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POW Sides GER Private Owner Wagon 7mm

 

Thanks to current events,my final year at University has gone mad so work on all modelling project's has had to stop. But fortunately I can see light as I've finished my degree...Phew!! 

 

Just for a change of pace, and knowing my skill set I felt I could build and paint this all in a day, this wagon holds memories to me as it's my home town of Attleborough in Norfolk. This wagon was owned by John Park-Wick's, I managed to find a photo of him in front of his Ford Model T Pickup to take coal from the GE to the local's in the town.

 

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I believe the photo is in what is the current car park at the station, it's hard to tell but having lived and been around the station for so long I feel as if I know the station and surrounding area quite well. 

 

Anyway back to the model...

 

 

The kit came nicely packed and the paint finish on the wagons sides was impressive. 

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The kit is fairly simply to put together the only thing I had to worry about was not to damage the paint work, and to get the under frame and W Irons painted before gluing

 

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Once I had put the W Irons and wagon frame into primer it meant I could focus on putting the rest of the kit together

 

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Next was to focus on the break rigging, a fiddly but fun job, not as fiddly as the last job. 

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And there we have it the wagon built and looking very nice! Just the buffers & couplings to go

 

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And here's the end result, I'm pretty happy with it, I need to get myself some Humbrol 100, those keen eyed will notice a few area's where filing the flash off has scrubbed the paint. Once that's finished I'll give the wagon a coat of Matt Varnish. 

 

 

Anyway that's it for now, until my degree is finished. Once that has happened I can begin to focus on the LNER A3!

 

Thanks

Tom

 

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Looking good. Will you be weathering it once your degree is out of the way?

 

Cheers, Ade.

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1 hour ago, Adrian Stevenson said:

Looking good. Will you be weathering it once your degree is out of the way?

 

Cheers, Ade.

 

I might well do, I'm certainly considering putting a realistic coal load into it. I've not seen any photographs of the wagon, but I'm of the opinion that the owner would have tried to keep it clean. As based on my own knowledge it would have made sense to keep it clean as it acted as poster for the owner and the town. As POW Sides do 2 other GER wagons I may keep them clean too. I'm honestly not sure yet. 

 

But I'll enjoy it all the same :)

 

Thanks

Tom

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PO wagons were often on a a hire and maintenance contract from one of the wagon building companies such as Metropolitan, Birmingham, Gloucester, Charles Roberts, Hurst Nelson, Harrison Camm, &c. The terms might typically be a seven-year lease with a repaint at mid-term - so the paintwork would be no more than three and a half years old. Railway company wagons, in contrast, might be lucky to get repainted on a seven year cycle, so on average their paintwork would look more worn.

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That is a good looking wagon.  At first glance I thought lettering was missing from the door but then I checked the lorry.:pleasantry:

 

PO wagons usually had independent brakes that could be operated from either side but only one side at a time.  There shouldn't be a rod between the two brake sets.   Some had drop doors.

 

I wouldn't worry too much about touching the paint up.  I expect you will weather it.  If your era is BR, these would look very distressed at that time.

 

John

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Compound2632

Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, brossard said:

I wouldn't worry too much about touching the paint up.  I expect you will weather it.  If your era is BR, these would look very distressed at that time.

 

Given that it says GER on the siderail, it must represent the wagon as it was no later than the mid-1920s. GER would be replaced by LNER at the first repaint after grouping. 

 

1 hour ago, brossard said:

PO wagons usually had independent brakes that could be operated from either side but only one side at a time.  There shouldn't be a rod between the two brake sets.   Some had drop doors.

 

If the wagon was built before 1911, it would probably have been built with brakes on one side only. It's possible that by the early 20s it would have been given brakes on the other side too, to comply with the Board of Trade regulations of 1911 - which allowed a period of grace for bringing old wagons up to scratch. These regulations required wagons to have a brake that could be applied from either side but only released from the side from which it had been applied. As Brossard says, for mineral wagons with bottom doors, the simplest (and cheapest) way of achieving this was to fit a second set of brakes, independent of the existing brakes. 

 

If you look at your first picture and think about what happens when the cross-shaft is rotated, you will see that as the brake push-rods are currently connected to the tumblers (the short levers connecting the push rods to the cross-shaft), the brakes would move towards the wheels on one side and away from them on the other. A cross-shaft makes for complicated brakes!

Edited by Compound2632
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19 hours ago, brossard said:

That is a good looking wagon.  At first glance I thought lettering was missing from the door but then I checked the lorry.:pleasantry:

 

PO wagons usually had independent brakes that could be operated from either side but only one side at a time.  There shouldn't be a rod between the two brake sets.   Some had drop doors.

 

I wouldn't worry too much about touching the paint up.  I expect you will weather it.  If your era is BR, these would look very distressed at that time.

 

John

 

Thanks John,

 

I have removed the bar, I should have realized that! But not too worry thank you that has been corrected now :)

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Wagon brakes can be a minefield.  I've lost count of the number of times I messed up.  We learn by doing and, as was pointed out, thinking about the mechanism.

 

John

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