Jump to content


Google Ads are only seen by non-members of RMweb - Create an RMweb account and you'll only receive modelling ads.

Photo
- - - - -

N Gauge Modular Standards





  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 justin1985

justin1985

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 641 posts

Posted 26 September 2010 - 20:12

I've been thinking for a long time about starting to put together some kind of modular layout, both as I live in a small rented flat and lack space, and as I collect\model both British and Continental N gauge (as well as 2mmFS...). For now I could, say, build one English and one Swedish module both using PECO code 55 and run them together, possibly with a pair of return loops.

Primarily I'm thinking of building a modular system not to add modules to a larger project, but simply as a convenient way of building something within my constraints. It seems like it would make sense to follow some kind of defined standard though, so I could contribute them to a larger setup at some point, and just to ensure consistency.

It seems like there is a wide range of standards though! As far as I can discover through Google, the two primary standards are:

Within those most seem to have many derivatives, for one or two track, rail standards, landform profile etc - it all seems quite confusing!

The FREMO standards seem better documented (although primarily in German) and more "open". End profiles, for example are freely available: www.finescale.org . The profiles also appear to be available "off the shelf" in laser cut ply for a reasonable EUR10-11 (plus an unknown amount for postage!) Harald Brosch

Does anyone have experience of using either of these standards though? I am leaning toward the FREMO standard, but would I be out on a limb using it in the UK? Have I missed out any other standards?

Google Ads are only seen by non-members of RMweb - Create an RMweb account and you'll only receive modelling ads.

#2 McRuss

McRuss

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 513 posts
  • LocationLohr, Germany

Posted 26 September 2010 - 20:33

Hello Justin,

I'm using FREMO Module Profiles for my Isle of Skye Railway, and also for my german module Wuerzburger Strasse. Because the FREMO norm is firstly intended for european modelrailways, it maybe the better choice.
Here my homepage
My link
sorry that only the IoS Gazette is partly in english.
I've asked a friend for the link to an english version of the FREMO N-RE norm.

Markus

#3 DavidB-AU

DavidB-AU

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2,029 posts
  • LocationBrisbane, Australia

Posted 27 September 2010 - 03:51

Don't forget T-TRAK. It originated in Japan and was adapted in the USA. It has boomed in Australia over the last 3 years and is now starting to take off in parts of Europe. Europe is adapting the Australian standards as they are well documented and released under Creative Commons.

Cheers
David

#4 justin1985

justin1985

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 641 posts

Posted 27 September 2010 - 09:53

Thanks for the feedback Marus and David,

T-TRAK does look interesting, and well documented and designed, but I am put off by the mandated code-80 KATO UniTrack. While I think UniTrack is great for tabletop setups, I think I would prefer to do my own ballasting etc. on a permanent board.

Am I right in thinking that FREMO N-RE uses the same end profiles as all of the other FREMO-N standards? As far as I can work out from my limited German (and Google Translate) the different groups within FREMO-N differ primarily on rail standards (code 40/55/80) and operating period and style, but the physical boards are the same?

The other thing I haven't quite worked out with the FREMO standards is the roadbed. Obviously with T-TRAK the UniTrack takes care of this, but on the FREMO standard it looks as if a ply roadbed sits on top of the end boards? Or is it inside of them?

Many thanks!

Justin

#5 Steven B

Steven B

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1,126 posts

Posted 27 September 2010 - 11:49

Have I missed out any other standards?


A couple of the N Gauge Society Area Groups (and former area groups) have modular standards.

http://www.esng.co.uk/modules.htm
http://www.wsng.co.uk/

http://www.yorkshire...Guide_Ver_2.pdf

These are all loosly based on the N Track standards.

Modules from the Yorkshire Area Group (over 50' split between two layout) will be on show during our open weekend on the 23/24th October. More details via the website: http://www.yorkshirengauge.org.uk/

Happy modelling.

Steven B.

#6 McRuss

McRuss

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 513 posts
  • LocationLohr, Germany

Posted 27 September 2010 - 16:58

Hello Justin,

the modul profiles are all the same at the different FREMO N Groups. The difference is the track. For example at FREMO N-RE we use Peco Code 55 track, at FREMO 160 they use Code 40 track and finescale wheels.
As soon as I got the link from my friend, I will post it.

Markus

#7 McRuss

McRuss

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 513 posts
  • LocationLohr, Germany

Posted 29 September 2010 - 18:18

Hello Justin,

her is the Link to the english FREMO N-RE norm.

My link

Markus

#8 Etched Pixels

Etched Pixels

    Member


  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1,866 posts
  • LocationSwansea, Wales

Posted 01 October 2010 - 16:57

Thanks for the feedback Marus and David,

T-TRAK does look interesting, and well documented and designed, but I am put off by the mandated code-80 KATO UniTrack. While I think UniTrack is great for tabletop setups, I think I would prefer to do my own ballasting etc. on a permanent board.

Am I right in thinking that FREMO N-RE uses the same end profiles as all of the other FREMO-N standards? As far as I can work out from my limited German (and Google Translate) the different groups within FREMO-N differ primarily on rail standards (code 40/55/80) and operating period and style, but the physical boards are the same?

The other thing I haven't quite worked out with the FREMO standards is the roadbed. Obviously with T-TRAK the UniTrack takes care of this, but on the FREMO standard it looks as if a ply roadbed sits on top of the end boards? Or is it inside of them?

Many thanks!

Justin


T really started off as a tram standard around Kato track and joiners. It's neat for microlayout sort of stuff (and you can ballast up Kato track nicely) but it's not geometrically great in many ways.







Google Ads are only seen by non-members of RMweb - Create an RMweb account and you'll only receive modelling ads.