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A Platform building in place.


Dave John

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At last, a platform building with a roof on it. I’m reasonably pleased with the way it has turned out. Close up photos show the odd bit that needs a touch of paint, that always tends to be the case these days.
The final position will depend on how the stairs from the upper building work out but thats pretty much in the right place. I have learned a lot along the way, particularly with regard to messing about with photographic textures and some of the finer points of using the silhouette. I will be interested to see how stable a delicate styrene structure is long term, only time will tell on that one. The figures could do with a spot of matt varnish too. Maybe even a bit of light weathering though at the time I’m modelling the building would be barely 10 years old.

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Anyway, a bit of wagon building next, will seem like a holiday I think.

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Hesitate to make what might be a negative comment, but wondering about the roof slates. Seems quite a large gap between individual slates in a row? Would say that they normally butt up to each other. The rest all looks very impressive! Delicate, square and neat.

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A truly lovely bit of modelling.

And don’t worry about your adding of weathering;

given how heavily industrialised Glasgow was in that era, there would almost certainly be evidence of weathering in a short time.

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A truly lovely bit of modelling.

And don’t worry about your adding of weathering;

given how heavily industrialised Glasgow was in that era, there would almost certainly be evidence of weathering in a short time.

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Thanks all. 

 

Its a valid point 26 power, the slates are a bit of a compromise. I wanted to keep the edge of the slates very thin with a gap of about 2 inches above the lead canopy flashing. Most of the available sheets of slates are too thick and would have not matched the leadwork at the skylights or the chimney flashings. I have individually laid paper slates in the past, but these days I don't think I could get accurate lines of them over that length of the roof. In the end I decided to use "Redutex" sheets. These are very thin and quite long so there is only one join in the whole length of the roof. 

 

I agree though, the gap between individual slates is a bit wide. However to my eye the accuracy of size and straightness of the courses is what I would notice from normal viewing distances.

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  • RMweb Gold

Just been admiring the photos for quite some time, Dave. Superb modelling, so much atmosphere and 100% Edwardian!

 

The Stadden figures look great in that setting. Was the CR stingy with their platform benches? I can only see one - but maybe the GWR boys have nicked them :-)

 

It's all very inspiring. 

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They were a bit stingy Mikkel, the only photos I have show 1 under the canopy and 2 along the platforms. They were longer than the one I have there and I think they had the fancy CR cast ends. I do have some pictures of a preserved example, sometime I might give it to the silhouette as a challenge. 

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  • RMweb Gold

Ah, that's a good idea: Seeing what the Silhouette can do in terms of benches. I look forward to seeing that at some point.

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  • RMweb Gold

Very, very nice!  Love the ornate chimneys.

 

Best wishes

 

Dave

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Tickles my pre-Grouping fancy.

 

Very much enjoying your modelling and the older base figures really make a difference to set the time. Looking forward to seeing more.

:)

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