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1ngram

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  1. Ive never seen any evidence that ANY ROD locos were painted khaki in Europe though some were painted that colour in UK at the end of the war and after ROD had been disbanded (with WD markingss not ROD ones).. Wm. Aves in both his authoritative books says definitively that all ROD locos were black by mid 1918 whatever colour they arrived in. If you have any evidence there were khaki ROD locos I would like to see it. Some J36 on their return to the UK (and still in ROD livery) in 1919 seem to be a very weathered black or even a dark gray - but no khaki, it would appear.
  2. 1ngram

    MRJ 272

    And I always thought Maud Junction was on GNSR in North East Scotland
  3. Good review of the R.O.D. 2-8-0 loco in genuine ROD black. And its got the necessary Westinghouse gear. As such its a pity that Hornby seem to be about to foist a khaki (should be black) J36 R.O.D. version on us in a few months. Mind you, at £148 or so the 2-8-0 isnt cheap !
  4. Not a rail colour but is there a car spray colour to match the kinda red/rust colour steel bridges like the Forth Bridge are painted in?
  5. "I have toned down the red inside motion with Vallejo 'oil and grease', which looks much better, 'Haig' will get the same treatment!" Dioes anyone know where one can acquire this "grease and oil" paint in the UK?
  6. Just ask for the ROD letters I got them to do for me. Someone else already did and they came to me and asked my permission to let him have a set. Just do the same. I told them that anyone could have them as they come from a published font. Here's the email I sewnt John Peck KENNETH CLARK <[email protected]> To:[email protected] 29 Jun 2018 at 14:35 I was given your email address as a firm able to print white transfers. I'm attempting a ROD cameo layout in 4mm after reading both of Wm Aves excellent books on the ROD railways of WW1. The lettering on their locos was very simple and I attach a file below showing what a transfer/decal would be required to allow anyone to letter/number a single loco. This would allow the letters and numbers to be cut out and placed in position depending on the length of the relevant tender. The typeface is 28 point Arial (using l as 1) and is white. Maybe they could be a little more separate but I don't know how to do this. I did the image in PAINT but it can easily be done in WORD. I would want a sheet of these to match your minimum cost (£10/£15?)in a white strong enough to be put on black tenders. Can you come back to me on this giving me an idea of how many would be printed on such a sheet (I know a few other people interested in these so I would like to know how many could be got for what price. Obviously if you need the "artwork"(sic) in any other way I would try to provide it. But remember I am an elderly computer illiterate! Kenneth Clark Aberdeen
  7. Precision Labels (see modelling press) did an excellent job of making me sets of ROD numbers and letters for my J15. And a speedy service too!
  8. Here's my take on the ROD Baldwin using a Bachman USA loco.
  9. Is the cabside numberplate(?) printed on or is it a raised moulding?
  10. I haven't seen the LNER J36 yet but I expect the numberplate to be a raised moulding but I dont know if it is a separate piece glued on although I think this is likely as there are other versions of the loco with only a printed number. Mind you. lookinmg again at an enlarged photo of the loco it could be it has a printed numberplate? Can anyone who just got theirs tell us? If you are asking about the photo of the J15 then the numberplate comes from Guilplates. I got the white transfers done for me by Precision Labels. Excellent quality and prompt service.
  11. Here's my attempt on the Hornby J15. I searched in WORD for a font which looked like the ROD one and got a couple of transfer sheets made up for me in white by an advertiser in a mag.: I'm looking forward to doing the same with the LNER J36. Can anyone tell me how to take the existing loco numberplate off so I can replace it with one from a loco that actually ran on the ROD? I've used Guilplates in the past but does anyone else provide this service?
  12. In plain black you could also have it as a ROD loco in France. Transfers are available but you would have to replace the number plate as this loco wasn't a ROD one. Better than waiting for the incorrectly coloured khaki one Hornby currently intend producing.
