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About this blog

A record of weathering work, intended to show both good and bad results, including explanations of what is used and how.

Entries in this blog

 

Peckett W4 No. 883. Step 6.

The paint finish on this model as supplied is very good, but satin. The idea with the weathering to be done is to present a well looked after locomotive, so the satin finish needs to be altered to a shiny one, but not uniformly so. The cab sides and bunker have been polished with a gentle application of isopropyl alcohol (IPA) on a Tamiya cotton swab. These swabs are very tightly bound and shaped, the ones that I normally use being pointed at the tip. This shape allows me to be quite precise wit

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

There's a first time for everything.

Exploring the blog concept with a view to maintaining a record of weathering processes, materials, tools and techniques. Entries will be sporadic and entirely dependent upon time and memory.

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Accurascale Cemflo. Step 6 - Finishing Details.

Accurascale Cemflo. Step 6 - Finishing Details.

Final touches include the wiping of the pigment brush, which still has a residue of light grey pigment on it, over horizontal and protruding surfaces. Note that this does not mean that the brush is dipped in pigment at all, we just make use of the miniscule traces that are still embedded in the bristles. A bit like dry brushing with paint.   The Blue Circle board on the tank has also been rubbed with the pigment brush, in vertical streaks, to replicate the dusty buildup of cement dust.
 

Quick Advertisement.

D3721 and Peckett No. 883 will be at the Hornby Magazine Great Electric Train Show this weekend, so if you plan on going, come and see how/if they differ from the photographs.       Look for a bloke doing weathering demonstrations. Point and snigger all you like, he won't mind He'll have his back to you.

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Bachmann COV AB / VDA van. A Change of Plan.

Having been shown the error of my ways by not fading the van before starting, I shall be embarking on another project where I do fade first. This project was completed as an exercise in using the MIG Dark Wash in all sorts of ways to represent a grimy COV AB.     The roof has been airbrushed with slightly thinned wash, applied as four thin coats and left to dry between each coat. This resulted in a very soft texture that was easily but not completely removed, leaving a slight brownish disco

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. Step 5 - Windows.

Even though the car is pretty grotty, I thought that the driver might make an effort to keep the windows clean. Clean white spirit has been used to remove the Dullcote layer. Soaking a cocktail stick (wooden variety) in the white spirit will allow a gentle rubbing action to gradually remove the dried Dullcote a little at a time, and if you don't go right into the corners it can leave an accumulation of 'dirt' there. The tiny flakes that will be left adhering to the plastic windows through static

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Bachmann COV AB / VDA van. Introduction.

The subject has been chosen and a colour photograph found to work from. Bachmann produced several livery versions of the 29 ton sliding door box van (COV AB, later VDA )and this one (38-141) is in Railfreight livery, numbered 200077. Paul Bartlett has many photographs of these on his website, and has given his permission for this photograph to be used in this blog.     The challenges are: Fade the reddish shade of brown to show age and wear Highlight areas of accumulated dirt Represe

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Oxford Diecast JCB C3X 1980s - Step 3. A Light Coloured Pigment.

Oxford Diecast JCB C3X 1980s - Step 3. A Light Coloured Pigment.

The application of Europe Earth pigment is intended to represent a dusty coating of dirt picked up while operating in a relatively clean, but damp, area. The pigment was applied using a filbert brush that had taken powder from the lid of the pot. The vehicle was laid on its side and the brush held above each wheel in turn, and the brush tapped gently to dislodge the pigment so that it fell into the still wet wash from step 2.This conglomeration was then left to dry. The inevitable additional dep

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

A Land Rover Series 1 109". Introduction.

Ever since failing my driving test for the second time, in a Land Rover in Cyprus (exotic lifestyle!), I have had a soft spot for the machines. When at Railex in 2017 I found an Oxford Diecast 1/43rd version and decided to use it for a minimum cost weathering exercise.   The idea was to spend as little as possible to weather this model, but end up with the wherewithal to continue weathering as many more models as possible with the materials purchased. My purchases were:   Testor's Dullcote -

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

D3721. The Summary.

In response to a recent request, there follows a summary of materials used in this project with the blog entry numbers where they appeared.   Railmatch Frame Dirt - Step 3.   AMMO by Mig Panel Line Wash Black Night - Step 12.   Railmatch Weathered Black - Steps 13 and 15.   AK Interactive Fresh Engine Oil - Steps 14 and 21.   MIG Productions Dark Mud - Step 18.   MIG Productions Track Brown - Step 18.   MIG Productions Black Smoke - Steps 18 and 22.   There is another photograph

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Peckett W4 No. 883. Introduction.

A casual enquiry at Scaleforum this weekend has brought forward the idea of working on one of Hornby's Peckett W4 models. What do you think should be tackled? Looked after or neglected?  

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Peckett W4 No. 883. Temporary Diversion.

Before starting work on this locomotive I decided to remove the rather large supplied couplings. My original intention was to simply have no couplings at all, but then I noticed that there is a coupling hook on both buffer beams, albeit grossly over scale. A delve into a box labelled 'Couplings', that hasn't been opened for years (because it contains, mainly, supplied couplings from RTR rolling stock) revealed the presence of a couple of packets of Roger Smith unassembled 3-link couplings. A qui

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. Step 2 - Rust Spots.

