chassis. For this I will utilise the same method as I did for my Metro Tank, and will mill up a solid brass chassis albeit retaining the standard 2mm scale split axle methodology of construction.

Ian
  • Craftsmanship/Clever x 23
  • Like x 5





A... riveting... yarn Ian.

Somebody had to say it.

A... riveting... yarn Ian.

Somebody had to say it.

Yes Andy, and that someone had to be you :-)  See you tomorrow.

I only wish I could get my 4mm stuff to look as neat :)

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6892 Oakhill Grange
Aug 03 2015 17:30
Somewhat humbled!

Wow Ian, I think the term model engineering applies here. That rivet press in itself is a beautiful piece of work. And as you say, the rivets mean a lot on a GWR saddle tank. I also like the formers, another critical aspect. Is there some kind of non-visible former in the middle as well?

I only wish I could get my 4mm stuff to look as neat :)

Mike, Thank you.  It's just care and patience really.  Although since taking the photos a more careful study shows that the central row of rivets is not on the centre line of the saddle so I think I need to do it all again!!!

 

 

Somewhat humbled!

 

Thank you.  Isn't that a space telescope? ;-)

 

 

Wow Ian, I think the term model engineering applies here. That rivet press in itself is a beautiful piece of work. And as you say, the rivets mean a lot on a GWR saddle tank. I also like the formers, another critical aspect. Is there some kind of non-visible former in the middle as well?

 

Mikkel, Thank you for the kind comment.  There are only the two formers (one at each end of the saddle), despite being only 0.005" brass the saddle is remarkably robust - probably because it is only 37mm long.  I suspect that rolling the profile into the brass has also work hardened it a little too (although I purposely didn't try to anneal it to make the rolling easier because I was worried that it might crush to easily once formed!)

If I hadn't seen your work for myself I would find it hard to believe. A very nice riveter too.

Don

If I hadn't seen your work for myself I would find it hard to believe. A very nice riveter too.

Don

Don, thank you for the kind comments!

Hi Ian, been on holiday and offline for a while, so good to see your post now I'm back :-) The riveting tool looks a very well engineered piece of kit and I'm sure will be very useful. I'm looking forward to following the Buffalo build, there's something rather lovely about outside cranked saddle tanks!:-) I reckon you should tackle a River class next, just think of those beriveted frames:-) Dave

Thanks for the info Ian - and another vote here for a River next ;-)

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