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Time to transfer...

Magdalen Bridge

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As an experiment, I thought I would try to convert a Cooper Craft 4-planker into a Lot 441 4-planker, of 1888 vintage. First, it needed grease boxes...

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This evening's task was to sort the transfers. To try and keep things central, I worked in from either edge...

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With mixed successes. Naturally, I blame the age of the transfers...

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But I had a model with oil boxes in need of transfers, and no idea of what number to use... until I found a cheat...

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This photo of Calne station, probably c.1903 (Open source, from https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e5/Calne_station_(46631306172).jpg). The conveniently placed log meant I was free to assume 65815 had oil boxes...

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And before long, things started to stack up...

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Things are a bit wonky, and components remain to be added, but as a first go with transfers, I can live with the errors. A modeler's licence, and all that...

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Stacked 4-plankers, feels like a sweet shop :)

 

For what it's worth:  I only press down Pressfix transfes very lightly at first. Then add lots of water, and once the top bit has been removed I use the point of a scalpel to reposition the transfer so that it's straight. Then press down again, and once dry apply Microsol fixing solution. Later a touch of matt varnish.  Never had issues with this even after many years.

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5 hours ago, Mikkel said:

Stacked 4-plankers, feels like a sweet shop :)

 

For what it's worth:  I only press down Pressfix transfes very lightly at first. Then add lots of water, and once the top bit has been removed I use the point of a scalpel to reposition the transfer so that it's straight. Then press down again, and once dry apply Microsol fixing solution. Later a touch of matt varnish.  Never had issues with this even after many years.

Hi Mikkel, 

 

thanks for that very helpful tip. I will give that a go this evening. I have been building the 4-plankers as practice, so tips like that are excellent. When I am confident enough, I have some back-dated 6 wheel siphons that need their transfers; a task I am dreading. In the meantime, heavy weathering of the wonky opens should disguise the worst slips. 

 

 

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Ah yes the siphons can be a pain to letter!

 

Looking forward to seeing them.

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From my reading of Atkins, the change from grease to oil axleboxes for iron minks took place during the construction of Lots 172 and 193, in December 1897. I've assumed that date applies to 4-plank wagons too, so 65815 from Lot 161 is a bit touch-and-go for oil boxes. There is a photo of 67389 of Lot 191 with grease boxes. Both the 4-plankers I've built that have kept their Coopercraft oil axleboxes, 71460 of Lot 220 and 10670 of Lot 355, also have cast numberplates, though 71460 might be a little early for that, as the earliest one with cast plates of which I've seen a photo is 73189 of Lot 287 - with oil axleboxes. I'm afraid I've become a bit of a number and Lot junkie.

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That is wonderfully useful to know. My copy of Atkins et al arrived a few days ago, so I will do some digging. In the meantime, I will try to track down some more Cooper Craft kits.

If I have understood correctly, 71460 of Lot 220 could arguably have oil axleboxes, and yet have painted numbers? I ask because I prefer the painted numbers to plates; I find the plates quite boring. 

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Just now, Magdalen Bridge said:

That is wonderfully useful to know. My copy of Atkins et al arrived a few days ago, so I will do some digging. In the meantime, I will try to track down some more Cooper Craft kits.

If I have understood correctly, 71460 of Lot 220 could arguably have oil axleboxes, and yet have painted numbers? I ask because I prefer the painted numbers to plates; I find the plates quite boring. 

 

Arguably. I think in the pre-1904 livery photos I've seen - by no means an exhaustive collection, all the 4-plank wagons with plates, for which the axleboxes are visible, have oil axleboxes and all those with painted numbers have grease. Can't necessarily read all the numbers in these. I've no proof that 71460 was built with either plates or oil axleboxes though I believe the wagon registers at the NRM could confirm the boxes.

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yes,  I had noticed that the painted numbers always look to have grease boxes in the photos. Good job I have a a stash on order from MJT.

 

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