Jump to content
 
  • entries
    92
  • comments
    475
  • views
    77,682

The whys and wherefores


Pugsley

948 views

This new blog format has deluded me into thinking that people may be interested in the reasons behind what I do, the inspirations and how it all started, really. They probably aren't, but I'm going to do it anyway :D

 

It really started with the introduction of the Hornby Class 50, back in 2003. I'd had a model railway before, but sold up in 1993/1994 to start modelling US prototypes due to the superior models available. That too soon fell by the wayside once girls, cars and beer were discovered.

 

The 50's were a firm favourite of mine from the days when I lived near the GWML and saw them regularly, and then from bashing the Exeter-Waterloo line in their final days. The release of the Hornby 50, to a higher standard than the US models I had, was an eye-opener, so the first releases were duly purchased. I was originally approaching from a collectors point of view, but soon realised I wanted more.

 

During the time of my interest in US modelling, I bought Model Railroader every month, which was full of inspiring articles - it seemed light years ahead of Railway Modeller at the time, every month they'd have the 'Trackside Photos' section, where there would be some ultra realistic photos, similar to this:

http://www.modelrailroadphotos.com/photos/showphoto.php?photo=3764

 

There was also the annual photo contest, which took these photos to another level, with superb modelling and photography.

http://www.trains.com/mrr/image.ashx?img=mrr-tp0108_01.jpg&w=600

 

I wanted to achieve that kind of result, but railways soon got left behind. Once I rediscovered them, eventually I rediscovered this quest for realism as well, which happened around 2005 and is what lead me to both EM gauge, and weathering. I started searching around the Internet, and happened upon a couple of very interesting sites. The first was Mellow Mike:

http://www.mellowmike.com/

 

Amazing models, and very realistic. He's comes across as a bit up himself though (the old site wasn't as bad as the new one for that!) - no details about techniques, but plenty of inspiration. He is very good indeed:

http://www.mellowmike.com/FR8_Cars/MRL50036_P1.html

http://www.mellowmike.com/FR8_Cars/MRL54035_P2.html

http://www.mellowmike.com/FR8_Cars/SOO_4Posed.html

 

Inspired by what I found, I then discovered the Model Trains Weathered site, and forum. Now subscription only, I learnt a lot in terms of new materials and techniques, and the members there were very good at constructively criticising what I'd done.

http://modeltrainsweathered.com/

 

It was there that I learnt of the work of a guy called John Pitts. His structures were amazing, but what really captured my imagination, and inspired me to have a go, was this SD45T-2, in proper Southern Pacific condition:

77303067.530HqFq1.03_13_05_01vi.jpg

More pictures here:

http://www.pbase.com/lumixfz30/abandonedreabuilding

 

I then subsequently discovered some military modelling sites, and the models of Mig Jimenez, amongst others, which really leads me to where I am now. I think I'll leave it there - I should imagine anyone who started reading this has given up by now :lol:

 

I leave you with this - my first attempt - it wasn't bad, considering, but I realise that both the techniques, and definitely the photography :blink: have improved an awful lot.

 

blogentry-0-12570992314718_thumb.jpg

 

Hopefully this has been of interest to somebody. :icon_mrgreen:

  • Like 1

10 Comments


Recommended Comments

Like you I wandered across the pond to collect books and repaint USA diesels locos of mostly Athearn manufacture a few years ago. Your Cotton Belt Tunnel Motor looks absolutely the bees knees with the accumilated soot, oil and heat stains from constant negotiation of tunnels.

 

One of the first threads I came across that gelled when I joined the old RMweb in 2007 was your's on weathering BR steam outline locos. Before long I was following in your footsteps. Your models were a great inspiration and today, I wouldnt dream of placing a new model on the layout without first giving it at least some "Pugsley" treatment!

 

Larry G.

 

 

Link to comment

:huh: Wow, I'm not quite sure what to say to that! At no stage did I ever imagine that I'd have inspired one of the most renowned modellers in the hobby. :blush: I'm glad I have though, I put my stuff here in the hope that it inspires others, and it's nice to know that it does.

 

I must point out that the Tunnel Motor is nothing to do with me - it's by a guy called John Pitts, it was just one of my biggest inspirations. I will do a Tunnel Motor one day, just to see if I can do one as well as that, but that's a long way down the 'tuit' pile :)

Link to comment
:huh: Wow, I'm not quite sure what to say to that! At no stage did I ever imagine that I'd have inspired one of the most renowned modellers in the hobby. :blush: I'm glad I have though, I put my stuff here in the hope that it inspires others, and it's nice to know that it does.

 

I must point out that the Tunnel Motor is nothing to do with me - it's by a guy called John Pitts, it was just one of my biggest inspirations. I will do a Tunnel Motor one day, just to see if I can do one as well as that, but that's a long way down the 'tuit' pile :)

You also inspire some of us cr@p modellers too mate :lol:, my weathering has come on a bit having read your threads & a few others (PMP & D7093) to name a couple :icon_clap:

.............Keep up the good work B) B) B):icon_thumbsup2:

 

All the best

 

Phill :icon_wave:

Link to comment
  • RMweb Premium

Damn you sir <_< !

I've just read through your blog and have realised just how far I have to improve to attain the levels you reach.

Truly inspirational.

 

Andrew

Link to comment
I should imagine anyone who started reading this has given up by now

I am still reading with interest, and exploring the links you have provided, thanks

Dave

Link to comment

This has been very interesting to look through. I never think to look that closely at overseas modelling but some of the results achieved are simply stunning, I have certainly got some ideas from this and I although I have done some weathering to my stock it takes me forever to do and I still have a lot to learn to get up to your standard - certainly inspiring though!

 

Mark

 

 

Link to comment

Hi Pugsley,

Thanks for sharing, it was interesting. One of my first posts on RMweb was on your workbench thread. Your weathering techniques have inspired me. I now use Acrylic paints far more than I ever did, and I am getting some good results.biggrin.gif Those US modellers certainly know how to weather stuff.

 

Cheers Peter,

Link to comment

Wow, thanks everyone - I wasn't expecting such a response to this B)

 

Phill - I dunno about rubbish, that 47 you did recently looked really good.

 

I genuinely think that most people can do what I do - the biggest thing you have to learn is how to interpret photos, and work out what you're looking at. The techniques you then use to replicate that are almost incidental. There is also normally more than one way of doing something, too. It's something that comes with practice - I've learnt a lot since I did the 50, above.

Link to comment

Hi Martin

 

I like both the Blog and Thread format for the new RMWeb, I think both have a place. As for your Bloging, I say keep it up!

 

I think with what you do on your workbench (and the new layout I hope) and the way you share it with us will be much easier to follow on your Blog, but that is just my view.

 

I also like the fact that you are using the Blog Index pane, a very powerful feature of Blogs (you can't do that on a Thread, I think). It makes Blogs so much more user friendly to navigate especially with the OMWB work.

 

Keep the good work up.

 

Regards

Paul

Link to comment

Yes, I think I'm going to persevere with the blog format, in the hope that modifications to the software in time allow them to become a little more integrated with the main forum.

 

I had to put an index in there, I normally flit from project to project so it would get quite confusing without it! You could do something similar on a conventional thread by continually adding to the first post, I suppose.

Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...