Jump to content
Following a software upgrade the Classifieds section is out of action. I'm working to resolve this. ×
 
  • entries
    157
  • comments
    894
  • views
    116,578

Ince & Mayhew’s factory – part 2


Job's Modelling

866 views

First an introduction to the factory in the background of the diorama. Darrel Fincher is working here as a metal worker. In the archives of the Northall Gazette I found an interesting article about the factory.

 

 

blogentry-11675-0-29257200-1398965310_thumb.jpg

 

Modelling progress (I had some extra time):

I’m very content with the use of bookbinding glue. Althought it is a little more work the result is much better. With PRITT glue I had always parts that I had to glue again. Applying a thin coat of bookbinding glue gives a good result.

I used the method described in the last entry.

 

blogentry-11675-0-91961100-1398965390_thumb.jpg

 

Although I had printed all factory sheets on Lana Dessin paper, I decided to use another kind of paper for the concrete ledge cover layers. For them I used Hahnemühle watercolour paper 150 g/m2 rough. This paper is acid free and age resistant.

If you have a look on the internet for hand colouring inkjet papers you will see that they advise also the use of watercolour paper for starting professional photographers who want to do some hand colouring on black and white pictures.

I believe it trying out different kind of papers for card modelling can give some surprising results. I don’t know of the difference is to see on the picture. The watercolour paper has much more structure and a far deeper colour. I think my cartridges will go empty a little bit quicker, but that is worth it.

 

blogentry-11675-0-05214800-1398965715_thumb.jpg

 

The two lighter ones are printed on Lana Paper.

Below a picture of the modelling progress of the factory at this moment.

 

blogentry-11675-0-94596000-1398965856_thumb.jpg

 

Next step will be the weathering of the front of the factory and making some thouhts about how to do the finishing of the windows.

To be continued.

 

Regards,

Job

  • Like 3

7 Comments


Recommended Comments

Like you, I use bookbinder's glue and find it very effective.  I do not understand why so many modellers turn to plastic card when 'real' card is more stable, with less tendency to warp, and can easily be printed using an ink-jet printer. 

 

Of course, you do have to keep the model dry!

 

Mike

Link to comment

Like you, I use bookbinder's glue and find it very effective.  I do not understand why so many modellers turn to plastic card when 'real' card is more stable, with less tendency to warp, and can easily be printed using an ink-jet printer. 

 

Of course, you do have to keep the model dry!

 

Mike

 

Thanks for your kind  supportive comment,

I agree completely with you. Building with real card can be done with non-toxic materials and can give very convincing results.

Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold

You are definetely proving that!

 

I was intrigued by the story of Ince and Mayhem, and how they parted ways. It sounds almost as if you know one of them?

Link to comment

You are definetely proving that!

 

I was intrigued by the story of Ince and Mayhem, and how they parted ways. It sounds almost as if you know one of them?

 

Thanks, Mikkel. I will write a PDF in the style of the index in the blog of David Neat with the materials I used for Station Road. I will publish this when this diorama is finished.

 

Just back from a shopping trip with my wife and (a long time ago) adopted daughter (musician and composer). We really like to share, so they accompanied me to the art shop to buy a new Swan Morton Holder no.3 and some card.

I also "scored" some free pass par-tout card too. 

 

The story is roughly based on the life of the Dutch designer and fitted in the history of Northall. 

Link to comment
  • RMweb Gold

Aha, I did sense a real life between the lines.

 

Sounds nice that you are able to share some aspects of the modelling with your family. When my kids were small the modelling was a way of getting a bit of time on my own, but now I'm beginning to regret I didn't involve them a bit more. 

Link to comment
  • RMweb Premium

Another informative blog.

 

I thought the Gazette and your Mr Coverdale's article brilliant.  Really adds another dimension to this layout.

 

As to card modelling, I tend to use slightly watered down PVA for texture papers and after add a liberal application of Acrylic matt varnish.  Card is excellent stuff to use as it doesn't tend to warp and literally lasts years.  I know of one story of a fire in a house - the layout was in the room next to the where the fire was and was fortunately put out before it breached the connecting door - however, a lot of the plastic models melted under the intense heat, but the carboard models survived intact with very little smoke damage!

 

Great stuff as usual Job.

Link to comment

Another informative blog.

 

I thought the Gazette and your Mr Coverdale's article brilliant.  Really adds another dimension to this layout.

 

As to card modelling, I tend to use slightly watered down PVA for texture papers and after add a liberal application of Acrylic matt varnish.  Card is excellent stuff to use as it doesn't tend to warp and literally lasts years.  I know of one story of a fire in a house - the layout was in the room next to the where the fire was and was fortunately put out before it breached the connecting door - however, a lot of the plastic models melted under the intense heat, but the carboard models survived intact with very little smoke damage!

 

Great stuff as usual Job.

 

Thanks for your informative reply.

I think at the end the choice of how to glue is personal. After I had used PRITT glue  from my starting point of card modeling, I liked to try something different. The advice I got was to use a PH neutral glue, also for gluing the photographic art papers I used for the sky . That is why I use the book binders glue this time. 

Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...