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S&D coaches - paint and lining.


Barry Ten

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After the full brake I showed in the last entry, I cracked on with a second vehicle from the same range of kits, while the build sequence was fresh in my mind. I think it's a composite!

 

I haven't progressed this second one completely as I'm still puzzling over the roof details, and might want to revisit the first one in the light of better understanding. The kits come with

four different types of castings representing the set-up for day and night running, but the instructions are frustratingly terse, just telling you that the drawing on the front of the kit is

running in day-mode, and leaving the modeller to figure out which castings are which and how night-running would work! A little drawing would have cost nothing and saved hours

of doubt, but hey-ho, such is the way of the great British model railway kit and I suppose it's what we call character-building.

 

sdjr.jpg.de04bb1a76d2f1d6c573294e9e60eb37.jpg

 

Now if I was being clever I'd crack on build the other two, but I felt that I needed a bit of motivation before soldiering on, and anyway I'd run out of wheels for the time being. I'd had the airbrush out in the conservatory for the first time this year, so it seemed like a good ideal to paint and line these two to give me a bit of confidence moving forward - keeping in mind there are also four bogie vehicles to be done at some point.

 

I don't have any etching primer at the moment, so the models were treated to Halford's white primer, but  being careful to let it bake on for at least 24 hours before applying a colour coat. I don't want to put words into someone's mouth but I recall reading one of the professional painters saying that they got on fine with the Halfords stuff, but it was important to let it dry thoroughly. Once I was happy with the primed coaches, I mixed up some thinned Railmatch S&D prussian blue and applied several very dilute coats over about 24 hours. I was very happy with the way this went on and after five or six coats I felt I was getting the right depth of colour.

 

The models were then left well alone with another 24 hours and then the lining commenced:

 

sdjr.jpg.45d62a15ed6a75a6120399171eceef9d.jpg

 

I used neat Humbrol enamel gloss yellow from a fresh tinlet (it just so happened that I needed a new tin anyway, but all the books seem to recommend using a fresh tin and it seems sound advice considering the relative costs of paint and kit). I must admit, despite some attempts, I haven't really got to grips with my Bob Moore lining pen, so for these I went back to the bow-pen which has served well enough in the past. I did however, have a bit of breakthrough in terms of technique. In the past I've always loaded up the pen with a decent blob of paint, but then I've found that the flow quickly becomes erratic and the pen needs to be repeatedly opened and cleaned. In Geoff Hayes' book on painting, which I picked up a few weeks ago, he says that you only need to apply a single drop of paint from the end of a cocktail stick, and that even two such drops is too much. Hmm, interesting - and completely counter to what I've been doing, which probably equals about 20 such droplets. I was a tiny bit skeptical about this but I have to say it works splendidly, and  was able to line most of the horizontal bits of these coaches with just a single application - maybe three or four in total for the vertical bits, corners and so on. Better still, because there's such a small amount of paint, most of it gets used and there's very little build-up of dried gunk between the jaws of the pen. Rather than cleaning it properly between each drop, using thinners, I just wiped it clean on tissue and applied another drop. For these coaches, too, I also tried to slow down my drawing of the line, giving the paint time to flow out and not stutter. Although the drawing is slower, the process as a whole goes so much more smoothly that the job is much less time-consuming. taking about 30 minutes per side.

 

I'd purposely not lined the ventilators as I wasn't decided how to tackle them. Over on Wright's Writes, Ian Rathone helpfully suggested leaving them off on future builds, only adding them after the lining is done - which helps get everything square, too. For these, though, I returned to them tonight and added the lining onto the ventilator itself, which is probably a no-no but looks fine in context and much better than leaving them unlined.

 

Based on my 7mm S&D stock (see earlier), the droplights should be a reddish-brown colour which I think will add a little something. Then it's on to transfers and door handles etc. Fun!

 

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Are you lining on the beading or on the panelling?

 

image.png.ce158163811fc5cc71765fe0c55e0ee2.png

 

[Andrew Bone from Weymouth, England, CC BY 2.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0>, via Wikimedia Commons]

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  • RMweb Gold

On the panelling (but as close to the edge as I can get the pen). I don't think I'd be able to do a consistent job of

lining onto the beading and I favour consistency over accuracy!

