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About this blog

A record of weathering work, intended to show both good and bad results, including explanations of what is used and how.

Entries in this blog

GWR 70' Post Office Sorting Van - Step 2. Materials and Tools.

GWR 70' Post Office Sorting Van - Step 2. Materials and Tools.

The main pigment to be used for this model is AK Interactive Dark Earth. This choice comes from studying photographs of lightly weathered brown and cream coaching stock from many eras, including preservation examples. The paint finish on the model is such that it will hold pigment very well, so care will need to be taken in where it goes in the first place.   Most of the application will be done using a normal round (or candle flame) brush, size 2. This gives a fairly narrow point for
GWR 70' Post Office Sorting Van - Step 1. Introduction.

GWR 70' Post Office Sorting Van - Step 1. Introduction.

Something a little bit different, for me, at least.   This coach is to be lightly weathered, to represent a vehicle running in the 1930s. I don't envisage using large quantities of anything, but the difficulty will be to portray a very light coat of dirt without making it look blotchy.   I plan to use pigment for most of the work - AK Interactive Dark Earth. Application will be done using small brushes, probably a round no. 2 and a filbert no. 2 or 4. Being a panelled coach,
Accurascale Cemflo. Step 6 - Finishing Details.

Accurascale Cemflo. Step 6 - Finishing Details.

Final touches include the wiping of the pigment brush, which still has a residue of light grey pigment on it, over horizontal and protruding surfaces. Note that this does not mean that the brush is dipped in pigment at all, we just make use of the miniscule traces that are still embedded in the bristles. A bit like dry brushing with paint.   The Blue Circle board on the tank has also been rubbed with the pigment brush, in vertical streaks, to replicate the dusty buildup of cement dust.
Accurascale Cemflo. Step 5 - Underframe (Details).

Accurascale Cemflo. Step 5 - Underframe (Details).

The holes in the underframe strengthening plates presented a small problem. How do you get an even coverage of paint on the solebars that will be seen behind the plates? I put the nozzle of the airbrush right up against the holes and sprayed through them onto the solebar. The consistency of the paint allowed it to spread far enough inside the gap to cover the whole area.   The Railmatch frame dirt was applied first, to give an overall tint to the whole area. Wheels were done by using t
Accurascale Cemflo. Step 5 - Underframe.

Accurascale Cemflo. Step 5 - Underframe.

It's the turn of the underframe. Railmatch Weathered Black and Frame Dirt are used in this case. A first layer of frame dirt is followed by a second layer of weathered black/frame dirt mixture, giving some variation of colour to random areas of the chassis.    
Accurascale Cemflo. Step 4 - Encrustation 4.

Accurascale Cemflo. Step 4 - Encrustation 4.

Cement dust builds up gradually on the tank sides, forming a crust as time and precipitation both do their work. In places the weight of this buildup is too much for the grip of the gunk on the metal of the tank, and lumps fall off. On the model this effect can be shown by using a cocktail stick, or similar precision tool, to chip away at the previously created mess. The pointed end will remove small areas at a time, or it can be used at a much shallower angle to reduce the height of the lumps m
Accurascale Cemflo. Step 4 - Encrustation 3.

Accurascale Cemflo. Step 4 - Encrustation 3.

Once the Dullcote has dried, the pigment is well and truly stuck. Working with an old filbert brush, the mess is being reduced to smaller lumps by the simple expedient of rubbing the lumps down to size. The harder you rub the smaller they become. Notice the piece of paper in a nice shade of pink. This is being used to capture the powder falling off the tank, so that it can be re-used.
Accurascale Cemflo. Step 4 - Encrustation 2.

Accurascale Cemflo. Step 4 - Encrustation 2.

The idea of using the Dullcote is to create a quick-drying sticky surface upon which the pigment can be plonked. Sorry for being technical.   No attempt has been made to be careful where the pigment goes because the Dullcote dries very fast, and the pigment needs to land on it while it's still wet. You would have been amused had you been able to see me struggling to spray Dullcote, plonk (sorry again) pigment and take a photograph all in the space of 10 seconds.    It looks a
Accurascale Cemflo. Step 4 - Encrustation 1.

Accurascale Cemflo. Step 4 - Encrustation 1.

Preparation for the cement application. Materials to be used now are Testor's Dullcote and Lifecolor N. Europe Dust pigment. I searched through many pigments to find a suitable grey cement powder colour, and this one is the closest (to my eye) I could find.    
Accurascale Cemflo. Step 2 - Oxidisation.

Accurascale Cemflo. Step 2 - Oxidisation.

The bright shiny aluminium bodies of Cemflos soon turned dull through the oxidisation of the metal surface. My original plan was to represent this by using Testor's Dullcote, but a friend mentioned that he planned to apply a coat of Lifecolor Tensocrom White Oxide to his models, so I thought I'd unashamedly copy his idea. Very little of what weathering I do is my own idea, nearly everything is copied from somewhere or somebody else.   Tensocrom acrylic paints are semi-opaque colours th
Accurascale Cemflo. Step 1 - Introduction.

Accurascale Cemflo. Step 1 - Introduction.