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. Step 2 - Rust Spots.

For some time now I have been meaning to have a go with a microbrush. I'm sure they've been on sale for years, and been used by thousands of modellers for all sorts of useful things, but I've never had a go. Until now. By applying a very small amount of wash from the tip of the rigger brush, I was able to just about colour the tiny bristles of the microbrush. The tip was then poked carefully at areas of the car where I thought rust would form. I have no photograph of a rusty SunbeamTalbot 90 to

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

GWR 70' Post Office Sorting Van - Step 1. Introduction.

GWR 70' Post Office Sorting Van - Step 1. Introduction.

Something a little bit different, for me, at least.   This coach is to be lightly weathered, to represent a vehicle running in the 1930s. I don't envisage using large quantities of anything, but the difficulty will be to portray a very light coat of dirt without making it look blotchy.   I plan to use pigment for most of the work - AK Interactive Dark Earth. Application will be done using small brushes, probably a round no. 2 and a filbert no. 2 or 4. Being a panelled coach,
 

Accurascale O Gauge HUO. Step 6 - The Rust Gets a Hold.

The old rust application is now finished. Greater volume of pigment (although still only small quantities at a time) has been applied in corners and at edges, and now it is time to add a different tone of rust where more recent corrosion is taking place. For this stage I am using MIG Dark Mud. Once again, small quantities at a time and gentle application, building up the effect gradually.   You'll have noticed that there is plenty to do on the underframe.    

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Bachmann COV AB / VDA van. Preparation.

The plan is to use a dark wash and a couple of pigments to replicate as much of the dirt as possible that can be seen in the photograph. There may need to be some additions as I progress, but they will be identified as and when appropriate.      

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Bachmann Air-Braked Vans - Summary.

And finally . . . .   Here's a photograph of the two vans together, so that you can see the similarities and differences between them.     Very little material has been used on both subjects but, nonetheless, the effects have produced vehicles that have been in use for some time and suffered the ravages of time and weather. Both would probably benefit from some more work on the roof, but that would merely be an additional thin coat or two of Dark Wash, left to dry and then rubbed with a s

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Peckett W4 No. 883. Step 1.

In much the same way as D3721 was started, the loco is upside down in a foam cradle and has been airbrushed with Railmatch Sleeper Grime, the enamel version. The wheels were rotated 1/4 turn after each light spray so that there were no shadow areas behind wheels or motion. This process also helps the pickup wipers to clear the wet paint from the rear of the wheels if any strays that far.   The airbrush in use this time is an Iwata HP-SB Plus, one of my two favourites, which allows me to be qui

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Peckett W4 No. 883. Step 5.

It's all been left to dry properly for 36 hours.   To represent well worn but properly maintained underparts, a layer of AK Interactive Fresh Engine Oil has been brushed onto the rods and wheels. This fluid has some strange characteristics in that it will react with not-quite-dry enamels and make them wrinkly (maybe I should not get quite so close to the bottle in future ). Once again, to keep the applied layer even and consistent, the wheels were rotated during the process with the PP9 batt

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 2. Wash.

The first thing done with high gloss diecast models is to add the wash, if dirty areas are to be depicted. It's done at this stage because enamel washes work very well on a high gloss surface. Using the rigger brush and my trusty Mig Productions Dark Wash (because I can't find the one I bought to do the original Land Rover!) I've added fluid to all the corners, edges, lumps and bumps to highlight detail and prepare for dirty areas. Note that there are many blobs and runs that look a right mess.

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

A Land Rover Series 1 of indeterminate length. Step 9. Summary.

That's all I plan to do with this subject, remembering that it was an exercise in weathering for as little cost as possible/practical.   I have attempted to clear an area of windscreen where the wiper would have cleaned, but on reflection (!) that was not such a good idea. The wheels were only made muddy on one side.     Just for comparison, the topic started here:   http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/blog/2349/entry-21469-a-land-rover-series-1-109-introduction/

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

GWR 70' Post Office Sorting Van - Step 5. The Underframe.

GWR 70' Post Office Sorting Van - Step 5. The Underframe.

The panels and the rest of the sides are now completed, and it's time to attend to the underframe. The shade of black used to paint the underparts represents a fairly worn state, so the only work required is to add something to break up the evenness of colour. Once again, AK Interactive Dark Earth pigment is used for this in the main, but some small amounts of MIG Productions Russian Earth were used as well. When looking at the carriage through a camera lens the difference is barely noticeable,
 

Accurascale O Gauge HUO. Step 9 - Interior Afterthought.

I mentioned in the beginning that this blog would record good and bad. Here is an example of the latter.   You have probably noticed an absence of interior shots for this hopper. Firstly, it didn't turn out as I wanted it and, secondly, the photographs are completely out of focus.   You can verify that now:    
Accurascale Cemflo. Step 4 - Encrustation 2.

Accurascale Cemflo. Step 4 - Encrustation 2.

The idea of using the Dullcote is to create a quick-drying sticky surface upon which the pigment can be plonked. Sorry for being technical.   No attempt has been made to be careful where the pigment goes because the Dullcote dries very fast, and the pigment needs to land on it while it's still wet. You would have been amused had you been able to see me struggling to spray Dullcote, plonk (sorry again) pigment and take a photograph all in the space of 10 seconds.    It looks a
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