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  • RMweb Gold

They look great Barry, I'm following with interest as I have two S&D milk vans to do.  I will use Vallejo Prussian blue as dedicated railway colour model paints are unavailable in Perth.

 

Kind regards,

 

Iain

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  • RMweb Gold
16 hours ago, Iain.d said:

They look great Barry, I'm following with interest as I have two S&D milk vans to do.  I will use Vallejo Prussian blue as dedicated railway colour model paints are unavailable in Perth.

 

Kind regards,

 

Iain

 

I think any prussian-ish blue will do the job nicely.

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  • RMweb Gold

They look beautiful, Al. What a train it will be.

 

The stepboards give me a headache though :)

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  • RMweb Gold
On 30/06/2021 at 00:13, Iain.d said:

They look great Barry, I'm following with interest as I have two S&D milk vans to do.  I will use Vallejo Prussian blue as dedicated railway colour model paints are unavailable in Perth.

 

Kind regards,

 

Iain

 

They are looking fabulous Barry.

 

If car colours are available in Perth, Rover Midnight Blue is a good match. That said, what with fading in sunlight and darkening due to exposure to Sulphur the colour would have varied considerably.

 

Jerry

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  • RMweb Gold

The roof details in the photo of no.20 in Colin Maggs' Highbridge in its Heyday, show a gas lamp top centrally on the centre line of each passenger compartment, with a smaller cylindrical fitting on the centre line just to one side - which side depends on which side you are looking from. When I cut and shut mine, from Triang clerestories, back in about 1970 I made two errors - I put ventilators instead of gas light tops and lined the beading in gold not yellow. I was working from much more limited information at the time. I consciously didn't change the GWR grab handles for the SDJR elongated 'S' ones, as I thought I would mess the mouldings too much.

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  • RMweb Gold

According to the instructions (which I don't have with me right now), it was gold lining until 1911-ish then yellow. My 7mm coaches are lined in gold but I went with yellow on these as I wanted to be able to run them in combination with post-grouping stock.

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6 minutes ago, Barry Ten said:

According to the instructions (which I don't have with me right now), it was gold lining until 1911-ish then yellow. My 7mm coaches are lined in gold but I went with yellow on these as I wanted to be able to run them in combination with post-grouping stock.

So I might have been using the old scheme. My collection of S&D stock is rather flexible in its era. In my youf I wasn't too fixated on the dates liveries came and went and this will carry over into my Highbridge Wharf diorama when I actually lay some track etc.! Yellow certainly would have been easier to paint with than Humbrol gold enamel, although now I have dragged it out of the garage, it didn't turn out too bad with its hand painted lettering. I couldn't do it now!

 

SDJR 6wheeled composite with luggage compartment 4mm 1970 conversion.jpg

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Compound2632

Posted (edited)

48 minutes ago, phil_sutters said:

The roof details in the photo of no.20 in Colin Maggs' Highbridge in its Heyday, show a gas lamp top centrally on the centre line of each passenger compartment, with a smaller cylindrical fitting on the centre line just to one side - which side depends on which side you are looking from. 

 

When these carriages had oil lamps, there was a bung that went in the lamp hole during daylight hours and this fitting held the bung when it was taken out to put the oil lamp in. The bung was anchored by a bit of chain to stop it falling off the roof. See Maggs Plates 55-57, 60, 62. I don't know whether the fitting still served a purpose once the carriage was converted to gas lighting; they are still in place on at least some Midland arc-roof carriages converted to gas lighting. (Midland and S&DJR arc-roof carriages of the 1880s-90s are generally identical in details.) Looking closely though, I think there may be a difference in this fitting for oil and gas lamps. For oil lamps, the fitting is a sort of stool or 4-legged trivet, whereas for gas lamps it appears to be a plain cylinder, and slightly taller.

 

Here's the roof of my Connoisseur Midland D418 milk van, showing the early type stools and oil-lamp bungs in their holes:

 

582200043_MidlandD418roofstep9.JPG.3db1365cfe425d8f225524bff7e0b201.JPG

Edited by Compound2632
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