This splendid model will be the next topic.   I have already tried to weather one of these but am not completely happy with the result, which can be seen below.    The next attempt will use the following products:   Testor's Dullcote Lifecolor N Europe Dust Ammo by Mig Light Dust Railmatch Frame Dirt Railmatch Weathered Black MIG Productions Black Smoke   The model will be depicted at a later stage in its life but still before TOPS
 

Accurascale O Gauge HUO. Step 9 - Interior Afterthought.

I mentioned in the beginning that this blog would record good and bad. Here is an example of the latter.   You have probably noticed an absence of interior shots for this hopper. Firstly, it didn't turn out as I wanted it and, secondly, the photographs are completely out of focus.   You can verify that now:    
Oxford Diecast JCB C3X - Photograph Only

Oxford Diecast JCB C3X - Photograph Only

Yesterday (Sunday 28th April) I had the good fortune to visit the RMweb South West Area Group's Members' Day in Taunton. What a blast!   During my early walkabout (I had a late one as well) I visited Lord & Butler's stand and found a JCB, all bright, shiny and yellow. I decided to use it as an example of what could be done with a few materials - Testor's Dullcote, MIG Productions Industrial City Dirt, MIG Productions Dark Mud and Railmatch Sleeper Grime. By the end of the day and a

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Accurascale O Gauge HUO. Step 7 - Underframe.

The underframe in my reference photograph doesn't show too much in the way of rust colours, being mostly built-up track grime. To replicate this appearance, I have used a thin airbrushed coat of Railmatch Sleeper Grime to form the basis. There was already some deliberately unmasked overspray from the Revell 84 used on the hopper body at the beginning of the process.   The airbrush (Iwata Eclipse) was held at about 4" from the underframe with the vehicle upside down on the turntable and

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

Accurascale O Gauge HUO. Step 1 - Checking colours.

Accurascale O Gauge HUO. Step 1 - Checking colours.

An O Gauge HUO hopper from Accurascale is the next challenge.   The first thing to do is to choose the colours that will be used for this, and another seven to follow. Each of them will be tackled as a separate task, in the hope that the completed set will all look similar, but definitely not the same as each other.  The plan is to use Revell no. 84 as the basis for the rusty look, MIG pigments Dark Mud and Track Brown for shading in corners and around edges, Railmatch Sleeper Grime fo

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Accurascale O Gauge HUO. Step 6 - The Rust Gets a Hold.

The old rust application is now finished. Greater volume of pigment (although still only small quantities at a time) has been applied in corners and at edges, and now it is time to add a different tone of rust where more recent corrosion is taking place. For this stage I am using MIG Dark Mud. Once again, small quantities at a time and gentle application, building up the effect gradually.   You'll have noticed that there is plenty to do on the underframe.    

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Accurascale O Gauge HUO. Step 5 - The Rust Sets In..

Out come the filbert brush and the MIG pigments.   Track brown is the colour to be used here, for the older rusted areas, and is applied small quantities at a time to build up the deposit where appropriate - mostly corners and edges of panels. By restricting the volume of pigment on the brush some really subtle effects are produced, implying the beginning of holes to come.    

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Accurascale O Gauge HUO. Step 4 - Interior Work.

The random (failed) splattering of the hopper interior has now been treated to a wiping by thinners-dampened 1/2"flat shader. I attempted to keep the wipes vertical because that is the direction water would take any dirt and dust that it encountered. It is quite probable that any effect thus produced will be entirely obliterated by whatever is to follow, but, just in case. . . . . .    This was followed by an airbrushed application of very thin Railmatch Weathered Black - plenty of thi

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Accurascale O Gauge HUO. Step 3 - Removing Rust Spots.

The paint used for the rust spots was enamel, so was easily removed with white spirit. The approach was to place a few drops on the bristles of a 1/2" flat shader brush and then wipe the brush downwards from the top edge of the body, all the way round the hopper. The eventual effect was to remove most of the thinned application but leave the first application of unthinned spots, and leave vertical streaks of residue. Although irritated at the original look, I'm fairly happy with the situation no

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Accurascale O Gauge HUO. Step 2 - Random Rust Spots.

The intended state is 'pretty grotty.'  A few random rust spots would be needed, so an old toothbrush was dipped into the Revell 84. Not too far, just enough to leave some drops on the end of the bristles. An old screwdriver (my tin opener)  was then dragged across the bristles with the brush aimed in the direction of the model. The result was too few random spots, so I dipped the toothbrush in some white spirit before dipping it once again into the 84. Another attempt at the splattering exercis

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. Step 5 - Windows.

Even though the car is pretty grotty, I thought that the driver might make an effort to keep the windows clean. Clean white spirit has been used to remove the Dullcote layer. Soaking a cocktail stick (wooden variety) in the white spirit will allow a gentle rubbing action to gradually remove the dried Dullcote a little at a time, and if you don't go right into the corners it can leave an accumulation of 'dirt' there. The tiny flakes that will be left adhering to the plastic windows through static

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

 

Sunbeam Talbot 90 - Rather Rusty. Step 4 - Pigment 2.

The second application of pigment is AK Interactive Dark Earth. This has been used to represent areas of bodywork where rust is only just starting to show through the paintwork, and also to impart a dusty appearance to the whole model. Note that it has been used on some of the chromed areas (bumpers and hubcaps) to give the impression of rust taking hold. Application was achieved with the filbert brush.      

Mick Bonwick

Mick Bonwick

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