  13. . In the recent “British Military Railways Overseas in the Great War” compiled by The British Overseas Railway Historical Trust there is a chapter by Dr. P.E, Waters detailing the ROD broadgauge locomotives. There he says: “Liveries varied. Locomotives requisitioned in the early stages were usually sent to France in the livery of the owning company, but later locomotives were painted dull black . . . .Some engines may have been painted grey when new.” (page 309) In William Aves first book on the ROD “The Railway Operating Division in France” he says on page 128: “Such photographic evidence as survives indicates that where engines were repainted by their parent companies before dispatch, they were turned out in plain or matt black, or dark grey.” Then on page 129 he says: “As time went by, most ROD tender locomotives were repainted plain black. . .” The intended Hornby ROD loco, ROD 5662, for example, is based on a photo of the loco on its return to Eastfield shed in 1919, which photo appears in Aves book on page 118. There are two other photos of these locomotives in Aves’ second book on the ROD (The Lines Behind the Front), of ROD 6682 again at Eastfield in 1919 (page 79), and a lone one in France of ROD 5666 on page 71). The colour of these locos could be a faded dirty black or a dark grey. There is no evidence that they were ever coloured khaki and by 1919, when the photograph Hornby are undoubtedly copying was taken, they would almost certainly have been repainted. So, Dark Grey or Black. I think the latter most likely but have a look at the photos yourself. The only reference I've ever seen to any ROD locos in khaki is that some of the newly built Baldwins may have started out in khaki but were repainted black during 1918. I've never seen any justification for Oxford's khaki Dean Goods and I really hope that Hornby abandon their intended khaki J36. Their justification is a comment in a NBRSG magazine based solely on thre B+W photographs the Study Group have. The article by Euan Cameron appears in issue no. 125 and is entitled “The Holmes 18” 0-6-0s.” Of their colours when in the ROD he says: “Several photographs exist of NBR locomotives as returned from war service: the locomotives were painted in all-over drab which may have been khaki or dark grey, though khaki would have been the easiest colour to apply over the NB livery of the time.” But this is mere supposition and is contradicted by every other writer - as shown above.
  14. Thanks to the invaluable assistance of the North British Study circle I’ve managed to get my hands on a copy of the 2015 article on the J36s in France with the R.O.D. that Islesy says Hornby are taking their information from. But in fact the article doesn’t say the J36 were painted khaki. Indeed all the evidence is to the contrary. The article by Euan Cameron appears in issue no. 125 and is entitled “The Holmes 18” 0-6-0s.” Of their colours when in the ROD he says: “Several photographs exist of NBR locomotives as returned from war service: the locomotives were painted in all-over drab which may have been khaki or dark grey, though khaki would have been the easiest colour to apply over the NB livery of the time.” By 1917/8 when the locos were sent to France the NBR locos were either in their pre-WW1 lined olive livery or the new goods livery of black lined yellow. In the recent “British Military Railways Overseas in the Great War” compiled by The British Overseas Railway Historical Trust there is a chapter by Dr. P.E, Waters detailing the ROD broadgauge locomotives. There he says: “Liveries varied. Locomotives requisitioned in the early stages were usually sent to France in the livery of the owning company, but later locomotives were painted dull black . . . .Some engines may have been painted grey when new.” (page 309) In William Aves first book on the ROD “The Railway Operating Division in France” he says on page 128: “Such photographic evidence as survives indicates that where engines were repainted by their parent companies before dispatch, they were turned out in plain or matt black, or dark grey.” Then on page 129 he says: “As time went by, most ROD tender locomotives were repainted plain black. . .” The intended Hornby ROD loco, ROD 5662 is based on a photo of the loco on its return to Eastfield shed in 1919, which appears in Aves book on page 118. There are two other photos of these locomotives in Aves’ second book on the ROD (The Lines Behind the Front), of ROD 6682 again at Eastfield in 1919 (page 79), and a lone one in France of ROD 5666 on page71). The colour of these locos could be a faded dirty black or a dark grey. There is no evidence that they were ever coloured khaki and by 1919, when the photograph Hornby are undoubtedly copying was taken, they would almost certainly have been repainted. So, Dark Grey or Black. Hopefully it is not too late for Hornby to avoid a livery error spoiling what looks set to be a very welcome addition to its range of J36s and give us an accurately coloured ROD loco.
  15. Are there any photos of the WW1 charges? There are photos in Aves but they seem to be complete shells for smaller howitzers?
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