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A CR 670 Class part 6. In service at last.


Dave John

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There are times when I can see the appeal of BR unlined black. About half way through decorating the No. 252 was one such occasion. However bit by bit it all came together. The final result is a bit bright, but the brass does tend to develop a patina of its own over time. As ever close photos show errors the eye misses and it needs some builders plates as well.

 

A few pics ;

 

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Originally built as goods engines in 1878 the class were rebuilt as mixed traffic in the early 1900s, westinghouse fitted and repainted in lined blue. Last members of the second lot were withdrawn in 1932.

 

A bit of video of 252 in a variety of mixed traffic roles.

 

 

 

 

I found that to be a challenging build, but the end result is a bit of a character and a rather nippy wee engine.

 

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I love it. What a great engine and well worth the time and effort. I think you’ve done a brilliant job. 

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Quote

but the end result is a bit of a character and a rather nippy wee engine

 

Certainly is.

40 years ago I was lucky enough to pay an (all too brief) visit to Tony Brenchley's loft, when he was working in Northampton at the same place as my father. It was the first time I had seen such dainty locos, but left an indelible mark on my memory. (Those who know of Tony's interests will realise that the model was of Blairgowrie, in P4, and not actually wired up at that stage!)

 

I feel slightly in lust with them at that point, but having seen that video, it might be full-blown love!

 

So, when do we get to see the other side of it?

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21 minutes ago, Dave John said:

Och , I'll run it up to Yoker or Dawsholm and turn it round....

 

You have lined the other side?

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Mikkel

Posted (edited)

Lovely loco and a very entertaining video. Proper loco chasing, it felt as if I was there - and almost out of breath at one point! 

 

The guard really is a nice touch, adds a bit of life. They were made of stern stuff, those CR men. Especially the driver, running the loco tender first, all on his own, while facing the other way :jester:

 

Edited by Mikkel
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Loved the video and congratulations on a finishing a superb locomotive.

 

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Splendid loco and a great video to show it off.

 

I really do think Caley locos suit the Prussian blue far better than light sky-blue

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Sunny today, so after a busy week during which N0. 252 got turned at Yoker I thought I would take a couple of pics.

 

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Glaswegians might like to play at spotting the anachronism in the third photo. 

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I really like 0-4-2s and that one is a beauty, finished a treat.

 

That is the first model railway I've seen where the backscene continues through the window!

 

Alan

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Nice photo 26 power . 

 

Seems to a works photo of as built. 

 

Edited by Dave John
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It is, presumably, a Dubs works photo - their builder's plate is prominent on the cab side sheet, slightly lower than you've placed the number plate. What was Caledonian policy on builder's plates? There's no sign of the distinctive Dubs diamond on any other photos of 670s I've found online or on your model, though some do have an oval plate on the trailing splasher - is that a St Rollox "rebuilt" plate? The photo is photographic grey. At this period (c. 1870?) it's not unusual for a trade-built engine to display a more ornate livery in the official photo in grey than was actually worn in practice, or for the builders to apply their own interpretation of the company's livery to engines when delivered - by the end of the century, painting specifications supplied with the contract would be tightened up. There's a photo of a Neilson-built Midland Class 1102 0-6-0T, built 1874, with the tank side lined out in three panels - again photographic grey and so almost certainly a Neilson official photo. There's no evidence Derby ever painted lined out a tank loco like that, though scant evidence of how the engines were lined out on entering traffic.

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That pic is in the livery book , p227. 

 

I'd agree that it is probably in works grey, but it would have run in black until rebuilt as a mixed traffic engine.

 

I have fitted the little brass works plates to some locos , but I have run out of them. Not sure where I got the original etch from, but some will turn up in time.

 

 

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What's the anachronism, Dave.  I thought it must be something to do with the tenements, maybe the shops, but I'm stumped.

 

Alan

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It's really the shops Buhar. Mellis the Cheesemonger is actually a modern shop on the Great Western Road, but it has been refurbished in a very traditional style. So I used a photo of it since all the photos from the victorian era are monochrome. 

 

The Chemist is from the south side, but I can't remember where. 

 

Valid point about the close Blk4y. I intend to have a stair from the upper to the lower road in the same manner as Kelvinbridge. The close is on the Great Western Road side, the green painted wall being the basements of the shops on the GWR.  This is how I hope it will turn out. The red door is actually the fire exit from the subway. 

 

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